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From what I've read all the small frame rimfire revolvers have heavy triggers. I know that mine sure does. After many, many rounds downrange (I'm guessing I'm over 300) the trigger gets better. Not so much lighter but smoother, which makes it easer to use.

Steelheart
 

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I think Steelheart hit the nail on the head.
There are issues of reliability if springs are changed in a rimfire. More so than if it were a centerfire. Not saying that it cannot be done. There is a precedent that there is a very fine line between improved,lighter trigger pull and reliable function for rimfires.

Rimfire gun springs are smaller and have less energy than the larger ones. In other words the parameters are very small for any changes made.

Stoning and other polishing processes could cause problems if it can be done at all.

Took the 94 and put snapcaps for the .22lrf into the chambers. Then over a period of time, days or weeks, 500-1000 repetitions dryfiring smoothed and lightened things somewhat.

Even S&W .22lrf revolvers that have been reviewed in the gun, police,tactical, and other magazines and periodicals, have shown that these have stiif pulls similar to the Taurus.

Much older Smith & Wessons such as the model 17 had lighter were reputed to have sweet light trigger pulls. Since that has been decades ago, none of the present day gun makers have been able to repeat this. Not even S&W.

Special attention to detail that only humans can do was part of th reason for the the model 17 and other S&W rimfire revolver's excellent and light pull through. Labor costs,extra machining, extra persoanl training of workers, and Union labor forces create an expense no maker will tolerate to stay competitive in the hotly contested firearms market.
 

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One last thing.

If there are people out there who have replaced the rimfire springs and it has worked out for them and long term relaibility hasn't been compromised, then bully for them.

The other side of the coin is that this is a case by case basis for each revolver and is not something that will be true necessarily for mass consumption. Even similar or exact models very well not take to the spring changes.

This all has been very well documented down through the decades by gunsmiths in articles in books and magazines.

Trips back to the factory to undo what others have done is what you folks do not want for the most part anyway.

If a accreditied gunsmith has actually done these action jobs and spring changes and had major success, then and only then take the steps to make the changes to the revolver if you want to. Let the accredited smith do the job.

There should be other shooters who can back the gunsmith's claims by actually trying someone else's gun to verify this. Try severlal person's guns before taking the plunge.

This may be playing it safe, but then having a messed up action, and having to pay or undo the mess one's self is not a prospect that one wants to have to face.
 

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In a twisted way I actually like the heavy trigger on my M94. Now before you all start to wonder if I've lost what little sanity I may have possessed give me a moment. That heavy trigger makes your normal revolver triggers feel so much better by comparison. My M85 has a nice trigger but after I've put several dozen rounds downrange with the M94 the M85 feels light and just great by comparison. And I can use larger grips to simulate a larger gun for practice.

Steelheart
 

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Steelheart, you're psychic. ;)

What he's alluding to in a sense is, since we both usually come in on these threads, is that the 94 makes a heck of an "understudy gun" to the centerfire revolvers. There's just enough heft,balance, and size comparison to make this a worthy practice gun instead of shooting the more expensive centerfire guns.

One can shoot more.22lrf ammo cheaper than one can for the bigger bores. More practice, possibly more proficientcy.

Less wear and tear on you, the big bores, and your pocket book.

Every practice session needs realistic goals. What is it that needs to be worked on to become better and what steps are to be used to get there.? Making it simple is usually the best way. Just shooting for shootings sake does not necessarily improve one's ability ot hit accurately in double action or single action.

Various aspects of defensive shooting can be worked as needed.

With the rimfire revolver, these aspects can be worked with much less overall problems.

While the big boomers can be more fun to light off caps, general quality practice can be done with the rimfire. Doesn't mean one never practices with the centerfire revolvers. Some practice to stay current is always a good idea.This just means a practice with centerfire revolvers need not be as much as one would assume needs to be done. There is another cheaper, easier on the gun and owner way to get things done. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
+1 Qwiks draw, aside from that I got the 94 for my son I use it as a start off point or warm up for my 608 and other DA guns.

As far as the trigger, stoped by the LGS and they had a 94 4" blue one there and I asked to see it and check the trigger. It was better than mine. Not as hard to pull and smoother. Then I had to hear the speach about the 94 sucks and I should get the S&M 617 BLAH BLAH.

I think mine might need some work to be done on it.

Any good 94 smiths in the Miami area? I dont want to wait for Taurus repair unless it's the last resort.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Finally broke down today and took my 94 apart. While take down found a 3/8” X 3/8” piece of shaving next to the hammer near the spring area. Took all parts out cleaned, polished and lubed. Once together what a difference it made with the pull. No more sticking and much smoother.

Next order to Midway I’ll get the spring set and gives them a try.
 
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