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Do any of y'all practice point shooting as part of your training regimen? I try to do it as often as possible so that I can become more automatic in threat situations. Besides, Jeff Cooper was a big advocate of the style and I consider that a ringing endorsement. BTW, here is some good info I found on the subject which I hope will be useful:

What is Point Shooting?

Point shooting (also called threat focused shooting, incorrectly called reflexive shooting and sometimes both correctly and incorrectly associated with a flash sight picture) in its simplest form is shooting at close ranges while not being able to use your sights. This could be because of the speed of action, low-light conditions or because the scenario takes place in a confined space, but the last part—the part about not using the gun's sights—is crucial because this is what separates point shooting from other style.


The shooter literally does not aim the gun but rather uses a combination of good pistol grip technique, trigger pull and intuition/sight picture to hit the target. Accordingly, point shooting is not just a quick draw, though quick draws are a vital ingredient in point shooting. The resulting action is decidedly faster than drawing and aiming and with practice can become even more effective.

Accordingly, point shooting is a close quarters combat technique, most effective against targets within the seven-yard range.
Methods of Point Shooting

In his book No Second Place Winner, Bill Jordan likened point shooting's draw and hold components to tossing a knife underhanded. The gun hand and gun should end up outstretched and slightly above waist level. Jordan also stated that this type of shot is best for less than seven yards.

There are no hard and fast rules to point shooting, but there are a couple of well-known doctrines and they come to us from William Fairbairn, Eric A. Sykes and Rex Applegate, three of the earliest proponents of the tactic.

Called the Fairbairn, Sykes, and Applegate, the British Office of Strategic services commissioned the development of this method defense tactic in 1942. Rex Applegate would detail the methodology fuller in his 1943 classic self-defense primer, Kill or Get Killed.

Applegate’s school of thought essentially instructs shooters to:

  1. Bring the handgun up to a position just below the eye of the shooter.
  2. Locking the elbow and the wrist to ensure it is aimed on target.
  3. Rely on a smooth trigger pull to guarantee accuracy.
  4. The last step is crucial because much of Applegate's instruction on point shooting requires the shooter to develop a firm, consistent shooting position that they can assume consistently and without much, if any, thought.
For those that advocate the two-handed style of point shooting, such as the Israeli method, it can be effective, but the one-handed stance is faster to get on target once one gets good at it. To hit targets not in front of the shooter, Applegate advises turning at the waist and not moving the arms like a tank moving on its turret.
Practicing Point Shooting


The National Rifle Association (NRA) recognizes the use of point shootings in life-threatening situations where the body's natural reaction to close quarters threats may prevent meeting the marksmanship requirements of sight shooting and with an endorsement like that, I feel point shooting is something that all defensive shooters should know (and in this case knowing means practice). As mentioned, point shooting hinges on instinct and instincts take time to cultivate through repetition and the best way to practice point shooting, like any other potentially dangerous tactical technique, is with an unloaded and empty handgun.

  1. Draw from your normal open or concealed carry position (hip, off-hand shoulder, ankle etc.).
  2. Lock hands and wrists towards target
  3. Pull the trigger just when you have the muzzle aimed at the target (and held just below the eye to give you a flash picture)
  4. Practice this 100 times
Each repetition should take less than a second. When you feel confident about the drawing, aiming and firing techniques, you can go live ammo, just start off slower than the first round of practice. Remember, only set up targets at about seven yards and if you are having trouble hitting this, there is no shame in moving the target forward (this is s CQC exercise).

Point shooting is becoming a lost art in some circles, most law enforcement agencies have shied away from it preferring to rely on aimed fire, which of course is necessary. But it does not hurt to look back at a proven method of gunfighting that once was a school of thought among many of the top pistol shooters in the country. It kept many a soldier and lawman alive in the day, and it can help you too.

Source: Guns, Gun News, Gun Reviews - Blog Articles on the Gun World at Guns.com
 

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I practice point shooting to 5 yards with my TCP 380, from different standing, sitting, kneeling, and laying positions.

The laser has come in real handy to help build technique and accuracy. I also practice with the laser light covered up with black tape as I don’t want to have to rely on having it.
 

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I practice point shooting for those up close encounters.
 

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Good post, thanks
 

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I do not rely nor practice point shooting. That wasnt always the case though. I usedto think pointshooting was the wayto go. Until a buddy of mine attended a course in defensive handgunning. It was a four day course and on the very first range session on the first day the instructors identified the point shooters with aspeed drill. Lomg story short, it was made clear that point shooting can be effective and accurate at 1 to 2.5 yards but beyondthat in a SD situation where you are under complete duress it was proven to all of them to be virtually inneffective. However the flash front site method proved most effective in the close quarters simulator and in the man to man speed drills. Of course these students were taught this by highly trained professionals who also made it possible for these students to draw and place 2 center mass shots in under 2 seconds with their methods. All inall the school comes highly recommended and I willbe attending one of their clsses come august. I cant wait.

In the mean time I dont knock point shooting, I just determined thatthismethod that was passed on to me. Iwould never tell somone to stop practicing what they feel works for them. But please remember only perfect practice makes perfect, anyother practice only makes you an anyother shooter. I only passed this on because my buddy was an avid point shooter and he was really good, but to see his attitude changed after this course and to see how much more accurate and faster he was made me a believer too.

BTW the classes are from a company called Frontsight located in Nevada.
 

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Didn't know there was a difference between "point shooting" and "flash sight." I do both but called it the same thing, I start my session with point shooting from the hip at a range of 5 yards aiming for center mass. Then progress to flash sight two eyes opened at a range of 7 yards aiming for head. Slow fire to start then come back to these two methods when closing out my session and do quick succession double taps. From strictly a range point of view the "flash sight" would be most likely the method I employ in a fire fight unless the BG was able to reach out and touch me, then no other method but hip shooting could be employed, best believe Ill be plugging lead in the CQC hip point shooting till I ran out of bullets.. Something about shooting someone in the gut doesn't seem to be a "one hitter quitter" in an adrenaline fueled mugging. That's why I also practice the flash sight method. More lethality IMO, If I can get off the head shots.. Some might say hoping for shooting someone in the head at the range and then IRL is a long stretch from actually happening, but by god im gonna damn well try. Who's to say that the previous stated is my definitive answerer, perhaps if the situation ever does arise I won't have any opportunity at all.. luck of the draw one might say.
 

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While I would not rely on point shooting 100% of the time, there could a need for it, better to practice and be prepared.
 

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I combine point shooting with what I call snap-shooting. Get the gun on target ASAP (no sights) and pull the trigger multiple times.
 

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On my last trip to the range I tried point shooting my Ruger SP101.
Five rounds and all within the siloughette, but only two shots close to center mass. (Hopefully, that one very low shot got the BGs femoral artery and he bled quickly enough to pass out...)
Obviously, I need to do this more often and do it with a variety of guns.

And since flash sighting has been mentioned, it seems pertinent to point everyone to this old thread:

http://www.taurusarmed.net/forums/concealed-open-carry/25921-how-flash-sight-pistol.html
 
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