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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a model 66, 6" barrel in stainless. The trigger and hammer feel gritty. This gun being new I assume this either dirt from shipping/storage, or possibly roughness from manufacturing. I am planning to tear it down and wash all its parts and see if it is any better. Are there any parts in particular I should look at polishing? The inside of the frame looks pretty rough, but I don't want to get anything out of tollerance. I have lots of rifle and shotgun experience but have never worked on a revolver before. Is this roughness common to the SS models? My other taurus is a blued model and pretty damn smooth.
 

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My 617 in SS was not gritty from the beginning, taking it apart for a good cleaning is a good idea. Also look to see if the side of the trigger is showing any wear marks, if so you may as well polish it while it is apart.
 

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My new model 66 felt "gritty" especially over the trigger return. It will smooth out with some dry-firing. Of course it never hurts to take ths side plate off and clean off some of the grease either. While you are at it you can replace the hammer and trigger springs with a Wolff reduced power set which will help out the heavy DA trigger pull.
 

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See the link below:
Smoothing the Revolver Action | More | Guns & Ammo

Note that there are several warnings about NOT REMOVING ANY METAL. If you are going to attempt this be very careful. You could mess up tolerances if you over do it. Good luck!:eek:
 

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First and foremost (if you have the skills) remove the side plate and disassemble revolver using the revolver disassembly guide from this site (in the revolver section). If it is a stainless steel (SS) model make sure you are using a good gun-smithing screwdriver since the (SS) screws are really soft and easy to fubar. Soak all the parts with your choice of gun cleaner (Break Free seems popular here) I use ballistol. I would not file or sand paper any internal parts even though there are a few that might benefit from it. If they become slightly out of tolerance and not functional you will have to send the entire gun back since all trigger and hammer assemblies and or parts are restricted, not for sale. Also be very careful with the springs in making sure you retain them. If you launch any like a hand spring, or trigger spring and can't find it, back to Miami it goes. Soaking the internals and thoroughly cleaning the frame will ensure that you clean off any residual packing grease. There are a few areas you may want to file ever so slightly, but only if you're experiencing rubbing/binding in the action. For example if the hammer is rubbing on the frame you could sightly file the area of the frame where the hammer seats. On the recoil shield where the hand protrudes through the frame sometimes there is a little ridge on the outside part of the frame that you can smooth out. The same goes for the slot in the bottom of the frame where the cylinder stop protrudes through the frame. If you smooth these areas make sure to do so when the frame is empty of parts;) ofcourse.
Once the gun is thoroughly cleaned and parts are back in, lubricate it generously with your choice of gun oil. The next step is to shoot it ALLOT! This is one of the best ways to smooth out the action and most enjoyable I might add. Snap caps are also your friend. Dry fire with snap caps obsessively.
Good Luck and Enjoy!
 

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Just try buffing some of the metal to metal contact areas first. I would not mess with the hammer to trigger areas at first, only later if you really have to.Firing the gun will smooth out the sears over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I am reluctant to touch the contact surfaces of the triger and hammer, but was wondering about the back face of the frame window. It seems very rough and the cylinder seems to bind occasionaly. I was a bit unsure about this surface as it seems like the point at which headspace would be determined. I was considering working the rough spot over with a 1200 grit or finer lap. I don't think I would take much off , but again am worried what 1/2 a thou there might mean to headspace. The trigger and hammer smooted up completely with a complete degreasing and a bit of oil. Unfortunately I lost the retaining spring and plunger when I disassembled the gun. New parts are on the way, but I dont get to see how much improvement I made until they arrive. I would really prefer not to remove any metal if its not necesary.
 

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The headspace should be .060" to .064" with standard cartridges for your caliber. If there is raised metal on the recoil shield in the area of the firing pin hole (back side of frame window), it should not be there and be filed/polished off. However, that may not be what is causing your binding. Is binding occurring with cartridges inserted? What about empty? Search the forum on how to check headspace.
 
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New out of the box, my 605 in titanium was a bit gritty and stiff. The cylinder would turn ok, but would not free-spin. The ejector felt gritty. A good cleaning and several hundred rounds down the pipe and it's as smooth as silk.
 

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While it could be a matter of cleaning and breaking it in to get rid of the gritty action, it sounds like there are other issues at play here. There should not be raised metal in the recoil shield area...
If you feel that this is beyond your ability, I would send it back to papa Taurus.
 
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