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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just purchased a new pt111 g2 last week. Got it home and cleaned it really well and oiled the gun. I replaced the guide rod with the stainless from lakeline, loaded both mags and let the gun sit for for a week. Everyday I would pull the slide back several times and dry fire. Just got back from the range and it didn't go well at all. The gun would jam on every other round, failure to go into battery, failure to lock slide back, brass falling on my head. I have read many things online as to what to do and I'm at a loss. The feed ramp is smooth as glass. This happened with both mags. I was using Winchester white box and critical defense ammo. I'm really not wanting to send the gun back. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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For one, don't dry fire this gun. Secondly, did you fire it at all before changing out the guide rod?
 

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I think I would put the factory guide rod and spring, back in the pistol, and try it again. If it still malfunctions, you will have at least eliminated one possibility.
 

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What Taurus1965 said.

Always test a new gun stock. Then you have a known entity.

All the Best,
D. White
 

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Just want to jump in about Winchester White Box.... No No No. It's crap but I'm not sure failure to feed is always an ammo issue. Clean and lube your mags and polish your feed ramp with Flitz.
 

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Agree with Smoke, put factory guide rod back in. Agree with Danpop, run some quality ammo, 124 grain or even 147 grain for a bit. Take magazines apart and clean inside. Please report back how things go.
 

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everybody has opinions==here is mine.
First I never ever change/alter anything on a new gun before running several hundred rounds through it, Simple I figure a new gun (thars been cleaned and properly lubricated) out of the box should run great, if not then likely its not a real well made weapon.
IF the weapon runs well on factory setup then change parts (of course if it runs well then why change parts unless its a personal like thing).
as for bad/ weak, ammo well any weapon can dislike any ammo.
I will only say to those that are down on winny or cheap remmy, well we can meet up and I will bring a few of my CZ and I will give you a quarter for every factory out of the box round that doesn't function and you can give me a nickle for everyone that does.
Now sure there are more expensive ammo out there but it depends on the gun(s) as to what they run on.
I would return the weapon to factory set up, lubricate the weapon a bit wet, take a friend to the range with you and see how the weapon works for both of you,
see sometime sits the shooter as much as the weapon.
hope this helps, all can now start throwing Tomato since I have left the building.----:wall:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Update: Just got back from the gun range and I'm very happy to report the gun ran flawlessly through 100 rounds. I replaced the factory guide rod, used federal and Remington ammo and made sure the gun was well cleaned and oiled. It's hard to pinpoint exactly what the problem was; bad ammo(Winchester white box) or guide rod from lakeline. I'm going to run it with factory guide rod for a while and keep the stainless just in case. I was told by a few people that the lakeline guide rod is superior to the factory so I'm going to hold on to it. Thanks to everyone for the advice!
 

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Glad you got it working. Lesson learned. If it ain't broken leave original parts in gun. I had problems with my G2 related to the Lakeline RCA. I only use original RCA and runs perfect now.
 

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That's all I use at the range is winchester whitebox, 1000's of rounds through my PT809 and PT111G2 with no issues. Glad it was just a guide rod issue, but I'd try the winchester whitebox again just to see how it does with the factory guide rod. Hell I'm about to go pick up some more right now lol.
 

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I also agree that you should have your gun running correctly first, before you start changing things. Since I usually like first range time with a gun to go as well as possible, I also take the guns apart and clean and properly lube them before that first outing. The cleaning and lubrication you did is also likely to be a reason it ran better the second time, but at this point it is impossible to know.
 

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Except the OP stated that he cleaned and lubed the gun prior to his first outing....
No, I read what he said. That doesn't change the fact the internet lore seems to have too many folks convinced to run their pistols too dry. Even though we mention it as the only step to do before installing a recoil assembly, those who have problems typically haven't lubed it.

I don't know what the OP did, but I do hear from folks more of the time than most people on this forum. We've sold tens of thousands of recoil assemblies for the PT111 G2. Typically if there is a problem, even though the gun is "clean and well lubed" according to the customer, all it takes to fix the problem is proper lubrication in the correct places.

It reminds me of how a guy I worked with, when explaining how the load he had tied to the racks of his truck blew off while he was on a freeway bridge, started his story with how he picked up the materials and "properly secured it to his truck."
 

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al I can say is from what I have seen/witnessed and done for people at my local range were I shoot.
a good number of times when I have seen people having function problems with a firearm and usually its their first firearm as well.
I ask if I can help them?
if yes , which it usually is then I find that the gun (especially a semi auto) has a lot of drag and chatter as the slide is racked and lowered.
I usually ask IF I can squirt a bit of CLP on it, the answer again is usually yes, the gun is racked a few times and normally returned to the owner where they have no further problems.
its not at all uncommon for these people to try to pay for my range time, of course I am a member so I shoot for free but the gesture is surely appreciated.
 

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No, I read what he said. That doesn't change the fact the internet lore seems to have too many folks convinced to run their pistols too dry. Even though we mention it as the only step to do before installing a recoil assembly, those who have problems typically haven't lubed it.

I don't know what the OP did, but I do hear from folks more of the time than most people on this forum. We've sold tens of thousands of recoil assemblies for the PT111 G2. Typically if there is a problem, even though the gun is "clean and well lubed" according to the customer, all it takes to fix the problem is proper lubrication in the correct places.

It reminds me of how a guy I worked with, when explaining how the load he had tied to the racks of his truck blew off while he was on a freeway bridge, started his story with how he picked up the materials and "properly secured it to his truck."
Again, in your previous post you stated he should have cleaned and lube the firearm prior to his first outing, and according to him He Did....
Just purchased a new pt111 g2 last week. Got it home and cleaned it really well and oiled the gun. I replaced the guide rod with the stainless from lakeline, loaded both mags and let the gun sit for for a week.
His biggest (and possibly only) mistake was replacing parts on a gun he hadn't even shot yet and by the way overly lubing a gun is just as bad as running them to dry (all depends on the gun)
 
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