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The steak thread got me thinking about Pork. About 10 years ago I started cooking my pork to an internal temperature of 142 and then letting it rest for 10 minutes until it reaches 145. Used to and still does freak people out. The old mentality of cooking pork to 165 still lingers on.

If you have not tried pork cooked to 145 give it a try, the flavor and texture is just unbelievable. No no more cooked pork for me.

Note, wild hog still needs to be cooked to at least 165.
 

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we started doing the cook to 145 for pork about a year ago and the flavors that came from it were amazing. That naturally changes if I'm smoking it, then it goes to 205 to pull. If you want an amazing flavor for grilling chops, try Lawrys Seasoning Steak and Chop Marinade. The stuff give the chops an incredible flavor.
 

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Hogs are too susceptible to parasites for me to eat it undercooked.
 

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I really like those real thin cut pork chops cooked out on the grill. Browned on both sides to the point where there are dark crispy spots.
I buy 'em from HEB, the pre-seasoned ones. Ate one tonight..MMMMMM.
 

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I found a new way on the other end of the spectrum, I season with salt pepper and garlic powder and place it in a pan with about an inch of chicken broth in the bottom, cook at 300 till it reaches and internal temp of 185. Remove it from the oven and heat the oven to 450, place it back in for 20 to 25 minutes. It sears the outside and gives a nice crust. You can then make gravy out of the juices in the pan and it's awesome.
12175.jpeg
 

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For grilling pork, I use a dry rub. Bad Byron's Butt Rub to be exact. My Dad ran into the owners down in Port St Joe several years ago while on a fishing trip and he says they are good folks.

Besides, what's not to like about a company whose slogan is, "A Little Butt Rub Makes Everything Better"?

It works pretty good on chicken, too.
 

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Just finished up the pork that we cooked the other day. Pork Tenderloin cut into individual pieces then pounded out to 3/8 to 1/2 inch. Dipped in egg, then coated in saltine cracker crumbs that have been seasoned. Then heat up the cast iron skillet with about 3/4 of an inch of oil and fry the tenderloin to a nice light brown with darker edges. Pull out and allow the oil to drain onto a paper towel.

While the tenderloin is cooling, drop your French cut potatoes into the oil in the skillet and fry to a nice golden brown or lighter if you prefer.

Place a nice cut of Tenderloin on a hamburger bun, top with your preferred choice of condiments and dig in.

Never said that it was healthy, but it sure is GOOD to be bad.
 

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I only eat ham or the center loin, the white meat. I buy the whole center loin for $1.49 - $1.99 lbs. I get about 17- to 21 chops i hand cut just over one inch thick. I lightly garlic salt and pepper and cook @ 600°+ on a char broil infrared gas grill for four to six mins per side. It sears the meat so brown you think it's a strip steak. The high heat gets the inside temp high while the chop stays moist. I hate dry, hard, over cooked pork Frisbees. I leave most of the fat band on like you would a sirloin steak. Pork rind browns up nice as well.
 

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From my younger days I remember the biggest fear of eating under-cooked pork was trichinosis. According to the CDC, cooking to 145 degrees negates that threat.

https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/trichinellosis/prevent.html

Note the different temps for poultry and wild game. For poultry, the danger is salmonella.
 

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I too like the thinner chops breaded and fried. My wife calls them schnitzel, she adds a mushroom sauce that makes them Jaeger Schnitzel. Then she makes these pasty potato balls that have another German name and serves it with a red cabbage dish she calls Rot Kohl. To mix it up sometimes she makes it without the mushroom sauce, which makes it a Viener Schnitzel, and serves it with french fries she calls Pommes Fritz. There are a number of other variations, but you get the jest.

BTW, my wife says the German secret to cooking wild game, including wild boar, is to cook it in red wine.
 
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