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Discussion Starter #1
My taurus model 441 in .44 special has a wonderful double action trigger pull, but the lite spring tension is causing some mis-fires as some primers aren't getting enough indentation to ignite the powder charge.

I could try changing my brand of primers, which are presently Winchester...but I really feel that the hammer spring needs to hit harder.

Also contacted Wolff Springs.com but an email said they only make hammer springs to reduce spring tension...what's up with that???

Can anyone give me a link on stronger tension hammer spring for my gun.

Taurus won't sell me a hammer spring and I won't send them the gun to replace one.


TB C45
 

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I know Federal primers are pretty soft, I'd give 'em a try first and see if light strikes continue.

If that won't work I guess you can place a washer or something similar under the recoil spring as a last resort. I'm not aware of anyone selling heavy springs for Tauus revolvers...

BTW: How often do you get misfires? Reloads? Any chance primers are seated a little high? I know my PT1911 will misfire if the primer isn't seated all the way :0 You can check by holding up 2 rounds to the light with headstamps touching. If you can see light in between coming thru you know primers aren't seated all the way. Just last week I had to re-do some cases I primed before, and they looked OK and didn't really feel hight to touch...
 

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I agree with Gray I would think a seating problem. Do you use a hand primer tool or the press? Unless the firing pin got damaged .
 

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Clip one coil from the firing pin return spring. That should do ya' right. Some Tauri revolvers appear to have one too many coils in the firing pin return spring. It won't do no harm cuttin' a coil off as all it functions for is to return the firing pin back in the firing pin chamber after each trigger pull. I did that on my 627 6" barreled Ti-Tracker and it sovled all my light primer strike issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys, but I needed more hammer force to indent the primers to make an ignition.

Took the side plate off, removed the guide rod stem and spring, put a tiny washer on the stem shaft, reassemble the guide rod in the proper bottom bell shaped bushing with its hole.

Loaded up a dozen brass cases with CCI rifle primers (without powder & bullets) that are very hard to indent, then test fired last night in my garage. All brass fired OK, it seems the problem is resolved...I hope the washer can hold up under the repeated usage.

I also had to fire those test rounds one at a time in my cylinder, the lack of recoil kept pushing the primers back out of their case heads and binding the gun up against the flash-plate to the point the cylinder wouldn't rotate.

Problem solved...I hope, will be going to the gun range today to test some live rounds.

TB C45


Picture before washer was put on.

 

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Thanks guys, but I needed more hammer force to indent the primers to make an ignition.
If a primer is high it may not fire; first sprike (misfire) will seat the primer to where it should be, second strike will ignite it....

I also had to fire those test rounds one at a time in my cylinder, the lack of recoil kept pushing the primers back out of their case heads and binding the gun up against the flash-plate to the point the cylinder wouldn't rotate.
Do you mean primers came out a little after you fired them? :???: Hmm... I never tried that with a revolver, but I thought because there is no bullet, the gasses would freely escape down the barrel and the primer would stay in place.

I have to ask; are you sure the primers weren't high to begin with? Did you try my test?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
First of all, my primers are not seated too high, nor is there a problem in seating the primers in the method I use to seat them.

The problem is in the weak hammer spring not making enough of an indentation on the primers.

The primers popped back out enough to bind up the cylinder from rotating with the test brass that had no powder or bullets in them. With normal loaded cartridges my primers do not back out...ever.

I'm using this method to test the primer indentation on the hammer strike marks for good primer ignition.

The physics involved in a normal loaded cartridge with powder and bullet being fired is the severe recoil shoves the brass against the flash-plate keeping the primers seated in the brass so the gun will operate normally in its cylinder rotation.

If no powder or bullet is involved, the primers tend to back out enough to bind the cylinder rotation. Try it and see for yourself, at least that's what happen to my .44 spl. and .45 Colt revolvers.

TB C45
 

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Oh well.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Went to the shooting range today around noon time.

Shot off assortment of loads about 60 cartridges...all fired OK without any mis-fires, and these were the ones with Winchester primers.

So, hammer spring is doing just fine with its little washer added to its guide rod stem...hope it last for me. It really is putting a dent in the primers now.

TB C45
 
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