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Yeap, I really do need to spout off, not once but two times. I would appreciate your sharing of impute if you would please.

We have a very high mineral content in the water here at the house. So over the last number of years I have a couple of bathrooms that simply don't get frequent usage and have accumulated mineral build up at the diverter on the bath tub spout.

In doing a little online research I have found that there are two basic designs of bathtub spouts. One is a screw on, the other slips on and then is secured with a set screw. So in theory to remove the tub spout you would either loosen the set screw and the spout should slide off by pulling forward. Or you will simply unscrew in a counter clock direction the screw on spout.

Using the camera on my phone I was able to look under the spout and can see no set screw, so I assume that what I have is the screw on design. I have tried wearing leather ranch gloves for a secure grip and attempted to unscrew the spout to no avail. I have also wrapped the spout with a towel so that it offered some cushion to my hands and better grip, but still the only thing that turns in my face to a nice shade of red.

I am hesitant to use a large channel lock or plumbing wrench to break the spout loose in fear of breaking copper lines or twisting them to a point of being beyond use.

So for those of you who have faced this situation, Just How Darn Much TQ Can I Apply or is needed to remove a stubborn spout?
 

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We have hard water, too. Lots of calcium! I know your strife. I can't tell you what to do, but I break things, then replace. At least that's how it usually ends up. Never a simple fix. :(
 

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You likely have calcium build-up around the threads and need to break them free. Here's some ideas:

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/break-loose-stuck-plumbing-fixture-31603.html

Also, try using a strap wrench to hold tension both forward and backward (tightening and loosening) while tapping around the spout. Wrap it with a thin cloth to avoid marring the finish but not so much as to muffle the strike. If you can get to the back of the water pipe you might block the downspout and pour come CLR in to help break the hold.
 

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This is a Murphey's Law waiting to happen. Those spouts are very thin (china), and if they don't collapse under turning pressure, they might just twist the pipe off at the line. Some repairs are best left to professionals. Or maybe later.
 

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Comes a time when the potential cost of doing it yourself might exceed the cost of hiring a professional to do the job. Keep an objective eye on yourself and try to recognize when you reach that point. We'd all hate to have you add another "spout off" about major repairs, 'cause that just ain't no fun at all.
 

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I would be sending LimeAway or similar into the spout and down the diverter rod to try and break it up. Anything to avoid screwing up the piping inside the wall and having to reconstruct tile or fiberglass shower wainscote.
 

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^^ Available at home improvement stores and hardware emporiums!
 
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Me and plumbing do not get along.

I usually either try and fix it or just hire a plumber to fix what I broke.
 
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GOOD LUCK.

If this fixture was 30 yo. or less then it most likely a diecast pot metal that have been chromed and it is screwed onto a threaded brass nipple that goes between the valve in the wall and the chrome part you see. Hard water, good luck.
 
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Vinegar works and is probably on a shelf in the kitchen.

 

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I've had the same problem, I just kept squirting CLR up the spout and used a large channel lock and beat it with a hammer. It was ruined so I didn't care what it looked like.

Know here is the kicker it screwed on half way down the spout not the end, it comes both ways as well as the screw kind and I needed to go to a plumbing company to find one.

Good luck it sucked and a serious amount of language is needed!

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
 
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I have to replace mine every few years for the same reason. They are the set screw kind. Even after loosening the set screw it's very difficult to get them off thanks to the calcium deposits. Persistence and patience are called for in times like these. Maybe a bit of CLR as well.
 

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Let us know how he removes the darn thing...
 
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I have always used the CLR and strap wrench method to remove tub spouts. It works okay, at best. Some are danged near welded on, it seems.

My one trick, that I learned from a plumber, to make those things easier to remove later, is to wrap teflon tape on the pipe threads before you screw on the tub spout or any other plumbing fixture that may need to replaced down the road. And yes, this has been proven multiple times to work very well.
 
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