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My Gun Doesn't Shoot Where I Point It!

There are basically three options that can be exercised to fix the problem...


1. Adjust the Sights

  • Granted that everything below is correct, there are just simply times when the easiest solution is to adjust the sights to the shooter. On an adjustable sight gun, this can be as simple as turning a couple of screws.
  • However, for some sights this means major work in modifying to replacing one or both sights.
  • For many shooters of the Heinie sights on the Taurus pistols, this means that the rear sight is adjusted for windage and the front sight is replaced for a shorter height. (Shortening the front sight raises the point of impact)
  • There are many experienced shooters who will see this alternative as a crutch for an inexperienced shooter, but for others it is a fast and convenient way to get a gun to respond to their grip, style, etc.

2. Adjust the Ammo

  • Hitting that far off even left or right can happen with any handgun, or high and even low for that matter. In 9mm the 115 gr. loads can hit that low depending on the ammo type.124 gr. bullets hit slightly higher and the 147 gr. bullets just a bit higher than that. Has to do with the physics of where the gun is when the bullet leaves the barrel.
  • Timing as to where the bullet leaves the barrel as the gun recoils, powder burn length of time, length of barrel, type of action, and other key factors. Even +P can drasticlly alter POI.
  • Gun makers try to zero a certain firearm with proof rounds. Taurus and other makers do not alway tell the public what or what weight the rounds used were. Even alike pistols of the same model can shoot to different point of impact. Happens for all the companies that put out firearms. Just one of the mechanical and physical vageries of life.

3. Adjust the Shooter

  • Different shooting styles, ways the gun is held and gripped, and type of ammo are all causes of point of impact factors.
  • Different ways of gripping the gun sometimes cause this. I practice strong hand,weak hand, and holding with both.ONe could be injured and have to use either hand alone. This grip difference can cause this if I am not careful. This is just for example.
  • Experimenting with various bullet weights and ammo brands is one way to solve this. These all have different impact points. Even if you use the same brand of ammo everytime, even different batches and lots can have varying dicrepancies as to where the bullets will hit. Find one that works and buy as much of that batch as practically possible. Lot numbers are printed on the flaps or sides of cartons.
  • Fixed sight users, whether SA revolvers, any action type of pistol, or DA revolver, have to find the load pr loads that hit as close as possible and live with what they have. One can remember where that load hits on a paper target and then one has to make the slight correction, up,left,down or right, just a slight bit, to make it sure the bullet hits dead center.
  • If shooting for center of mass, which is what one does for most scenarios, lifting the front sight just a fraction of an inch or so will raise the impact point to where you want it. Beats expensive alternatives.
  • One can use the Heinie sights as regular sights and ignore the dots completely. Just use a standard sight picture. Make sure enough light is on both sides of the front sight and the front sight shows up equally squared with the back sight.


This FAQ was the product of the group effort of all the moderators of Taurus Armed.
 

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Another reference for Marksmanship development:



Before adjusting sights, use this guide.
 

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If it is a revolver and it only happens with certain cylinders bores check the timing.
 

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That's one of the best charts around.

Yes, except.... the term "jerking or Slapping" the trigger isn't what it sounds like. With a pistol (especially a small one) jerking the trigger can be simply moving the finger slightly too quickly. Or failing to pause near the end of the trigger stroke BEFORE the sear releases. 99% or so of the "low left" problems are caused by the person holding the gun. Easy way to "prove" it to people with poor trigger technique is to insert a chambered bore sight laser.
 

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I use to have that problem also. I found when I took about 1/2 of a step closer I could hit where I pointed my gun..:).. This is my Pistol and this Is my Gun..This is for Shooting and this is for Fun..:)
 

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After I buy my shotgun to round out my collection, I'm going to get private lessons.

Through trial and error I've learned where to hold randomly with my 40 and 45.....I'm not experienced in the least when it comes to some other people you might talk to on here or watch their vid's on Youtube....next time your at the range try aiming to the left/right/bottom of where it is your intending to shoot and see where it goes.

This could be bad advice, but if your looking for fun watching what you shoot go where you want it(not actual professional advice), try holding the front sight off to the side of where you want it go .

I'm getting used to the snappiness of the 40 now so I'm getting better with that, now my challenge is transitioning between the calibers and getting it "close" to where I want to go
 

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My humble suggestions for this thread.

