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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
"Point Shooting" / "Reflex Shooting" / "Snap Shooting"......a unique perspective

I have begun to progress in my shooting style beyond the basics....that is, the basics of stance, grip and control are becoming natural to me....so I am looking beyond those things. I am much more of a "combat - style" shooter than "target shooter"......and frankly, target style shooting with a handgun (especially off a rest) doesn't much interest me.

So, I have begun to look at different techniques - as a method toward continuing to improve my skills (which will ALWAYS be needed). The (now) old-style "point shooting" / "reflexive shooting" / "snap shooting" methods are getting my attention.....as they seem the most natural. I'm not sure how many of you are up on the latest trends, or pay attention to such details, but this technique is now considered rather "old-school" by many in the shooting sport - and NOT practiced (as indicated by by what I have read) by any of the top combat-style shooters anymore. Tournament shooting, though interesting to me, is not my focus at all, however - I simply wish to be as skilled as I can be, as a point of interest, if not pride, in doing things well.

There is another reason for my keen interest in this so-called "old-fashioned" technique, as well - the "unique perspective" to which I alluded in the title of this thread. That reason is EYESIGHT. I am over 50 now, with the usual degradation in my sight as suffered by most of us geezers. (Sorry if I offend - OK.....I AM the geezer....the rest of you 50-plus guys are still strapping lads !) I find that I am having trouble with the sights on my guns. This is exactly why I gave up iron sights on my rifles, a few years ago. Believe me, that was a painful experience - I have always favored iron sights, at least out to reasonable distances - and giving up on them was very difficult for me. I even developed a rather unique design for the irons on my rifles, to allow me to continue with them a while longer. I eventually lost that battle, though.

I took up handgun shooting only about a year ago, because I was tired of what I consider to be the over- formal process of shooting my rifle and developing loads.....adjusting the scope, etc. I desired a more NATURAL, more FUN and LESS formal style of shooting. Handguns ("combat- style") have filled that niche nicely. That is why I hardly shoot my Mauser anymore. But, my eyes are trying (again) to RUIN the experience. DARN EYES !

So, I have taken to working up a (perhaps somewhat) unique style. Really, I doubt that it is unique at all, but for MY particular context, it is. That is the "point / reflexive / snap" shooting method. Basically the same method - but I have heard it referred to by each of the three names, at various times. I prefer "reflexive shooting", myself - because that is what I am trying to achieve - accurate shooting as if almost by reflex, rather than conscious effort.
As such, my method is simple. ("Simplicity".....my favorite word and ideal for all areas of life !)

****The bloody, ^%$#&^%^* thing timed out, while I was finishing my post. So, I'll have to re-construct it below. D&^%IT !!! *****





The technique involves simply focusing on the TARGET beyond - not so much the front sight - as is normal shooting doctrine. This allows me to get around the limitations of my eyes - at least out to 15 yards, so far. Of course, I do practice the fundamentals - CONTROL, KNOWING MY GUN and PROPER TECHNIQUE. But, the effort here is to make it all 2nd nature, so to speak - even lining up the sights - so no conscious effort is required.

Anybody else have the same issues....and try the same "techniques" ? An obvious question - probably many of you do. I am already seeing dividends from this. Hopefully, that will continue.

Thanks for listening.....and sorry about the wordy post.
 

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I practice that type of shooting with my CC pistol and Home Defense weapons. I start with a target at or near contact range. Since the ranges I shoot at will not allow drawing from the holster, I lay the pistol on the bench, turn away from it, and then turn back, picking up the pistol quickly and firing three to five rounds at the center mass of a torso target. I do this with each hand and work on getting my shots as close to the center of the chest as possible. I then move the target back a yard or two and repeat the exercise. I work it back to the 10 yd point, running 3 to five rounds each time. I do not aim the gun, I simply pick it up and fire as quickly as possible after getting the muzzle pointed down range. If I were able to do this exercise with the holster, I would draw and shoot as quickly as possible after the muzzle clears the holster and is pointed at the target. To keep it from becoming boring, I score my sessions. 5 points for the 10 ring, and two points for the 9 ring, and 1 point for the 8. I just keep the total score on an index card in my range bag.
 

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Instinctive point shooting is still a viable option today. It is still very fast and effective at close range and with a properly zeroed laser site just about anyone can be accurate with it.
I guess the laser would be "cheating" by standard point shooting theory, but if this is to be used defensively why not use all the tools available.

The laser could also be used in a "dry fire" training situation to test your aim.



For us shooters getting up in age and losing the eagle eyes we once had, try something like these.

Look into XS big dot sights - XS Sight Systems - Sights

and

the fiber optic sites like the truglo TFO's Products and Services | TRUGLO, Inc.

Both styles can help make the sights easier to see.
They do not work for everyone, but many people like them.

Edited to add: Using a laser allows you to keep your eyes on the target since your focus is on the red or green dot is on the target, and not on the front sight of your gun.
 

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G&Ns beat me to it. Aside from 'old eyes', I recently had 3 laser surgeries for detached retinas in both eyes. My distance vision is pretty good, but my biggest problem is up close, and depth of field. If focused on the front sight, I can see the blurry target, but can't hardly see the rear sights at all. If I focus on the target, I can't hardly see the sights. I try to 'point shoot', and find that a fiber optic, or even the contrast of a small Tritium helps. While still fairly new, I find that I shoot the Sig P238 almost the best, due to its over sized dots. I spend most of my range time shooting without wearing my glasses, because I figure if I ever do need to defend myself, I won't be wearing them anyway. I'm still waiting for somebody to make the 'super sized, handicapped' sights, with included braille instruction book. :D
 

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Last outing with my Ruger SP101 I tried shooting from the hip - well, not exactly from the him since the shelf at my indoor range is a bit too high for that. But I did push the gun a ways out from my body, holding it way to low to make use of the sights, looking only at the BG target.
Got all five shots on paper, three of them within the siloughette. Obviously I need a lot more practice.

Here are some tips:

Point Shooting - Colonel Rex Applegate - Sykes - Fairbairn - bobtuley.com Real World Gunfights Happen At Close Range
 

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The last class I took, the RO, and the instructor, kept telling me to stop tilting my head when I was shooting two handed. I told them to try that with my Bifocals and see how they can do. To see the sights, I have to get the bifocal out of the way, so the tilt does that for me.

I have to have glasses to see to walk, drive, and read, so adjusting to them in shooting has come natural to me. If I did not tilt, it feels so stiff, and I sure cannot aim correctly with my head up.
 

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The last class I took, the RO, and the instructor, kept telling me to stop tilting my head when I was shooting two handed. I told them to try that with my Bifocals and see how they can do. To see the sights, I have to get the bifocal out of the way, so the tilt does that for me.
I have to do the same thing with my progressive tri-focals if I want a crisp view of the sights. :(
 

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I'm a fan of "point" shooting since my guns all have fuzzy sights now. If I can glimpse the top of the gun (barrel or slide) I can shoot pretty well at 3 to 5 yards at a man sized target in rapid fire.
 

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I'm with the bad eye group and have always practiced point shooting. My Dad a ex LEO taught it to me and it just stuck. I find out to 10 yards I'm pretty much good to go.
 
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