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I currently have 3 AR's that have nitrided barrels, all from Palmetto State Armory, an 8 1/2" and 16" in .300 BO and an 18" in .308. I have found no copper (or so little as to be none) in all 3, firing all kinds of brands of ammo. I don't seem to hear anyone else comment on this. I have quite a bit of experience with both chrome plated and unplated barrels in .308, 3006 and .223/5.56 as well as a very high end .223 Kreiger in stainless. All get what i would consider "normal" copper fouling.
I have also heard that like using moly coated bullets, you can hand load a bit hotter due to the lubricity the nitriding gives the bore as well as reports of very long barrel life.
These things along with the corrosion resistance would seem to me to make stainless steel and chrome plated barrels a second or third choice in barrels.
Anyone else have similar non-fouling experiences? Or negatives about nitrided barrels that i don't know about?

OOPS on the "Initrided" title
 

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Corrected the title typo for you.
 

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My Century Vz2008/Vz58 has a 16 inch Green Mountain Nitrided barrel and I've noticed no Copper Fouling in it at all. My Chinese SKS and Egyptian AKM, both with Chrome lined barrels, do get some Copper Fouling.

My next AR build will most likely have a Nitrided Barrel.
 

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Nitrided barrels is done in a liquid molten salt bath that does aid in some lubricity of the surface, but the main point is wear resistance and surface protection. It can increase surface hardness as hard and harder than Chrome at 80Rc. The advantage is that the hardness is put down into the steel rather than on top of it like chrome. Also keeps dimensional changes to the 0.0001" to 0.0003" while increasing material hardness to the depth of .010" to .020".

You can even do it to stainless steel. It's a modern version of case hardening that is more controlled. The have a gas process as well, but hardness penetration is less.

Glock and S&W use the salt bath.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferritic_nitrocarburizing

Maloy
 
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