Taurus Firearm Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can I shoot lead through my pt111(non pro)?I know it has the polygonal barrel,so I was wondering if it was like the glock situation.thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
35,526 Posts
Because of the cost of doing so. There are apparently 3 advantages to polygonal rifling:

- Higher velocities due to reduced friction of the bullet in the barrel, as the polygonal rifling has less surface area than the lands and grooves of a traditionally rifled barrel
- Less bullet deformation, resulting in reduced drag on the bullet which helps to increase range and accuracy
- Increased barrel life and reduced buildup of copper or lead within the barrel

The advantages don't make that much sense, I imagine, to adopt the expensive forging process required for polygonal rifling. If you want a bit more velocity, buy +P ammo. Nobody except LEO's care much about bullet deformation, and the barrel can be replaced under the lifetime warranty, if that ever became necessary.

In addition, polygonal rifled barrels, such as in Glocks, are very suseptible to excessive leading. In fact, Glock's manual warns of this, and also warns of the slide not returning to proper position, as well as barrel constriction, if the gun isn't cleaned and all leading removed very fasidiously.

All in all, it doesn't sound like that big of a deal, at least to me, that Taurus went the direction they did. They keep their guns affordable. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
2 of your statements seem kinda' contradictory?

texastaurusguy said:
- Increased barrel life and reduced buildup of copper or lead within the barrel

and:

In addition, polygonal rifled barrels, such as in Glocks, are very suseptible to excessive leading.
I'm confused. (not unusual for me, in this forum!)

Thanks..
Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,000 Posts
i would'nt use lead in 9mm period.. infact the only semi-auto i'd be "ok" with using lead would be .32,.25,.22

if you insist on using lead rounds in 9mm i've heard of a old trick (which i do not know if it works)
is to to load up every 5-10 rounds with 1 or 2 fmj's..

it's said that firing a fmj after a couple of lead rounds will clean the barrel out somewhat without fear of a build up enough between FMJ's to cause KB's or overpressure.

if you do fire lead rounds i would however make sure you clean it out pretty good before shooting the harder jacketed ammo in it.

bottom line my advice is to ditch lead rounds for your pt111 unless you get it dirt cheap or givin to you, or it's a SHTF and you need every round you can get your hands on.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
35,526 Posts
Tim, I believe that "Increased barrel life and reduced buildup of copper or lead within the barrel " is the theory - the reality is that excessive leading does occur.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah,I don't WANT to shoot lead,but the indoor range I belong too requires it.although now I found out it's not a polygonal barrel after all......at least I'm told.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
Only problem I've ever had with lead bullets in 357 mag is if you try to push them too fast and they aren't hard enough. So I go with heavier bullets & lower velocitys to avoid any leading problems. I haven't had any leading issues with my PT111 MP with 125 & 147.

Your range might allow plated bullets, but the ones I've used the plating came off and the lead underneath is way soft. (Berry Bullets) They shot really bad as well. The recovered bullets in snow & ice had very clear rifling marks and no plating left on sides of bullet. 147's recovered same day looked like I could load and shoot again, and were more accurate.

I've never looked down a Poly barrel, but check my PT and looks like normal rifling to me?
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top