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A friend has a Taurus model 617 and was telling me it has a minimum projectile weight restriction according to the owner's manual. I thought that sounded odd so I looked it up, here is what it says verbatim (including the typo):

"The Taurus .357 Magnum Total Titanium Revolvers (Models 617 and 627) have been
extensively tested with various .357 Magnum cartridges. We have determined that .357
Magnum catridges which utilize bullet weights of at least 125 grains are perfectly suitable
to be fired in your revolver.
.357 Magnum cartridges with bullet weights of less than 125 grains have resulted
in cylinder face erosion and should not be utilized in your Total Titanium revolver"


I'm an Engineer and I have a background in machinery, Physics, etc. but I'm scratching my head about what this claim is based on. What would be the explanation for this? Would it be that lighter projectiles tend to have heavier powder charges and therefore perhaps more flame leading to "cylinder face erosion"? I dunno, sounds goofy to me so far and the manual offered no further explanation for the reason behind this warning.
 

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2cents.gif Personally I don't like even the 125 grain bullet in a .357, I prefer the heaver bullets and get much better accuracy. As for Taurus's thinking I could not say....
 
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Maybe they are referring to flame cutting. I've seen that in the top strap of some revolvers, so I suppose it could occur on the cylinder face as well. And titanium might be more susceptible. Just my thoughts.
 

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Maybe they are referring to flame cutting. I've seen that in the top strap of some revolvers, so I suppose it could occur on the cylinder face as well. And titanium might be more susceptible. Just my thoughts.
The .357 Maximum revolver's were famous for that....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ok, I get that Titanium alloys may be susceptible to flame cutting, but why is this related to a boundary of projectile weight?
 

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It relates, distantly, to the same problem S&W experienced with their "K" frame 357 revolvers. Lighter bullet, larger charge, hence there is a much larger, hotter combustion at the Barrel/Cylinder gap. The much more virulent(I like that word right here) fire ball is hotter and of longer duration with the lighter bullets. This has never been specifically and scientifically proven but it has come into general acceptance in the industry. That made me tired!!!!!
 

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Taurus has the forcing cone down pat.... (unlike the early S&W 357 mag K frames)......on the steel models at least....I still would steer away from a steady diet of 110gr 357 mag. projectiles ...but a few here and there will not hurt your revolver....
 

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Taurus has the forcing cone down pat.... (unlike the early S&W 357 mag K frames)......on the steel models at least....I still would steer away from a steady diet of 110gr 357 mag. projectiles ...but a few here and there will not hurt your revolver....

I wonder if anyone here has a velocity for the 110 gr in the 357?
 

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While I wouldn't use the 110 grain for self defense, I've sure shot enough of it over the years, with no problem at all. My favorite defense load is the Federal 125 grain SJHP load. It's pretty hot, and is the number one load in rated one shot stops.....if you believe in that type of thing.

I've never seen anything lighter than 110 grain in either 38 special or 357 magnum.
 
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