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Hey,

I've been bitten by the bug. Again. :)

I want a .357 and I have a line on a nice older Taurus Model 66. It was made in 1990 and has the blued finish, 3" bbl, wood grips, and the adjustable sight.

Then I got to wondering if I might be better off buying a new(er) Model 66.

Can any of you folks speak to the quality of the older Mod. 66s as compared to the newer versions? Let's assume the older and newer are in equal, excellent condition.

I know nothing about when Taurus made changes in this model. I spent a few hours looking for info but came up pretty dry.

I do know that on the 1990 I'm interested in that the firing pin transfer bar is in the frame, not on the hammer and the cylinder is not recessed.

Not a lot to go on, sorry.

I know there are a lot of 66 guys here. I'd love to know what your thinking is on this.

And, as always, thanks.

mikem
 

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Make sure you check it thoroughly, if it is in good working order buy it!.....................
 
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Trade offs, buddy. Older model is likely to have a nice blued gun, if you look hard enough, and a very classic style 357 mag. The newer gives you another round, 7 shots, but the gun is only offered in stainless and a matted black finish. It depends on what is important to you. I personally love my newer 66 stainless.
 
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Do the revolver checkout for sure! If it passes, then I believe that buying it would be reasonable (if the price is reasonable). The photo sure makes it look like a well cared for revolver. I do like that deep blued finish. You won't find that on any of the new models. I have a new 66 4" in SS and find it to be a very nice revolver and believe that many others feel the same way.
Personally, I would buy the blued '90s 66 (if it checks out AND the price is reasonable)! You will able to buy a newer one later, if you desire.
Flex
 

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I really like 3" .357 Magnums, but I wouldn't afraid to really scrutinize a used M66. Make sure that when the hammer's back the cylinder locks tight with minimum play. Definitely check the forcing cone to make sure that it's cut square to the cylinder face with no wavy lines. Inspect the bore but judging from the drag line on the cylinder, it doesn't appear to have been fired much.

Advantage for new would only be models made on CNC machines, and personally, I'd go stainless. But it's been some years since they made 3" M66 versions and another plus for the used model, IMO, is that it's a 6 shooter rather than 7.;)
 

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If you can pick it up for around $270.00 to $300.00, buy it....................
 
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I really like 3" .357 Magnums, but I wouldn't afraid to really scrutinize a used M66. Make sure that when the hammer's back the cylinder locks tight with minimum play. Definitely check the forcing cone to make sure that it's cut square to the cylinder face with no wavy lines. Inspect the bore but judging from the drag line on the cylinder, it doesn't appear to have been fired much.

Advantage for new would only be models made on CNC machines, and personally, I'd go stainless. But it's been some years since they made 3" M66 versions and another plus for the used model, IMO, is that it's a 6 shooter rather than 7.;)
The forcing cone is a good call. While I shot a lot of 357 mag out of my new Model 66, in two years the forcing cone was not only toast, it developed a crack. Further, perhaps it just the photo, but the bluing shows a lack of the luster one would expect from a polished and blued gun. The Model 66 I bought was a new model with the Krylon black finish which mars very easily; as other have said, if you are going new, I would recommend you go stainless
 

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If the 1990 model is priced right, you can likely recover your cost easier than selling the new model that’s slightly used at its new price.
Plus, nice looking 29 year old revolvers get harder and harder to find.
 
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