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I have about 1,000 rounds through by PT 92 and the trigger just does not seem to be getting any smoother. I have not checked the trigger pull weight, but it seems heavy to me. Has anyone had a trigger job done on a 92? If so, was the improvement worth it?
 

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not really a trigger job but put a beretta 92D hammer spring in mine.. it did make the SA noticbily lighter.. about 250 rounds later it is lighter still.. DA did'nt notice much change.

although never tested it it's been discussed and generally agreed that taurus factory hammer springs are lighter then beretta springs.. but the "D" spring seems to be a little lighter still..

it cost me like 4 bucks plus shipping for the spring.. the newer guns have a internal safety lock which can be quite nerve racking to reinstall.. but other then that it is a simple operation.

i am happy with the change even though it is not as dramatic on a taurus as it is on a beretta it's still a cheap little mod you can safely do with a set of punches, a small hammer, and some free time.
 

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I was going to suggest that as well. I installed a 'D' spring on my 92FS and I have to sy SA pull didn't change that much but DA trigger became noticeably ligher...
 

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Well I just did my shade tree trigger job and it turned out quite well I think. My PT92 has already had quite a few thousand rounds through it so it was already smoothed out some. I didn't polish all contact surfaces on this trigger job like I did on my Beretta.

I polished the sides of the sear and hammer but I don't know if it helped any as there weren't many wear marks so I'm guessing there is very little friction there. I was going to polish the non-exposed side of the trigger bar where it might rub against the frame but again there no wear marks so I didn't. I did square up the single action hooks on the hammer which was already pretty good so probably not needed. I did not lower the hook height or anything though. I polished the part of the sear which is responsible for the SA pull. I also added a very slight secondary angle to the sear face (1911 guys will know what I'm talking about). I also have already installed a Wolff 16lb. hammer spring.

The differences are definitely noticeable. Well worth my time I think which was about an hour or two including complete assembly/disassembly. SA is now crisp and light. No grittiness or creep when compared to the stock setup and breaks like the proverbial glass rod. DA was already pretty good to begin with but I can tell it is a little smoother. Might have been from all the carbon I cleaned out from around the hammer bushing and safety pin as it took about 5 hoppe's soaked q-tips just to get the bushing clean. After reassembly I did a safety function test and all is well. I've done similar trigger jobs on every gun I own except my AR and all have functioned 100% (my Ruger P345 turned out extremely well). But as with everything else in this lawyer-happy country, do at your own risk. The key is to not take off too much and maintain all angles. When you shoot it for the first time only load a few rounds in the mag just in case you screwed up and you get hammer follow.

Also in the link I gave above to the berettaforum trigger job thread recommends 600 grit sandpaper and a knife sharpening stone. IMHO this is a little too aggressive if you are doing it for the first time and I like to use 2000 grit wet with oil and a X-Fine ceramic stone. Takes a little longer but you're less likely to remove too much. You don't need it to shine like a mirror but it will feel like one when you rub your finger across it.
 

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I am geting ready to do this. I am ordering the springs from wolff tomorrow. I have managed to get everything apart except the hammer and sear. It looks as though the safety has to be romoved. I have an older PT92c (compact) without decocker function. The safety is mounted on the frame. The only way I see to get the safety off is to remove a roll pin on the left hand lever. Is this the proper way to remove the hammer and sear. The beretta video guide differs at this point because the safety is on the slide. I couldn't find anything to show how to get the sear and hammer out for the Taurus.

Also, anyone know where to get grips for this thing?
 

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Way to bring up a year old thread...I am also interested, as Im thinking about doing this if the "D" spring dont make me happy.
 

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Just took mine apart here at work. Yes you have to drift the small roll pin out of the left side safety lever. Once it is out you can pull apart the ambi safety. Once that is out, there is a bushing holding the hammer in. Slip out the bushing and out comes the hammer. Be carefull as there is a small pin and spring under the left side safety lever. Removing the sear is the same as in the beretta pictorial. Now all I have to do is polish the rough areas up and change springs. I ordered the Wolff hammer spring pack which has one each 16# and 17# reduced power springs. I did not order the new style trigger spring as I was told the hammer spring is most of the trigger pull.

Now to find grips.
 

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For real Mr. McGavin, you should post some pics, with detailed writes up. And have it stickified. I would pray to you if you did that.
 

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everything is here. http://www.beretta92fs.com/

The only thing that differs is how to remove the hammer. The sear is the same. On the Taurus you have to remove the safety as descibed above. The hardest part is finding a small enough punch to drift the roll pin out. Don't push it all the way out. Just enough to clear the shaft. This will make it much easier to reassemble. Also the pin in the base of the handle tha needs to be roved to get the hammer/main spring out is different. In the Beretta video, he shows pushing in on the lanyard loop and pressing the pin easily out. Not the case with my Taurus. Mine had a roll pin that had to be punched out with a drift. The Beretta uses a solid pin held in place by the grips and spring pressure. The Taurus comes out the same way but needs a punch and hamer to get out. Once again don't press it completely out. Just enough to drop the spring.

