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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a new G2C about 3 weeks ago. This is my first 9mm handgun, and I am by no means a knowledgeable gun guy.

The shop sold me 50 rounds of CCI Blazer FMJ 115 gr ammo with the gun. I have shot about half of them. I also got some snap caps and have practiced dry firing a few dozen times, including manually ejecting and advancing the next round. The snap caps are made from casings of four different manufacturers. I had no problems.

Friday I got some Ammo Inc 9mm JHP 124 gr at Rural King. I loaded 10 in the magazine and when I cycled the slide, the slide did not go all the way forward. I removed the magazine and tried to cycle the slide to eject the round, but the slide would only move back and forth about 1/2". Finally the slide went all the way forward, but I still could not clear that round (slide would not go back). So I fired it. Took the gun apart, made sure everything looked OK to my untrained eye, lightly oiled the moving parts, and reassembled it.

Loaded the remaining 9 rounds in the magazine -- exact same result. I ended up having to fire that round. In both cases, I emptied the other rounds from the magazine before firing. In retrospect, I should have left them in to see what happens on subsequent rounds, but I didn't. After all of this, I loaded the seven snap caps into the magazine and cycled them through the gun several times with no issues advancing rounds into the chamber.

Would the most likely cause be the Ammo Inc brand? Or could there be a problem with the gun that needs to be addressed?

Thanks,
Craig
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I disassembled the gun again. With my fingernail I can feel a burr on one edge of the feed ramp (correct term?). I don't think that is likely the cause of the problem, but it should be addressed. Would fine grit emery cloth be the correct tool for this job? Thanks!
 

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After reading some other threads, I learned of the "plunk and twist" test. With the barrel removed from the gun, I dropped various rounds into the barrel and then tried to twist them. The Blazer and all the snap cap rounds all bottomed out completely and twisted with no resistance. The Ammo Inc rounds, on the other hand, were binding in the barrel. It appears they are slightly less tapered at the nose of the bullet. So it is an ammo compatibility issue. Agreed?

I'll see if I can find someone local who might have some similar ammo to trade.
 

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First welcome aboard. Good on you finding and performing the plunk and spin test. You found the problem, it is the ammo inc. ammo. Probably loaded a bit too long for your pistol. Stick with normal factory ammo and you will be fine. I polish my feed ramps with Mother's or flitz and a polishing wheel on my dremel. But really any polishing compound and a microfiber towel will work as well.
 

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I hesitate to make any comment that runs contrary to the post of a friend and long-standing member, but with all due respect, polishing of the feed ramp should (IMHO) be done in a LONGITUDINAL direction, that is, in the same direction as the round would be moving when being chambered or extracted. 600 grit wet-or-dry, wrapped around a round wooden pencil, oiled, and moved forward and back, will remove all those burrs and imperfections that were made by a tool going round and round in the manufacturing of the barrel and ramp. Don't remove too much metal or change the original geometry of the ramp much. Just a judicious polish is all you probably need.There should also be a very small de-burring chamfer on the face of the barrel at the chamber mouth, too. Gentle polish, here, just enough to prevent the loading round from dragging or snagging.

Though dremels will work, they often accentuate the grooved nature of tooling blemishes rather than counteract and remove them.

Now, on to ammo/chamber. The rifling is relieved a bit, beyond the front of the actual "chamber" (called the throat). With 124 gr projectiles, being longer, they may be striking the unrelieved rifling at the "throat" of the chamber. Plunk & twist a round, then look for blemishes to the finish on the bullet to discern this. If it is a throating defect, a good smith could judiciously open the rifling there for you and make it possible for your gun to accept all sized bullets. Obtain a 147 gr round and check it as well for confirmation. that is the maximum sized round loaded commercially.
 
