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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend's dad passed on recently and the boys were puzzled over the closet find. They didn't know their dad had ever owned a gun, but here was this old rusty 12 gauge hiding in the back of the bedroom closet.

Eventually it will end up as a wall hanging. What the heck is it? Any clues out there?
Wood Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Shotgun Tool

It weighs 7 lbs., but I suspect that some of the wood is missing. The barrel measures at 30+ inches, material at the muzzle is feathered and not squared.
Wood Bumper Auto part Tool Hand tool

The scary part is that it can still shoot. I told Chad I'd hold his beer if he wants to try it out.
Wood Tool Shotgun Gun accessory Metal


Wood Tool Artifact Knife Auto part

Other than a few assembly and number stamps, this is the only other markings.
Handwriting Automotive tire Wood Helmet Rim
 

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A friend's dad passed on recently and the boys were puzzled over the closet find. They didn't know their dad had ever owned a gun, but here was this old rusty 12 gauge hiding in the back of the bedroom closet.

Eventually it will end up as a wall hanging. What the heck is it? Any clues out there?
View attachment 488006
It weighs 7 lbs., but I suspect that some of the wood is missing. The barrel measures at 30+ inches, material at the muzzle is feathered and not squared.
View attachment 488007
The scary part is that it can still shoot. I told Chad I'd hold his beer if he wants to try it out.
View attachment 488008

View attachment 488009
Other than a few assembly and number stamps, this is the only other markings.
View attachment 488010
Generally, because of the long barrel I would call it an old British fowling piece. But 30" isn't a long barrel by some standards. I have seen pictures of barrels several inches longer. Cool gun. Thanks for posting.
 

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De Tulle made lots of long guns,,Can't find A similar breech for more info. Sorry.
 
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its a french zulu musket conversion . i have one (in about the same shape as yours ), passed down from my grandmothers father . he lived on the Indian river in Florida in the late 1890`s . lot of history ,but not worth a lot as a collectors piece ----------

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
its a french zulu musket conversion . i have one (in about the same shape as yours ), passed down from my grandmothers father . he lived on the Indian river in Florida in the late 1890`s . lot of history ,but not worth a lot as a collectors piece ----------

Bingo! You win an imaginary cigar.

I just got back from Simpson's. Bob, said this one had Dutch markings and yes it was a considered to be a Zulu conversion. I guess the Brits were a bit miffed when the Zulus were allowed to have firearms. The Brits allowed them shotguns only.

This one is an interesting piece. Nice enough to hang on my wall. I'd even hold your beer if you want to try shooting it.
 
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mine is missing the firing pin , front bead , and the bore looks like sewer pipe . gotta` love black powder , might of been kind of safe when they were first reworked ----
 
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Bingo! You win an imaginary cigar.

I just got back from Simpson's. Bob, said this one had Dutch markings and yes it was a considered to be a Zulu conversion. I guess the Brits were a bit miffed when the Zulus were allowed to have firearms. The Brits allowed them shotguns only.

This one is an interesting piece. Nice enough to hang on my wall. I'd even hold your beer if you want to try shooting it.
Simpsons? I love that place. Got a Model 19 from there.

Don't see why you couldn't tie it to the picnic table and wrap a string around the trigger. Would be a nice addition to the 4th of July festivities.
 

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70gr of FFg and an equal volume of shot is standard for a 12 gauge BP load. That's a 'square load' and a good starting point. If the pattern is donut shaped (a ring of shot with a hole in the center), the wad's blowing through the center, so drop the powder charge 5 or 10gr at a time until it goes away.

In an antique- THAT HAS BEEN INSPECTED BY A GUNSMITH KNOWLEDGEABLE IN ANTIQUES OF A SIMILAR NATURE- I'd drop the charge to 50gr max and maybe even go to Fg if some's available. Oh, and those charges are with GOEX or one of the other brands of REAL BP, not a sub. Shot charge would also be dropped down to, say, 7/8 or 3/4 ounce.

Then again, you gotta get the chamber cast to see what the hull needs to look like, too. There's a LOT of variants to '12 gauge' and old guns have longer forcing cones. You can chamber a 2 3/4" hull in some 2 1/2" chambered guns- and that's American made late 19th or early 20th Century guns, too. You won't like the results, but it will fit.

You'll need fiber wads. Contact Circle Fly- they will have what you need or can make it. hulls, if modern rims and case heads will fit, can be trimmed down. With BP, you'll probably only get 1 or 2 uses per hull since BP tends to burn through eventually.
 
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Simpsons? I love that place. Got a Model 19 from there.

Don't see why you couldn't tie it to the picnic table and wrap a string around the trigger. Would be a nice addition to the 4th of July festivities.
Maybe because he doesn't want to blow up an old gun just for giggles.
 
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.... says the guy providing detailed instructions on how to shoot it. :ROFLMAO:
With the caveat that it was inspected and cleared by a knowledgeable professional prior to shooting. :whistle: 😝
 
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Forgot about crimping!

If you don't have a shot shell reloader to do the standard star crimp, get with Ballistics Products. They have a roll crimper that chucks in a drill and use a card wad (I don't like the over shot wads- too flimsy- and just use a over powder wad on the top instead) over the shot charge. Leave about 1/4 inch between the top of the wad and the rim of the hull.

For plastic hulls, put the crimper on the mouth of the hull and hold it there. Once it warms up enough from friction, it will soften the plastic and fold it right over. The first ones take a while, but after the first dozen or so shells, it's as fast as you can swap the hulls.
 
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Well the dragoons in Texas carried those in the Mexican-American War didn't they? :LOL:
Probably, if the US Government had enough spares to outfit them all, Hall carbines. The Hall-North carbine was developed for a regiment of dragoons raised for frontier duty.

In the case of the Texas Rangers, a pair of Walker Colts and a breechloading, percussion fired, Hall carbine would have been an impressive amount of firepower for a unit that size during that time period.

Walkers were the most powerful revolver made in the US until the Single Action Army in 1873 and can, depending on exactly how it's loaded, surpass the .45 Colt on paper. Considering they are capable of holding a BP powder charge normally found in rifle rounds or shotguns, it really shouldn't come as a surprise. Even today, a Walker replica can tread on the heels on the low end .44Mag loads (and not the .44Special load in a Magnum case stuff either) with the right powder..
 
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