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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a schedule for springs to be replaced? Or are they meant to be run to failure? Which parts are susceptible to wear? I'm thinking of the recoil spring and the magazine springs. I wish replacement magazine followers were available but they aren't. Are there any other parts that need to be replaced?

The manual is silent on the matter, and "run to failure" seems plausible since springs don't suddenly fail for the most part. My PT809 has served us very well for almost 2500 rounds, and there seem to be no issues at the moment. I can order the springs now, of course, but I was hoping for advise on when to install them.
 

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I change out my 1911 recoil spring every 5000 rounds or so. We are talking a $10 spring here. My mags have been going with the same spring since the 90's, but I don't use the same one every time. I rotate about six of them thru the gun.
 

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If you think about it, a magazine spring would only be completely exercised for 1 of every 7, 8, 15, 17 times (depending upon capacity) of the number of times the recoil spring is exercised, then if you use two magazines for say a PT145, that means the magazines only get exercised 1/21 as often as the recoil spring, and if you have 4 magazines, only 1/41.

I suspect more magazine springs are damaged by cleaning and re-assembly than ever wear out.

To the original post, the recoil spring is the most likely part to need replacing other than defective parts that may have been installed on a handgun. I think you can tell when a recoil spring is loosing it's spring by the way the pistol feels when you fire it. I would think you would start feeling a hard knock at the end of the recoil cycle.

Firing pins take the force of blunt force trauma more than nearly any other part in a firearm. I would not suggest replacing a firing pin prior to failure, because you have a proven firing pin already in the gun. You never know what you have in a replacement part until is has a decent track record. Still, I have began ordering firing pins when I am ordering other parts for my firearms just to help defray shipping costs. There are a lot of small inexpensive parts you can order if you have to order a part that you can figure you might need at some point in the future.

I have enough guns that I can go to others for personal protection if one is down waiting for a part. Most likely, whatever I needed a part for would be my favorite truck gun or favorite house gun as those are the ones I shoot the most.

There are a lot of guns I don't have parts for, but I'm thinking I need to keep a certain number of parts for what I would consider my main guns for various purposes.
 
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Like Jake said, you should notice stuff happening if a spring is failing.

I don't have an 809, but I'd do what I do for a 1911 and just keep one handy. Chances are they are not going to catastrophically fail and will just wear out slowly over time. That just my 2 cents.
 

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If you start to notice the gun is slamming back against the frame instead of cycling smoothly as it was designed, then it would probably be in your best interest to get a set. As far as mags go, you get good ones and bad ones. If you have a good one, they'll outlast the gun. If you get bad ones, you'll have problems from the start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone for your input. How should the gun feel exactly when the spring is wearing out? At around how many rounds does that occur?

How does the firing pin fail - does it just fracture, or does it slowly get blunt and/or chipped? If it gets chipped, I should change it immediately to avoid puncturing the primer?
 

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I cannot tell you that. But if I remember my classes in college regarding springs, correctly. I depends alot on how quickly you fire the weapon. Rapid compression/decompression springs will last about 40% as long as slow compression/ decompression. Length of movement of the springs counts as well. ie if you have a 17 round mag and you load it with 10, spring will last a lot longer than if you have a 17 round mag and load it with 17. I have a 24/7 17 round mag, with over 1600 rounds through it. All i need for it is a rear sight screw!
 

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