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i just bought a kel-tec pf9 and wanted to polish up the feed ramp. i havent had a chance to take it out yet to see if it has any problems with feeding yet. should i just let it go if it works fine or should i just go ahead and do it? if/when i do it, should i use a certain grit sand paper or what? ive been spoiled in having my previous only semi-auto being a 24/7, and that ramp comes so polished i can see my face in it.
 

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I'd shoot it first. If you think the ramp needs polishing, the way I do it is to start by wrapping some 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper around a wooden dowel that's of a diameter maybe a little bigger than the round. I smooth going in line with the direction that the bullets will travel. Then hit it with 1000 grit the same way. I finish with a dremel tool and a #520 impregnated polishing wheel. I like the 520 wheels because the polishing compound is imbedded in the wheel so you don't have to mess with separate polish. As far as that's concerned though, you can use a conical felt wheel and rouge abrasive to do the job. But I don't polish just to make it shiny - if there isn't a problem I leave it alone.
 

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Agreed - shoot it first. Don't fix it, if it ain't broke, as they say.


It is easy to go too far with re-profiling/ polishing a feed ramp - an exacting job it is, to be sure. No reason to risk messing it up, if not truly necessary.
 

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i was definately leanign heavily towards shooting it first. i was just wondering if anyone just did it from the beginning. after all, they did design it that way. the one in my 24/7 was out of the box shiny and smooth
 

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I don't know why but people insist on using sandpaper to polish a feed ramp, but the correct way to do it is shoot 500 rounds or so to let the bullets smooth out the ramp. After that if you want you can use a polishing wheel and some compound but at a slow speed.
 

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I'm a proponent of shooting the gun first and only messing with the feed ramp if there are imperfections that impede function. Nothing smoothes out the ramp like a few hundred rounds of FMJ's running a groove into the chamber. But that's just my opinion, i could be wrong.
 

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I polish my regardless, preventive maintenance you can say. I don't do it everytime I go to the range just when I look at it and think it needs it. Hollow points seems to need it more then FMJ jmo
 

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The only feed-ramp I've ever polished before shooting was on a Para .45. It actually arrived with a painted ramp. Somebody evidently slipped up on the assembly line?
 

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If a gun is made properly, it shouldn't need anything to function properly, whether the so called "feed" ramp is polished or not. If you must polish it, use a felt wheel, a little polish, and go easy. We do not want to remove metal, just slick up the surface. Many guns are damaged by folks "polishing" the "feed" ramp.
 

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I don't know why but people insist on using sandpaper to polish a feed ramp, but the correct way to do it is shoot 500 rounds or so to let the bullets smooth out the ramp. After that if you want you can use a polishing wheel and some compound but at a slow speed.
I agree with that, and try to mix up what brand, and type of ammo you feed. That way you can find out what your gun likes.
 
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A good friend of mine posted the following in one of our local forums regarding "Feed Ramp Polishing". I saw pix of the gun after someone else did this and it is VERY sound advice.

"Danger - Caution
Do not polish an alloy frame ramp. It is most likely anodized (surface hardened) and polishing will remove this hardening, then the bullets will ding the surface as they are loaded. For $500 you can have a steel ramp installed by a pro gunsmith to repair the damaged frame."

Really screwed up the ramp and the gun stopped feeding anything. Up to that point it had been his favorite 1911 and it cost him just a tad over the $500 to have the frame milled out and a steel feed ramp put in by a professional gunsmith.
 

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I don't know why but people insist on using sandpaper to polish a feed ramp, but the correct way to do it is shoot 500 rounds or so to let the bullets smooth out the ramp. After that if you want you can use a polishing wheel and some compound but at a slow speed.
I cannot second the use of SLOW SPEED enough to get the point across to people that use a Dremel or similar. You will be shocked at how fast you can remove metal and change the angle of the ramp or dish out where you are holding the pad.

