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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I noticed that my 851 had a bit of end shake, from the beginning. However, with the standard springs, it never gave a problem - so I paid no attention to this. With the lighter Wolff springs however, I got consistent FTF's. So, for some time, I simply used the gun with the standard springs.

A few days ago, I decided to embark on a project with the 851, to find out why it didn't work well with the lighter springs - and to correct this. I stripped the gun to the frame and checked for burrs, rubs, etc......polished all the parts....and so forth. No reason to suspect anything there, as all was good (other than one hammer rub, which had long since been taken care of, there was no evidence of any internal problem). So, I turned my attention to EXTERNAL causes.

What I realized was that, as the cylinder movement had never changed from new, the gun probably had a bit too much end shake from the beginning. A bit too much for the LIGHTER springs - NOT the standard weight ones, as provided from the factory. As I said, the gun has always functioned perfectly with the standard springs. But, even a small amount of "excessive" end shake can cause FTF's. So, I set about to correct this issue.

On the Taurus, cylinder movement ("end shake") is controlled by a bushing, installed over the cylinder shaft tube, which abuts a recess in the front of the cylinder - and is sandwiched between the cylinder and the base of the yoke, when the cylinder/ yoke assembly is together. Anyone who has had their cylinder assembly apart (on their Taurus) should know what I'm talking about.

So, obviously, a new bushing was in order, if the end shake was to be reduced. What I did was, very simply, make a new bushing out of brass, to the dimensions required. I used as a source for the brass an 8mm Mauser rifle case. I found that a short section, cut from (the front portion of) the body of the rifle case fit perfectly on the cylinder shaft tube. After working the brass down, step by step, to the proper length dimension......and thinning the wall thickness a bit.....it fit perfectly. I polished the new bushing and made sure to remove any burrs, etc.

The gun now functions fine, as before, except that there is now no more than about 0.001" of fore and aft movement possible for the cylinder, in the closed position. Before, the cylinder would move 3 or 4 times as much. The forcing cone gap is now wider than before, but it measures at 0.006", so it is still within specs.

I will take the gun to the range soon, to give it a full test. I'm betting that it will (now) go bang every time, with the lighter springs. The trigger pull is now light and smooth, yet there is still enough movement to prevent binding or excessive wear.

The whole purpose of this exercise, actually, was to see if I could make the gun acceptable for the wife of a good friend (who is also a good friend). She has desired to take up shooting, as well as obtain a suitable small revolver, for some time. I have been helping in the search.....and so far, almost everything has had an unacceptably high trigger pull, even the older S&W J-frames. So, I am happy that this project has been successful, pending a successful range test. If that turns out well, the 851 will go to her, as a gift, to start her off with a good, reliable revolver that she can use and enjoy. The 851 had had more than 1700 rounds through it....and it certainly qualifies as reliable. It also has been quite accurate. My friend hand loads, as I do, so he will take up the best load for the Taurus, as per my load testing.

Makes me feel good to pass the Taurus on like this. Good Kharma, too (which I can always use).


Oh, I almost forgot......a couple of photos below.
 

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Maybe that is why my snub didn't like the wolf springs either. Trigger pull was great, but would fail to fire almost 40% of the time. Rounds would usuall go bang on the second time around the cylinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I would suspect that is a good possibility. Even a small amount of excessive movement can cause FTF's. Many people do not have FTF problems with the lighter springs, so it follows that the end shake on their guns is probably less. It is obvious to me that, the bushing I spoke about is the means by which Taurus sets the end shake on each gun at the factory. It would be easy to get it slightly wrong with some guns, not others (we are only talking about movement of a few thousands of an inch, after all). This may be why Taurus specifies such stiff springs in these guns - to cover the range of tolerances.

End shake is a common issue with S&W's.....but is easily fixed. It is a bit harder with the Taurus, but still fixable without too much trouble.

I'll do a range test on Friday. I will report my results.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Success. Not one failure to fire !.....with the lightest springs (that Wolff offers) in the gun. No function problems of any kind. Accuracy was just as before.

Just as I suspected, "end shake" was the problem. Well...... problem solved.
 

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How do I take the cylinder off the crane??
I have a 608 with an endshake problem mI would like to try this with. I have lots of experience with S&W revolvers and have removed the crane from my gun but am not sure how to disassemble the crane assembly.
 
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