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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I bought my 1911 it was shooting 2" to the right at 20'. I have adjusted the rear sight about as far as I think I want to. At 10 yards it is dead on. At 25 yards I am still about 1-2 inches right. Here is my issue, the gun points very naturally for me but when I pull up, to quickly get on target I notice I always have to adjust a little because my rear sight is soo far to the left. Were it not drifted I would be staring straight down my sights every time. I am at a loss. Do I adjust the drift the rear sight more? Do I drift the front slightly to the right? Could it be a ammo issue? I have 400 rounds through mostly Blazer Brass FMJ's. I also notice that the crowning is not perfectly uniform as I would expect. Any advice would be appreciated. Great gun just want to address this issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would be inclined to agree that it could be a trigger control problem. However when testing I have been shooting from a firm rest with very concientious trigger control. I'm not saying I never pull a shot but I feel it when I do. It is consistently right at 25 yards. Thanks for the link I read through and will see what I can make happen next time. Would moving the front sight be advisable?
 

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This is a piggyback to Cimarron's take on this.

Different bullet weights and brands can vary the point of impact. Even if the brand is the same different batches can still so this.

Where the gun is rested or one's hands from a sandbag or any rest can create the same effects as you have described. Consistancy off of a rest or what part of the gun rests on the sand bag can do this also.

Drifting of the sights is fine if all else comes up dry.If this is the load you will carry for defense or defense and practice then go ahead.

Proper hand grip is the other bug-a-boo. Even if one is a 1911 vet there can be issues.

Each variant of 1911 has grips that are just enough different for one another. How high and where to grip has to looked at.

Beavertails size and placement, grip safety grip and placement have to be taken into consideration. Have to change one's grip method for each particular pistol.

Crush grip does work for most pistols. Getting a grip as tight as you can make it without causing pain or blood circulation problems helps give a consistant grip ever time. Takes care of the maladies fo shifting around while firing.

Thumbs locked high, locked out straight, or locked in the down position are another thing to look at. Thumbs locked straight down keeps these away from possible contact the slide,slide stop, or other gun part that could cause a jam or or malfunction.

GGSTM, even though you may think that you are doing everything right, and you may be, have someone mentor and watch your shooting grip and follow through for each shot. Constructive criticism from others who are have the knowledge and experience with this can be most helpful.

For example, I shot revolvers only for many years. Then went and had to relearn because of DA/SA semi-autos I purchased. Then went and got a PT111 and had to relearn because of DAO trigger that it has. Had mentors watch when I was all over the map with the shots.
Got well thought out tips from veteran gunnies that helped me get on track. This after they had watched the shooting process I had been using.
These guys more than willing to help.

We can tell you what we think is the problem, but cannot be there physically to see this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advice. I am in the process of trying a different grip. In the meantime I will keep my eye out for someone who can really lay em in there with a 1911 for advice. I am also going to try different brands and practice as much as possible. Maybe time is all I need to work this out. Thanks again.
 
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