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Discussion Starter #1
Over the last several months I've been working with an instructor/coach to improve my shooting - in the process we've been modifying my shooting stance.

One change is to get my right arm *very* straight - elbow locked in fact - but that's causing pain in my ulnar nerve (funny bone). This worries me because it appears the only limit to my accuracy/group sizes is that arm. If I don't get the elbow good and straight, my vertical 'hold' is weak and causes my groups to pattern in a vertical line. With the recent change, my groups are about 30% larger, including horizontal spreading.

I have a friend who is a physical therapist and he suggested a few exercises - I'll see if that helps some.

Mostly just grousing but if anyone has had similar problems and has worked a solution, I'd be interested in hearing about it.
 

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Well, I had and still have on occasion pain in the right arm, and shoulder. After physical therapy, and continued treatment by a Chiropractor I have a lot less pain. But mine did not develop due to shooting, but due to pinched nerves in the neck. Sometimes you need to look beyond the initial place you notice the pain, and what might be an underlying cause.
 

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man its your guns,you need to get new ones and it would'nt hurt to just give them to me.so pm me and i will give you my address.lol
 

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Maybe there's some wisdom in the old one liner: "It hurts when I do this, Doc." Docs response, "Then don't do it."

Seriously, the mass of your gun and your arm are serving as the launching pad for the bullet. Your cartilage is absorbing much of that energy. We are all built a little different. You could start lifting weights to increase your muscle mass and bone density. But, that seems like a truly odd motivation to start pumping iron. You might try a brace, but who is going to walk around with a brace on their wrist or elbow is case they need to pull their gun?

When I take my PT145 and 24/7 45 ACP out for practice, the PT145 gives my elbow a real jolt. It is not painful, but I can feel it in the same place you do. I don't feel it at all with the 24/7. No doubt the extra mass of the 24/7 is enough to make a difference.

Here's my two cents: What you are doing hurts. The pain you feel is your body telling you to stop what you are doing. Add to that your groupings are now 30% larger. If it were me having the problem, I would find what works for me without the pain.
 

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Perhaps a physician who specializes in sports medicine? A brace?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It looks like adopting an isoceles stance makes the difference. I was also putting a bit too much tension between my grip hand and my support hand.

Thanks for the feedback.

(posted from my cell phone during a school concert - during a break)
 

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I have that discomfort and even occasional pain in my elbow and funny bone too - I've often wondered if I have some bone spurs or floaters or something. I only notice it if I work out, or if I am throwing a baseball or football for a long period of time. It goes away after a couple of days, but it bothers me.
 

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That is what they call tennis elbow. Try a brace first. If it is bad the only thing to fix it is surgery, they move the nerve away from the slot in the bones of your elbow.
 

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Could you be hyper extending your elbow? Its something that I can do fairly easy with my knees and a little bit with my elbows. By hyper extending I mean bending your joint past the point where the limb is a straight line.

I did manage to find a pic of someone with an elbow like this. Yes, it looks a little gross but I used to know a girl who's elbows went over twice as far... my elbows are barely noticeable (unlike my knees).
http://sports.webshots.com/photo/1320284137067436676IKoAvt

If you are hyper extending your elbows the recoil energy would be transmitted to the joint and the joint would be out of position to absorb it the way it was designed to.

When I shoot my right (strong side) arm is almost totally straight. Or it could be considered to be straight but not hyper extended.

Steelheart
 

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Since you are locking your elbow, it would seem to me that, as has been stated, your cartilage is absorbing quite a bit of the recoil energy.* Maybe the answer is a shooting glove. this would absorb much of the energy before it was transferred to your arm. You would probably want to do some shooting without it at each range session, but it might allow you to expend more ammo working on your stance and form.

*I am not a doctor, although I have played one on video.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Actually the isosceles stance seems to reduce the strain on my elbow quite nicely - partly because I can get a more natural extension of my arms without the added tension at the shoulder that the Weaver stance was requiring. Years ago I actually used the isosceles stance to good effect, but drifted away from it for various reasons, partly in search of 'the perfect' shooting stance... but I was then trying to do it without a coach.

Shooting, like golf, sometimes needs the experienced eye of a pro to improve your game.
 

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K P,
I never lock my elbows. It is uncomfortable and from a quik draw seems slower. Look at this video of some USPSA shooters and notice most of these folks to not lock either of there elbows. I like the more square stance and have a slight bend at the elbows. This seems both to be more comfortable and accurate for me. If I am shooting my .44 revolver then I use an offset type stance with my left shoulder leading my right. Even with the large revolver I do not lock either of my elbows.

http://www.uspsa.org/USPSA_Videos/index.html
 
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