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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Collecting old shells and ammo is beginning to be a hobby for me. The way the older ammo was made can be very interesting. Someday I'm going to build a shadow box to display them in.
I was given this box of 12 gauge slugs the other day and am very interested in the history behind them. I'm hoping there might be some folks out there that knows any info about how long ago these were made and any thing on the manufacturer.
 

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Western Cartridge Co. of Alton Ill. became a division of Winchester-Western Ammunition Co, after WWII. Winchester moved their entire ammunition production to Alton and continued the Western Super X line as well as their own Winchester Super Speed line. hence the later combined head stamp of "W-W Super" used until very late in the 20th century when the company changed the head stamp to WINCHESTER on cases heads large enough and shortened it to WIN on smaller cases, such as 9MM.
Look in the small print on the box and see if Winchester is named anywhere, if it is then you will know they are post war production. Narrows it a little.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Western Cartridge Co. of Alton Ill. became a division of Winchester-Western Ammunition Co, after WWII. Winchester moved their entire ammunition production to Alton and continued the Western Super X line as well as their own Winchester Super Speed line. hence the later combined head stamp of "W-W Super" used until very late in the 20th century when the company changed the head stamp to WINCHESTER on cases heads large enough and shortened it to WIN on smaller cases, such as 9MM.
Look in the small print on the box and see if Winchester is named anywhere, if it is then you will know they are post war production. Narrows it a little.



Ha, I should have known you would know about these. That's what I like about this forum, it's filled with information and folks kind enough to share.
Thanks, guesser!
 

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I feel dumb..... I used go to the lgs and buy his loose shotgun shells and go shoot them. I can remember shooting half a box of hi brass and paper shot shells...... I was 16 and poor as my only defense....
 
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I still have some 40 year old peters 12ga paper shells from dad,kind of a momento.
 
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I have a Winchester Model 1912, 16 ga, pump shotgun. Prior to about 1920, 16 ga. was 2 9/16th" long, this gun dates to third year production, 1915, and has the short chamber and ejection port. I used it as a kid with shells readily available even after the production of 2 3/4" shells. The shorter shells were still on the shelves. When plastic shells came on the scene in the 50's the short shells were dropped. I have collected a lifetime supply of the short 16 ga. shells, W-W was the last to stop production in this country. Kynoch, in Britain went on making them. I have a good supply of them also. I like the old boxes, I had quite an accumulation, note: I did not say collection; but have started selling them off as there was getting to be too much. It is surprising what some of the old items will bring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Western Cartridge Co. of Alton Ill. became a division of Winchester-Western Ammunition Co, after WWII. Winchester moved their entire ammunition production to Alton and continued the Western Super X line as well as their own Winchester Super Speed line. hence the later combined head stamp of "W-W Super" used until very late in the 20th century when the company changed the head stamp to WINCHESTER on cases heads large enough and shortened it to WIN on smaller cases, such as 9MM.
Look in the small print on the box and see if Winchester is named anywhere, if it is then you will know they are post war production. Narrows it a little.


These have no "Winchester" stamped on them at all, so I assume these are pre or during WW ll. I find this kind of history really interesting.
 

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Actually some old ctgs. are worth a LOT of money.
I've seen authentic old Sharps ctgs. sell for a lot of money.
Cartridge collecting is a fasinating aspect of the firearms community.
 
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