If a gun is made properly, it shouldn't need anything to function properly, whether the so called "feed" ramp is polished or not. If you must polish it, use a felt wheel, a little polish, and go easy. We do not want to remove metal, just slick up the surface. Many guns are damaged by folks "polishing" the "feed" ramp.
OMG, yes to that whole post. I see used 1911 barrels in bins for a dollar sometimes and you can see where they have been abused with polishing away the steel...

A good friend of mine posted the following in one of our local forums regarding "Feed Ramp Polishing". I saw pix of the gun after someone else did this and it is VERY sound advice.

"Danger - Caution
Do not polish an alloy frame ramp. It is most likely anodized (surface hardened) and polishing will remove this hardening, then the bullets will ding the surface as they are loaded. For $500 you can have a steel ramp installed by a pro gunsmith to repair the damaged frame."

Really screwed up the ramp and the gun stopped feeding anything. Up to that point it had been his favorite 1911 and it cost him just a tad over the $500 to have the frame milled out and a steel feed ramp put in by a professional gunsmith.
This is another one that seems like it should be more obvious but still I see dented and dinged up alloy feed ramps in used alloy frame 1911's all the time. I think it's Springfield Armory guns that most often had barrels with feed ramps built into them that had to be fitted to the cut out in the frames, but I may have the wrong brand. Whatever brand it is, most of them that have alloy frames have alloy feed ramps integral to the frame. It should be really obvious if you have a steel insert or the ramp is part of the barrel.
 

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I firmly believe in properly breaking in a semiauto "before" doing any tweeking on it's parts.

Polishing is just that, polishing...period, not metal removal, which changes angles and dynamics in play.

On feed ramps I use Mother's mag polish, a small felt buffing wheel, and a deft but light hand, and a Dremel tool.

You can polish the ramp to a mirror finish in just a very few minutes without removing metal.
 

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I'm going with
"If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
 

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I have a few hundred rounds through my PF9 and it's never failed to feed, fire, or eject - so I haven't bothered with polishing yet.

Keep in mind that Keltec will polish it and send it back to you, should you call them and set it up. I'm sure you have to pay for shipping, but if you have another gun to get you by, it might be something worth considering.

If you decide to do it yourself, I would very, very, lightly polish it with the softest Dremel polishing attachment I could find, with something like Mothers polish or maybe even the polish that Dremel provides.
 

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Whew! A lot of thoughts on polishing. I agree with gently, gently polishing without changing the shape.
Only once have I bought a gun that was painted, not polished. The factory fixed that. The gun is flawless.
Just shooting will mark the ramp and show where polishing will help. Dint never think o' that.
 

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shoot it first, don;t use a dremel more ramps are ruined with a dremel than improved. it only takes 30 seconds with a dremel to ruin a ramp.
 

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shoot it first, don;t use a dremel more ramps are ruined with a dremel than improved. it only takes 30 seconds with a dremel to ruin a ramp.
First of all there's a big difference in the ramp on an alloy framed 1911, and a barrel with an integral ramp like we're talking about. If you've got a barrel that's so soft that polishing with a dremel wheel will tear it up in thirty seconds, you've got bigger problems. I've used a dremel with a #520 wheel on many ramps, and I haven't torn one up yet. Not to say Schleprock couldn't do it, but like with anything else with guns, if you're not comfortable or knowledgeable enough to do the job then don't attempt it.
 

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Dbeardslee is more aggressive than I am on this. I use a felt wheel with white Jeweler Rouge and my Dremel, but it is for POLISHING only, no cutting (like sandpaper), no changing angles, no changing anything, just polishing. And I polish in both directions, if that question comes up. There are plenty of fluff and buff threads over on the Kel-Tec forums that can give you more specifics on what to polish and how on your pistol. The Kel-Tecs respond very well to fluff and buff treatment and if I had one that would be the first thing I would do to it, after I made sure it was broken in and operating the way it is supposed to. Don't start working on any pistol until you are sure it is operating at 100%.
 
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