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Discussion Starter #1
I keep a pistol in a nightstand by the bed. Taurus. Since I have a 10 year-old I use the lock that's built into the gun.
I think this a great system because it only takes about 25 minutes to get he weapon unlocked, even when I'm wide awake and my
arms aren't numb from having been slept on ;). So, I'm thinking of something that I can get into quickly, that's "kid-safe",
big enough for one handgun, handy and inexpensive.

Anything?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I appreciate the responses so far, but a lock box with a key is no better than the set up I have now since it's a key set-up too.
The holsters that hang by the side of the bed are by far the fastest way to go except my daughter's 10 and while I fully trust her to listen to me, she does
have friends over sometimes...
I'm thinking some kind of key-pad set up maybe.
 

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Are you talking revolver or semi auto? A bicycle padlock works well with either style, and the key should be large enough to use quick even in the dark woken up moment.
 

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If you sleep on your back, try the "Tuco" (Eli Wallach) method from "The Good, The Bad and the Ugly". :guns:

Get yourself a gun lanyard, and sleep with it around your neck. :icon_ rasta:
 

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I appreciate the responses so far, but a lock box with a key is no better than the set up I have now since it's a key set-up too.
The holsters that hang by the side of the bed are by far the fastest way to go except my daughter's 10 and while I fully trust her to listen to me, she does
have friends over sometimes...
I'm thinking some kind of key-pad set up maybe.
Thats my problem... the friends...

If I were going that route I would go biometric if it would allow at least 2 people (my wife and me) access.
 
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Gunvault Microvault Biometric is what we use. we got the biometric because it goes off of a fingerprint instead of a keypad code.It works great for my wife and I and keeps the lil ones hands off.Kids are curious by nature and im sure a keycode couldbe broken by a kid in less time than we think. Even the microvault can fit a full size handgun with room for an extra mag as well.Check it out you wont be dissapointed

MVB500 - Microvault | GunVault | GunVault
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Gunvault Microvault Biometric is what we use. we got the biometric because it goes off of a fingerprint instead of a keypad code.It works great for my wife and I and keeps the lil ones hands off.Kids are curious by nature and im sure a keycode couldbe broken by a kid in less time than we think. Even the microvault can fit a full size handgun with room for an extra mag as well.Check it out you wont be dissapointed

MVB500 - Microvault | GunVault | GunVault
Dowby.
Can you still use a keypad code on this in addition to the fingerprint scanner? Don't know why I'd want it, but it looks like it still has a keypad.
 

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I dont believe the keypad can still be used with the fingerprint one.From what I can tell they are the same thing besides the fingerprint scanner.I will have to check the manual when I break it out to take a pic for this thread. What it looks like to me is that its just cost effective for them to use the same platform on the two different products.With mine you have to push the index/triggerfinger button then just slide your digit over the scanner it opens,raise the lid and your ready to go in a flash.It comes with a heavy duty cable you can wrap around something stationary if you want to and keep it in place.It works great,Ive tried to get some friends to try and open it and it just wont happen without tools and some time.The thing is easy to program and holds alot of fingerprints to recognize.All in all I give it a 9.5 out of 10 stars and thats because if you slide your finger over it too fast it doesnt open but a great product for what its designed for.
 
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I hope the biometric gun safes work better than the biometric locks on computers. We have customers locked out of their computers all the time.
 

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I know this isn't PC, but back in the 80's I felt like I and my wife needed a handgun within easy access because we had a rapist terrorizing our neighborhood (he had raped 12 women before they finally arrested him).There weren't any fancy bedside safes and we had a daughter about the same age as yours and a toddler. The toddler is pretty easy to overcome, just move everything high, but the 10 year old girl could have been a problem. I developed the idea of getting them used to the guns, but also Mom and Dad's bedroom was off limits, unless Mom or Dad were with them. I showed my daughter the pistol, let her hold it, ask any questions she had about it, showed her how to operate it and taught her the safety rules. She was very excited about shooting it when I took her out to the range that first time (same day I showed it to her). But for that first shot (all I had was a 9mm Llama 1911 clone), she shot without hearing protection and I was helping her hold the pistol. All shots after that she had on hearing protection, but I think the loudness of that first shot really changed her attitude about messing with that pistol. Then I told her if she ever wanted to shoot, all she had to do was ask me and I would take her out to the range as soon as I could, and when she did I made it a priority to do so. I did this with each of our kids as they reached about the same age and none of my 3 kids ever bothered or even talked about those guns with their friends (we know because one of those friends turned into a crackhead and broke into our house, but never looked for the guns). I gave my daughter a .380 Auto when she turned 18 and went to college. She has been a better shot than any boyfriend that I know of, and she takes great delight in proving to her current boyfriend that she can shoot circles around him and his expensive Commander sized Kimber 1911. She is quite deadly with her little Makarov .380 Auto that I gave her years ago. It was the same with my boys, when ever they wanted to shoot they would tell me and we'd go to the range, even today. When they are home on leave (both are in the Army), we usually go to the range.

