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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a Taurus Model 96 on GB recently. It is a beautiful weapon. Great finish, smooth action and great trigger. It does have some endshake so that after only a few rounds the cylinder binds up. This has to do with clearance between the forcing cone and cylinder. The slightest pressure on the cylinder will allow the weapon to cycle fine. I haven't been able to find noseshake shims from any of the suppliers.(Midway or Numrich) I don't really want to file the cone. Has anyone else had this problem? Any suggestions? I really want to make this revolver fully functional. Help!!
 

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I bought a Taurus Model 96 on GB recently. It is a beautiful weapon. Great finish, smooth action and great trigger. It does have some endshake so that after only a few rounds the cylinder binds up. This has to do with clearance between the forcing cone and cylinder. The slightest pressure on the cylinder will allow the weapon to cycle fine. I haven't been able to find noseshake shims from any of the suppliers.(Midway or Numrich) I don't really want to file the cone. Has anyone else had this problem? Any suggestions? I really want to make this revolver fully functional. Help!!
Congrats on your purchase metalbanger1.

Try these folks for shims.
https://www.triggershims.com/taurus.html#ST2
They do not list the 96, but that doesn't mean they don't have them. I've purchased from them before, recommended vendor.

Enjoy your 96.
 

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Shims may not help you. When you add shims, it forces the cylinder to the rear, so you end up with whatever gap exists when you now hold the cylinder fully rearward. If it's so far forward it's striking the forcing cone, you'll likely end up with an excessive gap. Try holding your cylinder fully to the rear and checking the gap with a feeler gauge.

The "proper fix" for end-shake is to stretch the yoke, which requires a special tool and a bit of expertise. This will tend to widen the gap also. Once the end-shake is fixed then the gap has to be addressed. The only way to fix the gap is to remove the barrel, turn the shoulder down, re-install the barrel, cut the breech end of the barrel to re-set the gap and then re-cut the forcing cone.

See if Taurus will fix it for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Taurus said that the life time warranty was for the life of the weapon. (Meaning until they stopped supporting it)
They didn't know if they had any parts to repair it. If I sent the weapon in and they didn't have parts, they would send it back. I would be out shipping. Plus my time etc.
So it wasn't encouraging. Thanks for the reply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When I hold the cylinder fully to the rear the gap is approximately .007. If I add .004 to the front of the cylinder that should make the gap around .003 which would be functional I think. Does that make sense to you? I don't have access to the tool you talked about nor do I have expertise to use it.
I'm not a gunsmith, only a gun mechanic.
 

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When I hold the cylinder fully to the rear the gap is approximately .007. If I add .004 to the front of the cylinder that should make the gap around .003 which would be functional I think. Does that make sense to you? I don't have access to the tool you talked about nor do I have expertise to use it.
I'm not a gunsmith, only a gun mechanic.
That's not too bad. .007" is probably "within spec" and shouldn't cause a problem. It's on the edge of what I would accept. My advice is to go ahead and shim it out as much as possible. End shake can cause other problems. It can beat up your ratchet, hand, etc. I'd rather have no end shake and .007 gap than .004 end shake with a .003 gap at rest.

When you fire a revolver with end shake, the cylinder is forced to the rear at firing. So you're going to, in effect, have a .007 gap anyway. If it's not a problem now, it shouldn't be when fully shimmed.

If it doesn't work out, Taurus should replace that with a "comparable" weapon under their warranty if they can't fix it. I'd insist on a new Model 66 due to the adjustable sights.

If I could find shims I'd go that way. If I didn't care about the cost I'd have a gunsmith check it out. But repairs would likely cost you as much or more than the gun. This is why I don't buy revolvers sight unseen. Especially older ones.

Last time I had a yoke stretched and a barrel set back I think it was $200+.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the advice. I will try to shim it fully as you have suggested. I didn't know what was acceptable with respect to cylinder gap. When I finally reached someone at Taurus Cust Service they indicated they would offer a replacement if they were unable to repair the weapon. Taurus doesn't have a comparable .22lr revolver that I have seen. I have had good luck with GB buying semi s but revolvers are a different machine. I emailed the guy suggested in a post above that sell shims. He isn't really up on the old Taurus, but indicated he would be willing to make some with info on correct dimensions. From a mechanical standpoint why wouldn't it work to shim the front of the cylinder on the crane? Would that accomplish the same thing?
 

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I thought this was a .38, but now I realize it's the .22...my bad. Being a .22 the situation is a bit different, the end shake isn't quite as serious as in a centerfire regarding the effects of recoil. I'd still shim it out.

I guess shimming at the front might work, but nobody does it that way. On most revolvers it would require a very narrow shim, and would expose the shim to the blast from the cylinder gap. I don't think that would work out, which is probably why they don't do it that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I was able to get the shims I needed from Lance at Triggershims.com. Seems like a great guy. Spent lots of time and explained things and even sent pic via email to show me what to do. If you need any shims for endshake, trigger, or hammer. Check this guy out Triggershims.com. I haven't receives the shims yet, so I will post an update after installing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I received the shims and installed them. It resolved the problem. This weapon is now one of the best revolvers that I've ever owned. Very smooth action, great trigger and accurate. Thanks for the advice of the forum.
 
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