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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to buy a taurus from my local gun shop. I'm looking at the 627 tracker and the 66 in stainless. He doesn't have either one in stock, but he has the best price. There isn't a single dealer in my area that has both of them in stock so that I can compare the two side by side. The tracker by far seems to be most popular right now, but, I don't think I could stand that grip for very long. Does anyone out there have both that can share their opinions with me to help me decide. The 627 is 420.00 and the 66 is 390.00.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
revolvers, colt king cobra, smith 686,m85 taurus stainless,m85 titanium, in 22 caliber,smith617,colt trooper mark 3 and new frontier, ruger single six. i'm leaning toward the 66. i had a 669 years ago and traded it off. the 627 has a "compact" frame. i'd like to know what the difference is between that one and the medium frame on the 66. it just about has to be in the grip.
 

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You do not specify what use or what needs you have to fill for a pick. Is this to be used for hunting, defense, or competition of some kind?

If for defense, the model 66 would be the better bet in most instances. If for mainly hunting the 627 would be the way to go.

While the 627 has ports that will counter the recoil somewhat the ports do have drawbacks. Hot blowtroch gasses coming out the front of the barrel can cause loss of vision at night or under low light conditions, even with the introduction of flash retardent powders currently out in most .357 magnum ammo.

Then there is the extreme noise that will be blown back directly at you that can be disoreinting in enclosed spaces. Shock waves of high magnitude will definetely cause hearing pain and loss when it is needed most in a defense scenario.

The extra flash coming out the ports will pinpoint you to return fire as well as sillhoutte you completely for the attacker to see. The standard model 66 has no drawbacks in this area.

How much .357 magnum ammo are you really going to fire off or really need? Is the need for the .357 magnum really there as much as you think it is?

These are all things to consider before you buy. There are others as well. Handgrips for either model can be changed out for fit and comfort. Even the factory may have options for this.

Many people shoot .38 Specials through there .357mags for practice as well as defense. We have quite a few here that do just that. Makes for better or track record for concluding fights.. 357 magnums carry more horsepower than 38s, but at a stiff penalty in flash and noise. I am not saying you can't handle magnums. Just consequences that have to be considered.

There are pros and cons for their use. If for hunting, then the 627 gets the nod. It will take a steadier diet of high pressure magnum rounds.

The Taurus model 66 is similar to the same model as the S&W version in K frame. Both were designed for a light weight, easy to shoot ,and for easy carry all day over the large N framed Smiths or larger Colt revolvers. Both were designed to be shot some and carried a lot. A steady diet of magnum ammo does batter and cause them to wear out sooner than the N frames or Smith & Wesson's L framed 686. Ruger GP100s and the 686 S&W family can take an almost unlimited diet of magnum rounds.

The high pressure 125 gr. JHP magnum loads are the reason the heavier framed revolvers were developed. Cylinder end shake, looseness, and excellerated parts wear and battering are the reasons the heavier framed revolvers were developed.

A medium to light use of magnum rounds can be shot through the model 66s of both companies without any trouble. Major use of magnum loads cause all the troubles mentioned above.

Heavier bullet weights usually won't cause as much wear or tear on the model 66s. There are exceptions to this.

One other thing. Which revolver fits your grip and needs best? Which trigger pull is better? And can you reach the trigger with the first joint of your trigger finger while gripping the gun? This is how you will do most of your double action shooting. Not with the pad of the first joint on the finger. That is for single action shooting.

So there is a lot to consider before plunking down that cold hard earned cash.

I have two older Taurus center fire revolvers. One is a model 66 with 4 inch barrel and the other is a 65 with 2.5 inch barrel in nickel. Both are going strong still and have given excellent service.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I won't be hunting with it. Mainly just informal target shooting. I'm a reloader and I don't shoot factory ammo unless I'm out of brass. I load a medium velocity load. best way do describe it is between a 38 sp +p and a factory 357round. I guess if money wasn't an concern I'd go with a ruger. those things are a little ugly, but they are by far the strongest in my opinion. But, these days money is a concern all the time. why do you think the tracker would be the best choice for shooting magnum loads from a reliability standpoint? The tracker is 10oz lighter than the 66 and that metal has to come from somewhere. My first guess, and i do mean guess, is that the 66 would stand up better.
 

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I don't have a tracker, though I've had the hots for a titanium one for a while. The price is the problem with unobtainium for a poor guy. But, I've got absolutely no complaints about my two M66s, a 4" nickel and a 3" older model lockwork blued one. The new ones are perhaps the best .357s Taurus builds IMHO. They're proven, reliable, well fitted, and IMHO every bit the quality of any other medium frame .357 out there and since Smith and Wesson no longer makes a K frame, if you want a new K frame, you have few other choices. :D I owned a M19 and my two Taurus 66s out shoot that gun at least with .38 special. Both are accurate with .357 loads and both are high quality guns.

Personally, I like K frame sized guns. The Taurus is improved in design, too, over the old M19 I had. I prefer the floating firing pin/transfer bar action and there is no flat spot on the bottom of the forcing cone of the Taurus, a weak point that tends to crack over time with a lot of hot loads in the M19.

Again, I've never owned a Tracker and I'm sure it's a great gun from all the comments I've heard of 'em. But, it's hard to improve on perfection, JMHO. My 3" 66 is a dandy for IWB carry. The 4" is the revolver I'll carry backpacking, camping, hiking, or for general outdoor use. I don't actually HUNT with it, but it's a general use carry for the outdoors, a bit lighter than my Blackhawks and on a long hike ounces count.
 

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BTW, I owned a Security Six in stainless at one time. Nice gun, strongly built, K frame weight, but the thing had terrible muzzle climb with hot loads, hurt the hand. It was no lighter than my M19 I had at the time, but the 19 was much more a pleasure to shoot, much as with the Taurus 66s. It wasn't terribly accurate with .38s either an dI shoot a lot of .38 brass, cheaper to get than .357 brass and helps me pick my light loads out of my heavy. There's one at a pawn shop near me now. It's pristine, nice gun, but they want $400 for it. That gun hasn't been built in 20 years! Some folks think the Security Six is the best revolver ever built, but it had its flaws, too. The GP100 addresses some of those flaws and beefs up the basic design, but at the price of weight. The things are awfully heavy to have to tote all day. To me, K frame guns are the best compromise in weight vs strength. No, you probably shouldn't put 200 rounds a day of 125 grain full house .357 through it, but from what I've seen, the gun will outlast the owner in normal use. The guns are stronger than most detractors would have you believe. The ones that got the bad rap were used heavily in police service. Those guns, used for training and such, probably fired more rounds in a week that I feed mine in 10 years. With a 100 percent diet of hot loads, stands to reason they'd get loose in five or 10 years.

I've stopped worrying about the strength of medium weight .357 revolvers like the M66. To me, it's a non-issue, but I'd rather tote my .45 Colt Blackhawk around all day than a GP100, the thing isn't any heavier! There are lighter Smith and Wesson L frames out now, designed for carry. That's an option if you don't like the K frames, but the M66 is a great gun and I found mine for a lot more attractive pricing. My 4" is like new, slick, accurate, tight, not more than 10 or 12 years old, and I bought it used for $197. I think I'd have to be on crack to pay $400 for a 20 year old Ruger Security Six, considering.
 
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