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First welcome aboard. Good on you finding and performing the plunk and spin test. You found the problem, it is the ammo inc. ammo. Probably loaded a bit too long for your pistol. Stick with normal factory ammo and you will be fine. I polish my feed ramps with Mother's or flitz and a polishing wheel on my dremel. But really any polishing compound and a microfiber towel will work as well.
Are you talking polishing the whole ramp, or just where it starts flowing into the chamber? I noticed on mine there are no marks before the mid section of the ramp. Also, and not to hijack the thread, as long as we’re talking polishing on the feed ramp, what about polishing the rest of the barrel? The G2c barrel has a matte finish and I’ve heard of people polishing that surface to reduce drag on the slide. Would that do any actual good?
 

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I have tried HP rounds in several .380 Taurus guns and none of them like it. I've used several different brands of "ball ammo" and those all work very well. From what I can tell, anything that is not smooth and round doesn't like to ride up the feed ramp, leaving me to believe it is too steep. This problem seems to come up over and over on the forum. I have heard guys having luck polishing the ramp, so maybe that is the solution. I haven't tried that myself, as I have no burning need to shoot anything other than regular old "round" rounds.

If you do give it a try, keep us posted and, more importantly, keep future forum searchers informed with what works.
 

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Hand cycling rounds on a new gun may not be the best indicator of a problem....Are you having the same problem when firing? When firing the rounds, the gun cycles much more dynamically than when you slowly hand cycle rounds.
 

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Welcome aboard, from Las Vegas!
Sounds like Ammo Inc. is the problem. Too bad that it caused a burr.
These guys are giving you good advise on smoothing out the burr.

You should be able to shoot JHP with no problems. However, everytime I buy a box of JHP that I haven't tried before, I shoot a few rounds of it at the range just to be sure it cycles ok. Sometimes you'll find a brand that your gun doesn't like.
Good luck!
 

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I appreciate all the comments. I just talked to our son, who recently bought some 9mm hollow point ammo. We plan to swap next time we get together, after confirming his ammo shoots in my G2C and my ammo shoots in his Glock 17.

While I was thinking about this ammo problem, I wondered why some rounds seem to be compatible while the Ammo Inc rounds are not. So I got a couple of rounds for each of the types of ammo I have on hand and measured two of each with a dial caliper. DSC07193b.jpg

From left to right we have CCI Blazer (not sure of grain because it came in a plastic bag), Ammo Inc 124gr, PMC 124gr, and Blazer 147gr.

The diameter of all the rounds at the midpoint were all 0.383" +/- 0.001. No variance there.

There was some variation in length. Blazer (left) was 1.155" long. Ammo Inc 124gr was 1.100". PMC 124gr was 1.153". Blazer 147gr was 1.117".

Interesting things to note: The Ammo Inc round is the shortest of the four; however, its taper seems to be the problem area, causing it to not be fully inserted into the breech. The PMC was marginal on the "plunk and twist" test, even though it is shorter than the Blazer on the left. It appears more bulbous toward the end of the bullet. I will cycle some rounds through the gun to see if the PMC rounds work OK.
 

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As noted in your photo, ammo length does vary greatly. Ran into about the same issue with my G2C. It seems the throat of the chamber is on the shallow end which makes your gun ammo sensitive. If your comfortable, you can use a throat remer to lengthen the chamber. Another option which I chose was to use lapping compound, RemRodz and a dremel to clean up the throat. And what your pistol likes, shoot and what it doesn't put it a side. After about 1000 rounds see if the problem ammo is still an issue.
 

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As noted in your photo, ammo length does vary greatly. Ran into about the same issue with my G2C. It seems the throat of the chamber is on the shallow end which makes your gun ammo sensitive. If your comfortable, you can use a throat remer to lengthen the chamber. Another option which I chose was to use lapping compound, RemRodz and a dremel to clean up the throat. And what your pistol likes, shoot and what it doesn't put it a side. After about 1000 rounds see if the problem ammo is still an issue.
Q D hit the nail on the head.

Buy a box of every different ammo you can find. Run a couple of mags of each. Of those that run find the most accurate. Buy more of the most accurate. After about 500 rounds retest those that don't run. Again of those that NOW run find the most accurate and run another 500 rounds. By the time you have 1000 rounds through your firearm, 90% of what you have should run. Run the most accurate.
 
