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Nice old, short and silent b/w training film from the Army featuring the M18 Recoil-less Rifle aka the "Bazooka". I only fired LAWS while I was in but I did witness the firing of a 90mm recoil-less once,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,one heck of a back blast area! Those things are dangerous in two directions at once.

x101ABNDevil
R.I.P. PT42
 

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Remember the Ontos M-50? it mounted six 103mm recoilless rifles? Light that bugger off and BBQ any thing behind you....

 

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that tank looks like VOLTRON!
 
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I bet that M50 was a beast to reload. I guess you hope you got em with the first six.
 

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Saw a guy blow off the toe of his boot with a 90mm RR at Fort Benning back in 1978. For some reason the back blast was more of a problem for tall guys. You had to be very careful to keep your foot out of that back blast area, if you were over 6 feet tall.
 

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Nice old, short and silent b/w training film from the Army featuring the M18 Recoil-less Rifle aka the "Bazooka". I only fired LAWS while I was in but I did witness the firing of a 90mm recoil-less once,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,one heck of a back blast area! Those things are dangerous in two directions at once.

x101ABNDevil
R.I.P. PT42
Love it! When I was at Ft. Benning decades ago, we were just transitioning from the LAW to the AT4. The later is a much more imposing weapon, with more firepower as well. The cry, "backblast area all clear" will always ring in my ears from those days....
 

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LOL, as a ref during many Reforgers, I remember always standing to the side of Dragon and LAW firers, so I could see how many 2LTs I needed to tag as dead for standing in the back blast area when they yelled fire. Can't remember tagging any NCO's but I sure got a lot of 2LTs.
 

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Why do you think that we see the terrorists firing the RPG from the open, all of the time? Firing any rocket-propelled weapon, with perhaps one exception, in an enclosed space will result in BBQ shooter. Even the average living room isn't big enough to avoid getting toasted.

The Ontos was designed as a tank-buster, capable of being transported in meaningful numbers on planes and landing craft. They mostly operated from ambush in that role. I saw them in Hue during Tet. There, they jumped around the buildings, set up, and fired, then drove out of sight again before an RPG could greet them in return. They reloaded under cover, and did it all again. The men operating them could have them reloaded in less than five minutes after stopping. At the five minute mark, they were back in the vehicle, in gear, and starting to move.
 

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Why do you think that we see the terrorists firing the RPG from the open, all of the time? Firing any rocket-propelled weapon, with perhaps one exception, in an enclosed space will result in BBQ shooter. Even the average living room isn't big enough to avoid getting toasted.

The Ontos was designed as a tank-buster, capable of being transported in meaningful numbers on planes and landing craft. They mostly operated from ambush in that role. I saw them in Hue during Tet. There, they jumped around the buildings, set up, and fired, then drove out of sight again before an RPG could greet them in return. They reloaded under cover, and did it all again. The men operating them could have them reloaded in less than five minutes after stopping. At the five minute mark, they were back in the vehicle, in gear, and starting to move.
Thanks
 

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While in ITR (infan. training regiment) following Marine Corps boot camp in 1968 everyone in my company got to fire one rocket from an actual bazooka. What a blast! (pun intended) Also got to throw one grenade, after throwing numerous dummies, fire the M-60 MG (my favorite), and my least favorite by a long shot, tear gas training. After all these ferocious weapons I was sent to Okinawa to protect our country from ladies of the evening. Dirty job but.....
 

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I got to fire the M60 a LOT. Well, we TRIED to fire the M60 a lot. The danged things weren't exactly paragons of reliability, especially in feeding from a pintle-mount.
 

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My experience with the M60 was they were pretty reliable unless the one you had was about worn out, and most of them in the 60's, 70's and 80's were pretty well worn. When we could get a reconditioned one in, they were great. The Platoon leaders/SGTs would just about fight over the reconditioned ones when they came in. Can't say anything about pindle mounts, as all of ours were M2's.

But my oldest son had a M60 as a backup (to the M2) on his GMV in Afghanistan and he seemed to like it on that pindle mount better than the M240 they had on the back mount.

 

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The Rangers were still humping 90mm recoilless rifles into the early 80's, and I got to fire one in Yakima. That's without a doubt the loudest thing I ever fired. Humping those 90mm rounds around the desert wasn't a lot of fun either. Sure made a mess out of the jeep I shot with it, though. :D
 

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After "playing expert" with the gun over the years, a company of real professionals looked at the weapon, and cleaned up it's spotty areas. Of course, when they presented it to the military, they were informed that the M240 was being phased in, and the M60 out. The M240, a fine weapon, is much heavier than the M60. It's funny how, over the past 50 years, the mantra has been "it's lighter"' for our weaponry. Except, of course, when it might matter.

Not all Branches of the Service are as enamored of the M240 in the infantry role, though, so the new M60 is hanging on.
 
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