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Discussion Starter #1
So who of you that served in the military hasn't uttered those words - with a grenade simulator or CS canister nestled in the bottom of their ruck? I think this has been going on for as long as there have been simulators and smoke/CS grenades. These days with terrorist fears, and bomb sniffing dogs, it's just not a good idea. Not that it was ever a good idea - just sayin'. Marines caught with ten artillery simulators at California mall.
 

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Different strokes for different folks...but me, I've never taken anything off a military range that was illegal.

Guess my dear old Dad taught me about following the rules long before the Army ever got a hold of me. ;)
 

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Different strokes for different folks...but me, I've never taken anything off a military range that was illegal.

Guess my dear old Dad taught me about following the rules long before the Army ever got a hold of me. ;)
Boy that phrase brings back memories! It made me smell the smell of spent ammunition, the feel of hot brass, and the feel of an M16A2 or a SAW in my hands! But I am with MilPro on this. I never took anything either. My Dad was a twenty-three year active duty veteran, and he always drilled into me the need for honor while in uniform. However, I would have loved to have a parachute flare with which to impress my civilian friends! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
The stuff I'm talking about you don't take off a range - it's stuff you use in the field for training. I never took anything off a range either, but I did find the odd simulator and CS grenade in my ruck. Still can't figure out how they got there....:rolleyes:. That's far from the worst thing I ever heard of though. I was on a demo team back in the day, and when we'd go to the training range we'd use what was known as the U.P. principle - Use Plenty. I knew one individual who constantly overestimated what was needed by 1.25 lbs. - the weight of a block of C4 - and one blasting cap. When no one was looking he'd pitch the extras out in the weeds, and he'd make a trip back to the range later to retrieve it. He had fifty or sixty pounds of C4 and thirty or forty blasting caps in a locker off post.

And the really horrendous thing about this guy was - he collected it to sell it. And he'd sell it to people who had absolutely zero experience with explosives. Every time I see a movie where the 'demo' guy just forces a 'blasing cap' into a block of C4 (which is almost always modeling clay) I think the same thing - that's about as far as they'd ever get. It doesn't take much pressure to set off a cap, and C4 is not particularly soft. I've often wondered if any of his 'customers' wound up in little tiny pieces.

As it pertains to these marines, I don't know what they had in mind for the pyrotechics. But an artillery simulator is definitely not a toy. It's got a quarter pound of TNT inside it, and it will definitely screw up your day. Grenade simulators are even more dangerous. They've got the same quarter pound of TNT, but they don't whistle before they go off like an arty simulator does. I'll never forget a training ambush I participated in years ago. The aggressors entered the kill zone, and during the ambush I threw a grenade simulator - which hit a tree to my front and bounced back towards me. I heard it hit the ground close by, but I couldn't really tell where. I figured I was as likely to roll onto it as away from it, so I just laid chilly and waited for it to go off. That was the longest five seconds of my life.
 

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Guess my dear old Dad taught me about following the rules long before the Army ever got a hold of me. ;)
So far, I guess that make 3 votes for 'Army/Dad Training'. :thumb: No surprise they were Marines. :D

The story is rather vague about how this was 'discovered', so I'd imagine there will be some 4th Amendment issues raised.
 

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I remember that phrase! only thing I ever took off a range, and it was an accident, I don't know how it got there, was a live round in the front pocket of my BDUs. I remember being really scared when I found it! Took it to the drill that night, did about 20 pushups and went back to the barracks. ah, good times!
 

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Yes, I took a few "alibi rounds" off range a couple times...

What?!?

There are two types, those who had a stash of alibi rounds and those who had to come to those of us with the alibi rounds.
 

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I’ve made a few trips to Camp Wilson back in the day. During the safety brief the EOD guys would always talk about the stuff you will likely find out on the range. They talked about Marines with unexploded LAW rockets in their possession. I always gave that stuff a wide birth. No tellin if those things would go off.
 

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A thousand years ago, when in the Army Cadets, we were on a trg in Scotland on a private estate. There was a favored trout pool in our area. We borrowed a few "Thunderflashes" and provided the Officers dinner.....no questions were asked.
On the way down to the Falklands during live firing rounds were counted in and out. After a certain point in the voyage, it was: How many rounds can you carry?
 

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The statement, "Making it G.I. proof" has been around decades for a reason...
From both views of EM as well as NCO, I have found that to be an unattainable goal.
 

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Amen Denton! If there's a way around a problem, a service member will find it!
 

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I know a guy that found a practice clay more mine and a smoke grenade in his garage fromhis Marine days. A couple years ago, he was clearing some brush for a bonfire with another marine, and decided to see if they were still good. He said it blew a 2x4 to pieces, and then he popped the smoke. He forgot how much smoke that thing put out, and was waiting for. Police to show up.
 

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in 2008 when i was in al asad, i extended my deployment and got 2 weeks vacation back home for it. when we got to kuwait we had to fly with the army because they aren't going to send 2 marines on the plane by themselves obviously, and we went through customs there. got all the way home, and an army sgt (an actual E-5) ended up having a LIVE grenade he somehow "forgot" he had, they found it in atlanta and sent not only him, but his entire chain of command BACK to kuwait because the order was that if anything was found after you went through customs, you would be put up to the commander in kuwait, so they flew them all back. i cannot imagine a 16 hour plane ride with my whole command THAT mad at me, and we are the only ones on the plane.
 

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"No brass, no ammo, sir!" I can still remember that being shouted out by Pvt. Hidami. We were doing small unit infantry tactics; two guys are supposed to advance on a goal while one covers the other. This was a LIVE FIRE drill... You would hide behind something while the other guy advanced and provide cover fire. Then he would hunker and fire while you would advance. I can still recall the Sgt. explaining the technique. He said, " soldier A advance while soldier B goes BANG BANG". Now Pvt. Hidami was from India and may not have spoken English as well as some. He was also not the sharpest tack in the rack. We were the last two guys and when we completed the course, we stood at present arms in front of the unit LT; bolt open and said, "NO BRASS NO AMMO, SIR". The LT stood in front of you and was supposed to see the dust cover down and bolt open and no rounds in the chamber. He must have been tired and after ensuring I was clear he moved to Pvt. Hidami. He didn't pay much attention as Hidami screamed, "NO BRASS NO AMMO, SIR!". The LT grabbed his M16 and as was usual jerked the muzzle to his eyeball to ensure he saw light and there was a 5.56 55gr round staring at him... HE SCREAMED LIKE A LITTLE GIRL. He had Hidami carted off and I never saw him again. From what I was told, Hidami had been screaming "BANG BANG" instead of presenting cover fire and hadn't fired a round.... made me think of Forrest Gump's seargent... "Forrest, you will make a hell of a soldier!". The draft did bring in a cross section of America (at least those whose daddy's couldn't afford to get them out of service).
 

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Discussion Starter #16
We were doing small unit infantry tactics; two guys are supposed to advance on a goal while one covers the other. This was a LIVE FIRE drill... You would hide behind something while the other guy advanced and provide cover fire.
I remember that drill - "I COVER! YOU MOVE!" I also remember the little ditty they taught us to say during the bounds so as not to be up for more than three seconds - "I'm up, he see's me, he's aiming, I'm down." :D
 

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They put all the smart fellas in infantry training during Nam.... the little jingles made a lot of sense when your brain shut down and adrenelin was pumping.
 
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