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Discussion Starter #1
After being advised by Taurus Customer Service that any SAAMI factory ammo would be OK in the gun, I shot six Remington UMC JSP 180 grain rounds -- and there was noticeable erosion of the cylinder face. Just six rounds. This was one cartridge Taurus looked up for me and said was OK.

I then tried several different factory 240 grain rounds and by the time I got to the sixth round for each brand, the bullet cannelures were all out past the crimp.

I am looking for a lethal round (out of 2.25" barrel) that will not erode the titanium and will not pull apart. Hand loaded is OK.

Anyone found anything?

Maybe this concept only works in 4" barrel?

Ken_C
 

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Titanium is an impressive material. Not knowing anything about the chemical make-up of the powder, the plating or treatment processes the ammunition goes through and the high heat generated when fired, I would have been hesitant to use it in a firearm. During the development of the SR-71 Blackbird, it was found that common cadmium plated hand tools caused reactions with the titanium.
 

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There is a factory coating to fill microscopic holes that slows erosion. You can't use a metal brush and certain solvents on the front of the cylinder.

Maybe it is just a six-bear gun and I am expecting too much shooting at paper.
 

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Yes, I saw those reviews. None of the reviewers looked at the front of their cylinders for erosion or how far forward the bullets were on 4-5-6 after firing 1-2-3.

The bullet movement is discussed in comments somewhere and I knew about it. I had read about erosion in the Taurus titanium 357 magnum, including a warning in the manual, but nothing on the 44 mag.

I even increased the roll crimp on factory rounds in my press. It didn't help. A brass crimp into a cannelure of a 240 gr bullet is just not up to the actual recoil of this gun.

Next time you see a used titanium revolver for sale, say on GunBroker.com, there will not be pic of the front of the cylinder. Request such a pic and odds are you will see serious erosion. At least that was my experience two times in a row.
 

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Welcome to the forum from Northern Oklahoma.
 

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Welcome to taurusarmed.net from an Old Soldier in Olympia, WA; in the Great Pacific Northwest - "Taurus® Spoken Here! Hooaaahhhh!!!!!
 

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I was recently looking out of curiosity, at a S&W 340PD. It's a .357 Magnum revolver, but S&W does warn against using ammo below 120 gr. Supposedly, it's to avoid erosion to the titanium cylinder due to the blast from higher velocity rounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I was recently looking out of curiosity, at a S&W 340PD. It's a .357 Magnum revolver, but S&W does warns against using ammo below 120 gr. Supposedly, it's to avoid erosion to the titanium cylinder due to the blast from higher velocity rounds.
The erosion is caused when the gap is exposed after the bullet passes. If this happens too early, the gases are too hot or too compressed or the wrong composition and you get erosion. It depends on bullet weight, bullet shaft length, how seated, and the type and amount of powder. It seems there is no predicting because Taurus told me all SAAMI 44 mag factory rounds were OK, but they were wrong.

Based on posts I have seen, I believe Taurus will replace any eroded titanium cylinder without charge, even if the gun is no longer under warranty. This suggests to me that the process used to close the porosity might not be 100% reliable.

Mine is still under warranty, I just can't get Taurus on the phone to start a repair, and the web page will not process my S/N.
 

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If the bullets are coming out of the case and you are not using snake shot, then I guess guns have weight requirements. That's the one failure you can't send it back for if it locks up because there's live ammo in it. I would sell it, I don't know how titanium blows up but if it's already wearing away it's only a matter of time. I'm sure mounting some target weights or a scope would eat up some recoil and solve the ammo issue but who wants that nonsense on a UL snubby.
 
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