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I did a search and could not find this question.

  1. I have heard from friends that it is not good for a mag spring to store mags loaded.
  2. I have heard that mags can be stored partially loaded.
  3. I have heard that some leave their mags loaded but rotate the bullets and mags every 2-4 weeks

How do you store your mags ?


I know opinions are like left ears, everybody has one. But, what is your opinion ? Over thinking it ?

thanks
martin
 

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It's not being loaded that wears out a mag spring. It's the loading, emptying, reloading: The compression and release over and over that does it.

Every time a spring is compressed or twisted ( depending on spring action and type) it is a very slow version of bending the metal back and forth until it one day breaks. VERY, very slow version of it.

Rotating bullets is for the bullets sake, not the springs. You can slowly compress a bullet down by chambering it over and over.
 

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^^^What he said^^^
Springs compressed or relaxed won't wear them out, movement does.
My BIL took his Dad's 1911 from the Korean war, with a loaded mag (*assuming this was put up right after Korea) and took it out shooting, not a hiccup.

*His father had the firearm locked up and the BIL never even knew it existed until his father passed away.
 

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It's not being loaded that wears out a mag spring. It's the loading, emptying, reloading: The compression and release over and over that does it.

Every time a spring is compressed or twisted ( depending on spring action and type) it is a very slow version of bending the metal back and forth until it one day breaks. VERY, very slow version of it.

Rotating bullets is for the bullets sake, not the springs. You can slowly compress a bullet down by chambering it over and over.
What he said!
 
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I have some that are left unloaded and others that remain loaded, for over 28 years and they all work just like they did 28 years ago. I have not changed a single spring in any of them. Yep, there are some that will break and become week, but that is not the norm.
 

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You will hear a lot of opinions both ways but the truth of the matter is a spring will only wear out with continuous compression and decompression. Loaded or not there will be absolutely no effect on the spring during storage unless there's a lot of moisture then you may have rust issues. Store in a dry place however you want.
 

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I keep my mags loaded at all times....just my humble opinion, but you know what opinions are like......

 
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It's not being loaded that wears out a mag spring. It's the loading, emptying, reloading: The compression and release over and over that does it.

Every time a spring is compressed or twisted ( depending on spring action and type) it is a very slow version of bending the metal back and forth until it one day breaks. VERY, very slow version of it.

Rotating bullets is for the bullets sake, not the springs. You can slowly compress a bullet down by chambering it over and over.

2cents.gif What he said.... smiley thumb.gif
 

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I keep my mags loaded at all times....just my humble opinion, but you know what opinions are like......

I totally agree. All of mine stay loaded 24/7. Never had an issue and they're ready when I need them!
 

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What Scoutfish said. Don't sweat it. This why when you attend a defensive pistol school, they recommend you bring extra magazines, just in case a spring lets go.
 
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What Scoutfish said. Don't sweat it. This why when you attend a defensive pistol school, they recommend you bring extra magazines, just in case a spring lets go.
I always thought the extra mag was incase you missed 14 times and needed to do a quick reload..:)
 

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I had question about spring life and spring maintenance practice a while back and asked a friend about it. He was the chief metallurgist for a major industry, and also a the top IPSC shooter locally. He said that not to worry about it, so I don't if I know the mag has been designed and manufactured by a reputable company.

Spring design is a science and depending on the application, different materials characteristics are more or less important. A spring used in a force storage application will use a low hysteresis material, whereas a spring designed for vibration absorption use high hysteresis material. Magazine springs are of the first type, and car springs are of the second type.

Here is some information from an engineering article about springs and design.