Now when I was 8 my Dad sat me in the back of his shop with a .22 short Stevens singleshot where I would practice almost every day after school. I went on stand (community deer drives with dogs) with him that year and sat alone on stand the next year and shot my first deer, a little cow horn buck. So I was introduced to shooting and hunting at an early age. Thinking back he took me squirrel hunting at about 6 (I would spot the squirrels for him) and I remember my excitement when he told me I could go dove hunting with him for the first time, although all I did was chase down shot birds and ring their necks (another non-PC thing for a 7 year old to do). As I got older and could keep up with him, I remember **** hunting and learning to move in the woods at night, listening to the dogs, telling how the hunt was going by the sound of their voices and to get to them fast when the **** went to tree. Shooting and hunting with my Dad are some of my best memories of him.
 

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I know this isn't PC, but back in the 80's I felt like I and my wife needed a handgun within easy access because we had a rapist terrorizing our neighborhood (he had raped 12 women before they finally arrested him).There weren't any fancy bedside safes and we had a daughter about the same age as yours and a toddler. The toddler is pretty easy to overcome, just move everything high, but the 10 year old girl could have been a problem. I developed the idea of getting them used to the guns, but also Mom and Dad's bedroom was off limits, unless Mom or Dad were with them. I showed my daughter the pistol, let her hold it, ask any questions she had about it, showed her how to operate it and taught her the safety rules. She was very excited about shooting it when I took her out to the range that first time (same day I showed it to her). But for that first shot (all I had was a 9mm Llama 1911 clone), she shot without hearing protection and I was helping her hold the pistol. All shots after that she had on hearing protection, but I think the loudness of that first shot really changed her attitude about messing with that pistol. Then I told her if she ever wanted to shoot, all she had to do was ask me and I would take her out to the range as soon as I could, and when she did I made it a priority to do so. I did this with each of our kids as they reached about the same age and none of my 3 kids ever bothered or even talked about those guns with their friends (we know because one of those friends turned into a crackhead and broke into our house, but never looked for the guns). I gave my daughter a .380 Auto when she turned 18 and went to college. She has been a better shot than any boyfriend that I know of, and she takes great delight in proving to her current boyfriend that she can shoot circles around him and his expensive Commander sized Kimber 1911. She is quite deadly with her little Makarov .380 Auto that I gave her years ago. It was the same with my boys, when ever they wanted to shoot they would tell me and we'd go to the range, even today. When they are home on leave (both are in the Army), we usually go to the range.

Now when I was 8 my Dad sat me in the back of his shop with a .22 short Stevens singleshot where I would practice almost every day after school. I went on stand (community deer drives with dogs) with him that year and sat alone on stand the next year and shot my first deer, a little cow horn buck. So I was introduced to shooting and hunting at an early age. Thinking back he took me squirrel hunting at about 6 (I would spot the squirrels for him) and I remember my excitement when he told me I could go dove hunting with him for the first time, although all I did was chase down shot birds and ring their necks (another non-PC thing for a 7 year old to do). As I got older and could keep up with him, I remember **** hunting and learning to move in the woods at night, listening to the dogs, telling how the hunt was going by the sound of their voices and to get to them fast when the **** went to tree. Shooting and hunting with my Dad are some of my best memories of him.
It might not be PC, but I agree completely GreenWolf, nothing beats training and instilling respect for firearms when they are young.

I've been shooting since I was 6 and when I was a kid, I never even thought of touching one of my parents firearms without one of them there!
 

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I was the opposite.I learned hunting shooting and firearms safety at a very young age,However when my dad wasnt around I was at the locking gun cabinet getting into it and fondling them all.My dad did learn about it and tanned my ass but eventually decided that I was old enough to be trusted with all the firearms in the house. I agree with you about starting your kids young and teaching them firearm safety( in fact thats exactly what Im doingin my Avatar pic)but the safes give me an added sense of security that cant be replaced.All of my guns are locked up ,I have all the long guns and some pistolslocked up downstairs and and my edc in a gunvault nanovault and then the home security 9mm in the biometric safe.While I dont think it should be a law to have all of your firearms locked up its common sense to do it with lil ones running around,If more adults were competent on keeping their firearms secure there would be alot less school shootings and other crimes commited by kids.
 

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Heres some pics of it. There is a four inch 24/7 pro 9mm with a tac-light and an extra mag in it with plenty of room to spare.
 

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