As far as polishing, I just cleaned up the rough spots on the Hammer where the sear makes contact. I also sanded all the holes and pinns that the trigger and hammer pivot on. Anything that is involved in the trigger to hammer connection got polished and had Miltec applied.

Mike
 

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I used the 16lb. Wolff spring in mine (see post above from a year ago :D ). A year and about 1500-2000 rds. later I have not had any primers fail to ignite from various manufacturers. Also no issues with my home brew trigger job. Although right now I've 'sidelined' the pistol as my locking block is showing some peening and I want to replace it before it gets any worse. I will say the pistol was very accurate to begin with, which was one of the reasons I sold my Beretta but kept this Taurus. With the trigger job this pistol makes me look like a much better marksman than I really am. Only other modifications have been a heavier recoil spring and Hogue grips. Soon it will also have a 3rd gen Beretta locking block. I did notice the locking block was fine as I inspect it after every shooting session, except the last time I took it out I used a lot of +P ammo that was given to me from a friend. That is when I noticed it starting to peen so basically a new locking block and no more +P ammo for me.

Maaso, a simple spring swap will not smooth anything out. If you have a heavy and gritty trigger pull it will just make it a lighter and gritty pull. The only way to really smooth it out is a lot of dry firing and/or rounds sent down range or take her apart and smooth it out yourself (or a gunsmith if you don't have much experience with jobs like that). The key is just to polish (think thousandths of an inch or less as far as material removal) and not take too much. You can stone down any burrs or other flaws just make sure to bring them down to the level of the surrounding surface and not any less. I doubt Taurus thorough hardens their parts so its probably just a surface hardness treatment so if you take too much you will get down to the softer metal underneath which will wear much more quickly possibly ruining your trigger job in sort order and having to get new parts. Not to mention some unsafe conditions such as hammer follow and what not. I don't mean to discourage, just take her easy and it should turn out fine.
 

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I've built well over a 1000 engines, so its not like Im not mechanically retarded or anything. How exactly should I go about polishing? My neighbor was telling me to use something called "Flits....with a Z" I dont know though, I've never polished anything before. Info on how to do that would be GREATLY appreciated.
 

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I used an extra fine ceramic stone normally used for knife sharpening and some 2000 grit sandpaper lubed with oil. I made sure the stone had 90* edges so I could square up the sear engagement surfaces. My pistol already had a few thousand rounds through it before I did this so when it was apart you could see all the surfaces that rub as the finish was removed or slightly worn. Also any uneven surfaces were even more evident versus tearing down an unfired pistol. I just wrapped the stone with the sandpaper and shined up all the non critical areas. Smoothing out all of those surfaces along with the 16lb. spring really help with the DA pull. For the SA pull most of the 'trigger job' is in polishing the sear engagement surface. I used the stone lubed up with oil and squared up the hammer hook to where it had a good 90* angle on it. Then polished and squared the sear in relation to the hammer and added a slight bevel or secondary angle to the sear. With the secondary angle the sear has less contact surface (think friction here) with the hammer which really makes the pull even better IMHO. But that is the important area where you don't want to remove too much. You can also remove some of the depth in the hammer hook height to reduce the distance the sear has to travel to release the hammer but I did not. There are a lot of guides on how to do 1911 trigger jobs and a lot of the principals apply to any pistol so I would start there.

All in all it is actually pretty easy. Just take it apart and polish all surfaces where there is contact. The sides of the hammer and sear, inside of trigger bar, pin holes, sides of the trigger that is in the frame, etc. You can take everything to a mirror polish if you want but in reality if you can run your fingernail over it and it feels like glass any further polishing is just for looks. The real hardcore trigger jobs polish all possible surfaces that rub down to the firing pin safety plunger. But the majority of the SA trigger job (~90%) is in the hammer and sear relationship. The rest of the polished parts help with the DA pull.

Also if you do decide to do an all out trigger job you can drill out a hole on the back of the trigger and epoxy in a pin so it hits the frame when the trigger is pulled all of the way back. It should not drop the hammer at first. You then file it down more and more until the hammer does drop. Then just take a few more strokes with the file for insurance and you have just made an overtravel stop. Do a function check to make sure everything works fine and if not just remove a little more material. Try to find a picture of Ernest Langdon's speed bump trigger for Beretta's to get an idea of where to drill for the pin.

Also I didn't mean to demean your mechanical ability but this is the internet so you can never be too sure. As to the Flitz I have never used the stuff but have heard good things about it. As far as polishing I have heard Flitz is good for surfaces that are already smooth but to take a rough casting to a mirror shine takes a lot more work, polishing compounds, etc. Hope my rambling has helped you some. I can get a little long winded sometimes. ;D

Oh, I almost forgot, when you are all done and reassembling use a good moly lube or even the militec treatment as McGavin has done to really get the trigger slicked up.
 

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No, I love ramblimg....its more informative. I ordered my "d" spring from some guy named Dave Olhasso or something. When it comes in and I tear the main spring apart, I will tackle this. Luckily e-gunparts has a new hammer and sear instock if I take too much off.
 
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