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One thing I have noticed the other day when I went shooting was that when shooting objects on the ground, I was much less accurate than when shooting objects at distance that were level with my shooting position. Is there a secret to shooting things on the ground at closer distances or do I just need more practice?
 

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I'd say more practice really, the sight angle is different than what you're accustomed to so your sight picture is changed ever so slightly.
 

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I'd say more practice really, the sight angle is different than what you're accustomed to so your sight picture is changed ever so slightly.
I agree, any shooting position needs to be repeated often
 

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One thing I have noticed the other day when I went shooting was that when shooting objects on the ground, I was much less accurate than when shooting objects at distance that were level with my shooting position. Is there a secret to shooting things on the ground at closer distances or do I just need more practice?
When you say you were shooting more accurately at longer ranges, and judging by your wording, can I assume that what you were saying is that you could hit your targets at farther ranges, and had more misses at shorter ranges? It depends a lot on caliber selection too. Every bullet has a mid-range trajectory. For a 230 gr. 45 ACP at 25 yards it can be as much as 3". For 9mm it will be around half that. If the round is on target at 25 yards, and you move it significantly closer, then your poi is going to be a little high. It's not enough to make much difference as far as SD accuracy is concerned, but if the object that's laying on the ground is something like an egg it could be enough to get you off target.

And as has already been mentioned, sight alignment is always critical. It's virtually impossible for a weapon to be more accurate at longer ranges than at shorter ranges, so it comes down to what the bullet is doing, and how you're aligning the sights in relation to the barrel of the weapon and the target. It can also be very difficult to actually see where you're hitting when you're shooting at something like a tin can as opposed to paper. Even when you see dirt fly, it's not always flying from the point where the bullet initially impacted. The only way to really tell where it's hitting is to shoot some paper at those shorter ranges.

The other thing that happens when you shoot uphill or downhill is that the strike of the round will be slightly higher due to the less perpendicular force of gravity acting on the bullet. That's more of an issue with rifles than with pistols, and it's effect on a pistol round is going to be less noticeable. At any rate it needs to be a fairly steep slope for that to be really noticeable, and I just mention it in passing.
 

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Strange conversation as I've always been able to hit a small object at much farther distances, like shotgun hulls or golf balls. I thought it was just easier for me to focus on an object than a two dimensional target. Maybe it is because I grew up shooting tin cans, rabbits, bottles, shotgun shell hulls, Bodarck (Bois'de'arc) apples most of which were usually on the ground...so perhaps that would explain why I'm rotten shooting paper. :) You may be just more used to shooting paper targets than you are shooting things at all kinds of angles.
 
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Thanks guys! I will put out paper and see what I was doing. I was shooting at cans, gongs, bottles, all kinds of things, so paper should do the explaining - thanks for the ideas!
 

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Shooting smaller, forces you to unconsciously concentrate harder on your shot. A former SWAT instructor taught me the same philosphy about shooting with one hand.
 

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I think that when you shoot at something on the ground your target sight shrink dramatically, like if you hold a 8x11 target in front of you, you have a full 11" target but if you lay it down your eyes will only be able to see about 3" of the target height because the target is at an angle to your sight picture that why a miss on the ground will be greater then a miss straight on, in other word a 2" flyer on a head on target will probably be 12" on the ground, now if you were able to elongate your target to were your eye perceives it the same as a circle you would probably need at least a 8x24 sheet or somewhere abouts just look at a school crossing road signs they are very elongated so that your eye can perceive them as shorter. I think it's normal for it to be more difficult to hit thing that are on the ground
 

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Thanks guys! I will put out paper and see what I was doing. I was shooting at cans, gongs, bottles, all kinds of things, so paper should do the explaining - thanks for the ideas!
Glad you clarified that! I thought you were shooting at the ground in front of you at rocks and such -- great way to create a ricochet injury!
 
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