"Perhaps the most important requirement for a spring material is the ability to store a large amount of strain energy. This is usually best achieved by choosing materials with a high ELASTIC MODULUS, E, together with an ability to carry a high stress within the material’s elastic range, that is, without permanent deflection. Depending on the application, it may also be important to be able either to recover the stored energy without excessive losses, or to absorb (or dissipate) as much of the stored energy as possible in order to prevent rebound. A measure of the energy absorbing characteristics of a spring is given by a force-deflection diagram showing the loading and unloading curves. For most spring configurations using metal springs, as in Fig 4-1, the loading and unloading lines are straight, indicating a linear characteristic (i.e. constant stiffness) and the loading and unloading lines are effectively parallel and very close together. It follows that virtually all the energy stored during loading is recovered during unloading. Such materials are referred to as having LOW HYSTERESIS
.
In other applications, such as vibration absorption, it is of advantage to have the absorbed energy dissipated within the spring. Fig. 4-2 shows the characteristics of a material such as rubber or polymer. The loading line is usually curved and of increasing slope, indicating increasing stiffness. Unloading begins with a large drop in force with no change in deflection, then a curved line which may reach zero force before deflection reaches zero – in other words, the material may be permanently stretched by a single application of load. This effect can be observed by stretching an ordinary rubber band. Materials having such characteristics are referred to as having HIGH HYSTERESIS and the area enclosed by the loading-unloading cycle is a measure of the energy lost during one cycle of loading, and hence is a measure of hysteresis."
 

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I had question about spring life and spring maintenance practice a while back and asked a friend about it. He was the chief metallurgists for a major industry, and also a the top IPSC shooter locally. He said that not to worry about it, so I don't if I know the mag has been designed and manufactured by a reputable company.

Spring design is a science and depending on the application, different materials characteristics are more or less important. A spring used in a force storage application will use a low hysteresis material, whereas a spring designed for vibration absorption use high hysteresis material. Magazine springs are of the first type, and car springs are of the second type.

Here is some information from an engineering article about springs and design.

"Perhaps the most important requirement for a spring material is the ability to store a large amount of strain energy. This is usually best achieved by choosing materials with a high ELASTIC MODULUS, E, together with an ability to carry a high stress within the material’s elastic range, that is, without permanent deflection. Depending on the application, it may also be important to be able either to recover the stored energy without excessive losses, or to absorb (or dissipate) as much of the stored energy as possible in order to prevent rebound. A measure of the energy absorbing characteristics of a spring is given by a force-deflection diagram showing the loading and unloading curves. For most spring configurations using metal springs, as in Fig 4-1, the loading and unloading lines are straight, indicating a linear characteristic (i.e. constant stiffness) and the loading and unloading lines are effectively parallel and very close together. It follows that virtually all the energy stored during loading is recovered during unloading. Such materials are referred to as having LOW HYSTERESIS
.
In other applications, such as vibration absorption, it is of advantage to have the absorbed energy dissipated within the spring. Fig. 4-2 shows the characteristics of a material such as rubber or polymer. The loading line is usually curved and of increasing slope, indicating increasing stiffness. Unloading begins with a large drop in force with no change in deflection, then a curved line which may reach zero force before deflection reaches zero – in other words, the material may be permanently stretched by a single application of load. This effect can be observed by stretching an ordinary rubber band. Materials having such characteristics are referred to as having HIGH HYSTERESIS and the area enclosed by the loading-unloading cycle is a measure of the energy lost during one cycle of loading, and hence is a measure of hysteresis."

TRANSLATION::D It's the compressing and releasing that damages springs
 
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I have magazines that fit all three of your scenarios. Some fully loaded, some empty, some partially loaded. They all work just fine. Store them how you want and don't worry about it.
 
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TRANSLATION::D It's the compressing and releasing that damages springs
Yes, for high hysteresis material, but negligible for low hysteresis material. At the end of the first paragraph about low hysteresis above: "It follows that virtually all the energy stored during loading is recovered during unloading."
 
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In over fifty years of hunting / shooting, I've never had a spring failure of any kind. Just from habit, when I put a gun away, it's put away clean and the mag (s) are empty. Like everybody else has stated, no harm in a loaded mag.
 

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Here's the real translation; modern metallurgy has solved a problem that used to sometimes crop up. With modern components, don't worry about it; just use the thing in whatever reasonable manner you'd like to.
 
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Think of a coil spring in the suspension of an automobile. Look how many times the spring is expanded and compressed during use. Too many to count.
 

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An empty becomes a rock.. Great to throw but not good for shooting.:jiml:
 
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