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Well, I shot my qual course for my CCW last night w/ my PT145. The course consists of a sting of 72 rds. I stopped counting Failure to Feeds at about the 12th one. When I shot, the old casing was ejected and the new round would nose dive into the feed ramp without chambering. This of course, caused the slide to be held back.

To fix the problem I had to lock the slide back, drop the mag, slam it home again then release the slide. Obviously, not something I want to be doing in a SD situation. The problem occured with both mags.

Any idea what could be up? The gun has about 600 rds through it. Sounds like it needs a trip to Taurus.
 

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Most likely its a mag issue. Maybe a weak mag spring? Any chance you leave those mags sitting around loaded all the time? Just fishing here, but I would start with the lowest and least expensive) alternative first.
 

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Make sure they are seated all the way. Mine have a tendancy to not seat all the way sometimes, just barely not enough. It could also be a cleaning issue. Make sure that the barrel and more importantly the feed ramp is where it's suppose to be.
 

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Dave... how far into the mag did these FTF's appear? From first round... or part way?

Before you do anything drastic, try taking the mag apart and cleaning it... making sure the follower is not binding... burnt powder coats everything... including the inside of the mag.

Also check the angle of the bullets in the mag. Level looks nice, but the bullets should have a slight upward angle to catch the feed ramp rather than slam into it.

Since you have had good luck up until this point, I am suspecious of the mags until you totally rule them out. Know anyone with a PT145 to try their mags out in your gun?
 

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Dave: any results back regarding the above mentioned "possible" magazine problems? May I also ask what ammo you were using and, if you have ever experience similar problems during Range fire and/or just practice fire at a leisurely firing pace. Also...how many rounds have you fired through your pistol prior to taking the course. These are the tests I am interested in...please give us as much info as possible.
 

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One other thing. The newest American Hangunner issue has info that FTE and FTF problems can be part of the breaking in process. While usually general knowledge, this is a good point to go over again and again just to remind us all. Easy to overlook the obvious.

Like a car engine needing to be broken in gradually, the gun is the same way. Kinks and problems should smooth out after the 200 round or more goal is reached. Anything after that could be signaling a problem.

Not that problems cannot develop early on, but the break in period takes patience, time, and experience getting used to the gun, or for the gun to be ready to go.
 

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Hey guys new to the forum.
I recently got the PT-145 from a friend who never cleaned it once and shot around 150 bullets through it before I got it I of course took it straight to the range and the bullets would not feed in I could get maybe two shots off before having to basically pull the slide back a quarter of an inch and refeed it in and get maybe two shots off and do it again it sucked, went to wal-mart got Break Free cleaned it top to bottom went back to the range with 150 bullets and ya know what notta one jam notta one time did I have to re chamber a bullet worked perfectly, cleaned again after that session and on Sunday took to Finger Lakes with 250 bullets and didn't have one problem until I reached around around 230 shots fired then I started getting a loading problem every four five shots but it was only on the Shot shells that were not feeding in but they are shapped weird so that could have been it.
I'm liking the gun more and more everytime out. Last Sunday they I was rapid firing the hell out of the gun two-three clips at a time and no problems when I got home sprayed her down with Break Free and cleaned her up...

Oh and I have one orig magazine and one brand new one so I don't think it was mag problem think it was just dirty..

CFM
 

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A friend of mine has problems every time he fires my PT145, while I never have. Ever. I attribute it to limp-wristing the gun.
 

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Good post Thecfm2. Too many times I have read about people buying new autos and heading straight out to fire them without cleaning, then downing the gun as a piece of garbage because it won't feed ammo or eject ammo like it should. A solid initial cleaning of the gun before heading to the range will prevent many many headaches and frustration over a new purchase.
 

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Qwiks draw said:
Like a car engine needing to be broken in gradually, the gun is the same way. Kinks and problems should smooth out after the 200 round or more goal is reached. Anything after that could be signaling a problem.
He states in the post that this started after 600 rounds. Past the point of breaking in.
I'd try cleaning the mags. Gummed up with gunpowder.

Try locking back the slide, put in a mag and see how everything lines up. Should be an upward cant to the bullets.
I wouldn't send it back to Taurus just yet. ;)
 

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It's recommended that these compact and subcompact pistols be cleaned,lubed, and checked over closely before going to the range before or during break in periods. After getting back form the range cleaning and lube are paramount. A lot of people take that advice to heart. Others don't and can't figure it out.
Small pistols are finicky about a lot of things. That's the nature of the beast.

There's an article in one of the recent magazines in which the subject is about trying to getting Kimber and Springfield guns that are the size of Colt's Officers .45ACP to work well and why they won't.

Physics being what it is makes it hard to get a gun to function well and a lot.

There are good ways to do this, but like the .38 Special, these are specialists guns. From what it and how it's fed, to grip, and stance, being high maintenance, all these play into the equation. Total dedication means taking the time to learn ALL the performance characteristics, how these small pistols behave, and the vagaries that come with it. Also dealing with the vagaries and limitations can be added into pot. The gun's and the user's.

Dealing with only a small part of these requirements means leaving one's self wide open for troubles to arise at many points along the way. And it looks like that is happening with increasing frequency.

Mentoring or getting good solid instruction to shoot used to be a given at one time. Now there seems to be less of it or the instruction being sought out and used.

We try to fool ourselves by saying we can do it on our own. For some, and that's a minority, the instruction is actually accepted or found out and gone with.

Pride has some to do with it. "If he can do it I can", is how it goes. I'll teach myself. How hard can it be? Or, guys are naturals at this. There are other aspects of pride.
Rationalization also enters into this. Not enough time, do it later,i.e., on and on it goes. "We don't need no stinking instruction"' to parpharase a popular movie line.

If one is going to do something, then do it right. To do it right, one has to know what to do and how to do it. And have it commited for the most part to memory and the subconscious.

This may all sound obvious, but this kind of thing is ignored or forgotten about for any number of reasons.

This is not directed at anyone as a put down or slam. Everyone at some time has been in those shoes.

These are just observations.

Granted, some times it is the gun. Mechanical contrivances need lots of tender loving care..... and maintenance. ;D These also break or need parts replacement at intervals or as needed.

One of the recent articles in one of the periodicals did magazine tests for over 8 brands of magazines for the .45ACP for 1911s. Even the smaller ones. The tester ahd over a half dozen manufacturer's mags fail with jams,nose dives, and stove piping, and other assorted maladies that can afflict mags of any kind.

The failure rate was high for even some of the 'better' or 'high priced' mags as well.
If I find that puppy will try to give the gist of the article and what makes were tested.

Sound familiar, folks?
Thought so.
Will end this here as it is getting loooong in length.
 

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If the rest of that post was read then you know that it also acknowledged that after the break in period( it was obviously past that) that then signaled a problem with the gun.
Guess I needed to clarify that a bit. ;D

The caveat is if all other things had been looked at,fixes tried, and things didn't work out, then back to the factory with it.

Mag springs, firing pins,debris caught in the mags,firing pin channel, weak mag catch spring, and other possibilities need to be looked at. Even have had a couple of pistols here at this forum who had metal burrs cause problems. Once taken care of the guns were back up and running.

Yes, there is a lot to consider and it looks like this will take one step at a time to figure this out.
 

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+1 for quick draw :thumb:

Care of guns and learning how to use them is sorely neglected. Mechanical things will develop problems if not care for. Thats why more people experience problems with semi autos then revolvers. More moveing parts and lots of them hidden.

Seeking out help seems like your not a guy, like asking for directions. I've learned more from someone watching me and providing input then I could ever learn by trial and error. Most of the time it's just little changes that make such a big difference. ;)
 
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