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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All!

I posted this issue on TFL, but thought here might be better.

I just purchased a new 627 Tracker -- it's my first firearm of my own since I moved out. It's also the first I've fired since I was a teenager -- what a thrill! I don't think I could have handled the .357 mag when I was younger (did shoot some .38 then).

Anyway, after about 50 rounds of .38 special +Ps hollow points (but not fully jacketed -- does that make it a SJHP?), the cylinder locked up. I could free it by just wiggling it side-to-side, so I thought maybe it was just gumming up. So I did a quick cleaning -- one run with the brush and scrubbed off the front of the cylinder and the back of the breach. This seemed to fix the problem.

Then, another 30 rounds later, it happened again. Once again, just wiping off the cylinder made it work okay again. Once I got it home and cleaned it thoroughly, I dry-fired it a bunch (with snap-caps), and it was flawless.

Is this something I need to worry about? I'm assuming that this is just accumulation of unburned powder and lead, and perhaps my cylinder-gap is on the tight side -- does that sound right? If it's tight, I know that's actually somewhat desirable for performance. I intend it as a camp-gun and home defense gun, I won't be needing 50 rounds when necessary ;).

Are there any other options that I should be considering here?

-Jephthai-
 

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Switch ammo. Sounds like the stuff you're using is leading or gumming up the forcing cone gap/barrel-cylinder gap. You can check cylinder gap with a simple feeler gauge. It should measure from .004-.007" or so. Anything tighter than .004" would be a little too tight. Sounds like your ammo may be the cause, though.
 

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Have you looked at the gap before and after it locks up? You should be able to see a little gap between the cylinder and the barrel. Just hold it up to the light for a quick check.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
NativeTexan said:
Switch ammo. Sounds like the stuff you're using is leading or gumming up the forcing cone gap/barrel-cylinder gap. You can check cylinder gap with a simple feeler gauge.
Thanks for the confirmation -- I was thinking maybe something fully jacketed would be better. I want to get a gauge to check it. If it's too tight, do I take it to a gunsmith, send it to Taurus, or just clean it more often?

I'll try to pick up a greater variety next time. This last time it was Winchester UMC (I think) for the .38 special and Federal Premium Hydra-Shoks for the .357.

LikesToShoot said:
Have you looked at the gap before and after it locks up? You should be able to see a little gap between the cylinder and the barrel.
I checked it at home, but not at the range (so not at lockup). I can definitely see the gap with a light behind it. My next chance to shoot will be in a couple weeks. I'll try to pay more attention. It should be outdoors, so I imagine it will be easier to eye the gap.

Everything is still quite functional. I'm just hoping it's not something too exotic. It looks like cylinder gap is a common issue, as well as accumulation at the cone/cylinder. Normal is better :).

-Jephthai-
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
NativeTexan said:
You can check cylinder gap with a simple feeler gauge. It should measure from .004-.007" or so. Anything tighter than .004" would be a little too tight.
Okay, so I measured it last night, and the gap is just about .004" (just a tad on the .003" side). So that gives me some additional confidence. Thanks for the suggestion.

I also tried another test that other people have suggested. I slipped in some paper that measures out at about 0.004" and the cylinder locks up, just like it did on the range. So I think I'm safe assuming that the gap just filled up with crud. I will be trying to get it out to another range maybe this weekend, so I'll watch it more carefully.

Thanks for the responses!

-Jephthai-
 

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look at the ejector rod try to close your cylinder see if it backed out a bit.
could be left hand thread ,tighten and try cylinder. my rb just di the same thing plus i had a colt that di it. also,the jacketed is not a bad way top go with a new gun,after 100 -200 rounds try lead,that's what i use most of the time. dan
 

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The next time it acts up try pulling back on the cylinder release (#17 thumb piece, http://www.taurususa.com/pdf/manual_revolver.pdf) page 19. Then see if the hammer, trigger can be moved. If so, the center pin may be in a bind due to heat, expansion, or dirt.
I had a cylinder lock up on mine that was caused by the center pin, #3, getting stuck in the cylinder and NOT unlocking the gun to allow it to be fired.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
LikesToShoot said:
The next time it acts up try pulling back on the cylinder release (#17 thumb piece, http://www.taurususa.com/pdf/manual_revolver.pdf) page 19. Then see if the hammer, trigger can be moved. If so, the center pin may be in a bind due to heat, expansion, or dirt.
I had a cylinder lock up on mine that was caused by the center pin, #3, getting stuck in the cylinder and NOT unlocking the gun to allow it to be fired.
I will check that next time I take it out -- thanks for the input!

Last time I was at the range, when it got the lockup point (which was over 100 rounds in, this time), I held it up to the sky and looked at the cylinder gap. It was definitely harder to see through it than when it's clean. So I cleaned off the forcing cone and the front of the cylinder, and it then worked fine to the end of my practice session.

-Jephthai-
 
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