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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought my 6" model 66 in summer of last year. On my very first outing it shot just about dead on. I was very happy. The more I took it out and shot it it seemed to be shooting left so I adjusted the back sight to the right. I've probably shot it about 10 different times and I have the back sight cranked all the way to the right as far as it will go. It still shoots to the left. Have any of you fellas seen this happen? It seems like it got worse every outing. I have other handguns that I shoot fairly regular and they shoot right where I have them sighted in.
I really love this gun and I don't want to sell it. should I just send 'er in?


RussP
 

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diagnostictarget.jpg

Check this out and think about how you are shooting the gun. Are you using the same ammo as before? Check the timing of the cylinder, making sure it is in line with the forcing cone. I am sure you have cleaned the barrel well before shooting. If you cannot figure it out, give a call to Taurus CS and see what they have to say.
 

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Also try shooting it from a rest at 5-7 yards and have someone else do the same. Good luck and report back the results.
 

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Patience and education are the key. I know it can be frusterating , but you just can't go around shooting people on the left. :)
 
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I bought my 6" model 66 in summer of last year. On my very first outing it shot just about dead on. I was very happy. The more I took it out and shot it it seemed to be shooting left............RussP
Whatcha shooting (Load wise) Try some 148 HBWC & something like a Hoppes Tornado brush to delead the barrel, (Not that I think lead is the problem.) Check out this video...
 

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. trigger control chart.jpg

Seriously though, check this out:

trigger control.png

I currently have 3 revolvers and two semi's. I have sold two other semi's.

Every one is uniquely different in how they are held.

When I bought my Pt 24/7, I was already used to my PT 809c and held it the same way. Just like you, it shot good at first, but as I continued to shoot it, my impact did not match my sights. Turns out I was slowly changing my grip ( no big deal) , but more importantly, I was changing how I pulled the trigger and my finger position on the thrigger.

One pistol had a wider and curvier trigger so it felt a certain way. The newer pistol had a skinnier and straighter safety trigger and because it was different, i put my finger on it in a different way to make it feel the same as the first one.

Result was, I was positioning my finger wrong in order to make it feel right.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
. View attachment 113271

Seriously though, check this out:

View attachment 113272

I currently have 3 revolvers and two semi's. I have sold two other semi's.

Every one is uniquely different in how they are held.

When I bought my Pt 24/7, I was already used to my PT 809c and held it the same way. Just like you, it shot good at first, but as I continued to shoot it, my impact did not match my sights. Turns out I was slowly changing my grip ( no big deal) , but more importantly, I was changing how I pulled the trigger and my finger position on the thrigger.

One pistol had a wider and curvier trigger so it felt a certain way. The newer pistol had a skinnier and straighter safety trigger and because it was different, i put my finger on it in a different way to make it feel the same as the first one.

Result was, I was positioning my finger wrong in order to make it feel right.

I like the eye correction chart. Funny stuff there. I typically use method #2 with the first distal (spell?) joint. it feels natural to me. Maybe I need to use the end of my fingertip. Thanks for the tip and I will post a report with my corrections.
I saw another fella had the same issue and I thought maybe my gun had the same issue. I'm typically a good shot.

RussP
 

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I like the eye correction chart. Funny stuff there. I typically use method #2 with the first distal (spell?) joint. it feels natural to me. Maybe I need to use the end of my fingertip. Thanks for the tip and I will post a report with my corrections.
I saw another fella had the same issue and I thought maybe my gun had the same issue. I'm typically a good shot.

RussP

Between my Pt 24/7 G2 9mm, PT 809 9 mm , and M65 .357 ... I have to hold my hand in a different position to use the same spot on my finger. Grip thickness, angle, and distance between grip and trigger are all different.

My Pt 809 fits best, then the 24/7 is not too far behind.

I am going to have to buy a different grip for my M65 as it is too short a distance. The only way I know to describe it is that it's like a bowling ball that has the right size holes, but they are just a little bit too close to each other.
 

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If you are still having enough trouble even after you do all that then you will have to look at your mechanical issues like the sights or barrel alignment. Sometimes machining can be a little off when they crank these things out.
 

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I do know that .357's have a tendency to lead their barrels and effect accuracy, especially the higher powered loads. Have you been using jacketed or lead bullets? Some of the plated bullets will strip off the copper plate at velocities above 1250 fps. Perhaps a good cleaning for lead with return your 66 to its glory.
 

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I second that Bruntson, check for lead and copper fouling, also check the crown for dings. Are there any signs of leading at the forcing cone?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I do know that .357's have a tendency to lead their barrels and effect accuracy, especially the higher powered loads. Have you been using jacketed or lead bullets? Some of the plated bullets will strip off the copper plate at velocities above 1250 fps. Perhaps a good cleaning for lead with return your 66 to its glory.
Most of the ammo has been American Eagle 158 gr. .357 Magnum. I also bought some Buffalo Bore 158 gr. They really rip. I also have some WWB 38 sp and 357 that is 110 gr. but I don't really count them. The wife shoots the 38 sp.
I will check for lead or copper fouling but I gotta tell you I'm pretty anal about cleaning up my guns after a shoot.
Thanks for the tips guys. I will try to shoot more this weekend but its pretty cold up here in Central NY.

RP
 

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Maybe look at the barrel crown as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I second that Bruntson, check for lead and copper fouling, also check the crown for dings. Are there any signs of leading at the forcing cone?
I reckon I am using all sorts of lead, jacketed and semi jacketed. i use whats available to me when I want to shoot. I wanted to be sighted in for the Buffalo Bore mostly for deer hunting at close range. Thats where I keep the sights. All the others I just try to keep groups and not worry about the target POI.

RussP
 

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This dummy would like to find a LEFT HAND trigger control chart. Do such a thing exist?
Just reverse everything on the right handed chart and you will have it. But, leave the top and bottom alone.:D

 
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This chart is one of the dumbest things ever put out. It's been around for a long time and has had people chasing demons for years. I can give 50 different reasons for why a bullet would hit in a particular place on a target.

How is it that I can take a pistol, flip it upside down, pull the trigger with my pinky, and hit bullseyes at 15 yards if this chart was correct?

It comes down to three key fundamentals: a steady gun, a good sight reference, and good trigger control. Period.

Yes , I've been shooting and teaching all levels of shooters from beginners to competitive folks to SEALs and other SPECOP guys all over the world for over twenty years. Most instructors and self proclaimed experts over complicate marksmanship. A lot of them try to attach their name to a particular technique or claim some new method for how to hit a target. It ain't that complicated, it just takes proper instruction and practice.

Stick with fundamentals: Grip, stance, sight alignment, sight picture, trigger control, breathing, and follow through. Once that is down - steady gun, sight reference, trigger control. The main thing is building consistency.
 

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This can help.

Having a mentor who can give constructive feedback or constructive criticism helps one get into good shooting habits. Even us old vets can take a page out of that play book from time to time. The reason for this is it is too easy to concentrate too much or not enough.

Having a mentor along who knows about shooting techniques for revolvers is important.
 
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