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I appreciate all the comments. I just talked to our son, who recently bought some 9mm hollow point ammo. We plan to swap next time we get together, after confirming his ammo shoots in my G2C and my ammo shoots in his Glock 17.

While I was thinking about this ammo problem, I wondered why some rounds seem to be compatible while the Ammo Inc rounds are not. So I got a couple of rounds for each of the types of ammo I have on hand and measured two of each with a dial caliper. View attachment 468309

From left to right we have CCI Blazer (not sure of grain because it came in a plastic bag), Ammo Inc 124gr, PMC 124gr, and Blazer 147gr.

The diameter of all the rounds at the midpoint were all 0.383" +/- 0.001. No variance there.

There was some variation in length. Blazer (left) was 1.155" long. Ammo Inc 124gr was 1.100". PMC 124gr was 1.153". Blazer 147gr was 1.117".

Interesting things to note: The Ammo Inc round is the shortest of the four; however, its taper seems to be the problem area, causing it to not be fully inserted into the breech. The PMC was marginal on the "plunk and twist" test, even though it is shorter than the Blazer on the left. It appears more bulbous toward the end of the bullet. I will cycle some rounds through the gun to see if the PMC rounds work OK.

Your photo makes the diameter of the bullet stand out particularly so. The Ammo Inc bullet is a "truncated conical" type, and the major diameter of the bullet (probably .355-.356 ) runs out in a cylindrical fashion, a good thirty or forty thousandths straight out from the case mouth. You will note that the others begin to diminish diameter right from the case mouth. If the Ammo Inc runs into the rifling in the throat area, it would not be surprising, and such is a good indication of the need for the throating to be relieved a bit.

From the photo, it also appears that the diameter of the PMC, above the case mouth, does not begin to taper as radically as does the CCI on the left, in the brass case.

For what it is worth here:
Diagnosis: Throat not fully finished to acommodate longer bullets.
Cure: Mild throat-relief until cartridges with longer bullets seat without interference from rifling in throat area.

The picture says it all. Good job.
 

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Welcome from Northern Illinois! With nothing else to add, I will say that your part of the country is exactly where we are considering relocating to once we escape this state.
 
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cwilly8 - Have you tried the plunk and spin test with a fired casing? Everything I'm reading is still making me lean toward the brass being a problem. Especially the fact that you were having such difficulty ejecting the rounds from the chamber once you got the slide into battery. Maybe the chamber is just a little tight, and the brass a little fat? Anyhow, the plunk and spin with empty brass should answer that question.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
cwilly8 - Have you tried the plunk and spin test with a fired casing?
No, I haven't tried a fired casing, but here's what I did this morning (oh, it's nice to be retired and have time to be a little OCD...). I'm also an amateur photographer, and always looking for opportunities to practice that hobby.

I did the plunk and twist test again on the four types of ammo I have on hand. See photo below.

DSC07195b.jpg

All of the ammo except the problem child (Ammo Inc on the right) bottomed out when dropped into the barrel. The Ammo Inc protruded about 1/32" to 1/16" (by eyeball) more than the others. The brass casing obviously did not bottom out. I then twisted each round several times. You can see that all of the ammo was rubbing on the throat of the barrel (the tapered part of the rifling), as evidenced by the horizontal marks . (A close-up of the barrel is shown below.) To get the Ammo Inc rounds to twist, I had to apply very slight lifting force while twisting. It looks like it is binding at the chamfered edge of the bullet.
DSC07197b.jpg

Here is a cropped version of the barrel photo. Does this look normal? The taper on the rifling looks a little rough. Is this something that a gunsmith with the correct tool could fix? Is it worth fixing? Thanks again for all the great suggestions!
DSC07197c.jpg
 

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Great test! Very telling. Yes, a gunsmith could fix it, but I would send it back to Taurus. I would be concerned that there could be other parts of the barrel out of spec. Might take a couple weeks, but they will make it right.
 
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