1. Adjust the Shooter
2. Adjust the Shooter
3. Adjust the Shooter





I bought a used Tangfoglio handgun online, and was excited until I opened the box and discovered the rear sight was cranked all the way over to the right side.

**cue emotional sad music***

Ever since that day, ive dedicated myself to the part time mission of making sure the tragedy of nice handguns with bubba'd sights never happens to someone else. It could be your kids who shoot high right because the handgun they bought was owned by a numbskull with bad trigger skills and a sight tool.

Remember that a handgun is a two-part shooting system. One part is the weapon, the other is YOU. Guess which part is the fleshy one that moves during the shot?Were we inaccurate primates taken out of the equation even the lowliest HiPoint could shoot 2" groups. Its the human element which causes one's groups to look poor, and that's the part that needs work.

My suggestions are simple. First, ensure the weapon fits your hand. All the charm of John M. Browning's(may allah smile upon the prophet) finest work cant help you if your hands don't agree with the frame of the gun. Second, run 250 rounds through the weapon.

If your shots are clustering in some odd pattern like almost off the paper on the top at 7 yards, there's room for concern. If the shots are low and left, buy another 250 round brick and call over a pro with experience.

Whatever you do, do nOt TouCh THe siGHTs!
 

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Another fantastic article by Cimarron. :cool:


Sure wish I could have known this gentleman.
 
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Another reference for Marksmanship development:



Before adjusting sights, use this guide.

Thank you so much for posting this. Out of the four guns I shoot one of them I shoot low-left. I will pay attention to see if I am doing any of these things while using this gun. Have no idea why I don't do it with the other guns.
 

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I "point" shotguns and "aim" everything else...:icon_ rasta:

...and...take the blame for my "misses"...:thumb:
 

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Man the longer I read the more I learn. I try to learn something new everyday. I don`t have anything else to do in bad weather. Come on spring. :)
 

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Gentlemen, all of the above posts are the reasons I love this board.

I've been shooting a long time, not often enough to be good but often enough to be competent. I'm much better with a shotgun than I am with a rifle and that's better than I am with a pistol. As another poster said, he only has a problem with one gun and that's the same with me, my 24/7. I could compensate for hitting low left by aiming high right but that's not the object of the exercise which is to hit where you aim. Although this is my only problem "piece" I think that the main problem is still the operator. Perhaps I am trying to strangle the gun when I shoot and just don't realize it. You've given me a lot to think about and experiment with next time I go to the range. Thank you all.
 

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As another poster said, he only has a problem with one gun and that's the same with me, my 24/7. I could compensate for hitting low left by aiming high right but that's not the object of the exercise which is to hit where you aim. Although this is my only problem "piece" I think that the main problem is still the operator. Perhaps I am trying to strangle the gun when I shoot and just don't realize it. You've given me a lot to think about and experiment with next time I go to the range. Thank you all.
The ergonomics of each handgun design will be different and exactly how you pull the trigger can be the most important factor. It can take time and practice.
 

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I concur with the previous poster who said before you mess with the sights, you should check the shooter. It's cheaper, quicker, easier, less time consuming, and, in my experience, it's normally human error anyhow.

Find someone that you know can shoot at least fairly well. They don't have to be a one ragged hole at a measured mile shooter, just someone who can put together a decent sized, consistent group- and consistent is the key. Have them put 10 or 20 rounds (the same ammo that you have been shooting helps here- different ammo can have a different point of impact) through the gun and look at where the groups are hitting.

If they are hitting in the same place as where you were hitting, I'd start to suspect the gun is the problem. If they are roughly at the point of aim (take into account that your guest shooter is most likely firing an unfamiliar gun here), then I suspect it's the loose nut behind the trigger's (the shooter) fault, not the gun's.
 

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The ergonomics of each handgun design will be different and exactly how you pull the trigger can be the most important factor. It can take time and practice.
Yea, you're right. I'm actually a half decent revolver shot and I've always shot my little AMT Back-Up .380 fairly well at short distances. The 24/7 has always shot low and left. It groups very well, really well in fact, just low and left. After reading some of the advice on this board I do believe that I may be choking the life out of it as I squeeze the trigger. We'll see here in a little while when the weather gets better and I go burn up some ammo dialing in the new Williams Fire Sights. Actually, after spending the winter swapping scopes and sights on a number of firearms I should have a full day at the range. It'll be FUN.
 
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