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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a used 85SS from a local gun shop and im having a lockup or timing issue. I searched and didnt see an issue like this with this particular gun so here goes:

When you pull the trigger in DA at just the right speed the cylinder stop doesnt seem to engage the cylinder and it advances past the chamber by about a 1/8 inch. Ive tested it over and over and its not any one chamber, and it isnt consistent. I can pull the trigger 100 times and it wont do it, but sometimes ill get 4 or 5 overspins in a row. Ive also discovered that when this happens if i hold the trigger right before break, i can rotate the cylinder past the next detent, and if i slowly let pressure off the trigger the cylinder stop pops up. Ive taken it apart three times to clean and lube it, and it hasnt gotten any better. I dont know if theres something i can do or do i just have to send it to taurus under warranty. This was supposed to be my new ccw, so i really dont want to give it up for 4-6 weeks, but at the same time, with these lockup issues i just dont trust it for carry.
 

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I'm no gunsmith by any stretch, but if my 85SS did that I would send it back to Taurus for repair.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Forgot to mention:

The cylinder locks up perfectly when using it SA. Regardless of how fast or slow i pull the hammer back, it always advances perfectly.
 

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I just sent mine in for this problem, send it in. This is a warranty ticket.
 

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If you are trying to very slowly use the trigger to turn the cylinder then you aren't helping the action do it's job. The cylinder in almost any revolver needs at least a little bit of inertia or whatever you would call it to move correctly. This is less of a problem with the revolver and more a problem with expectations. If you want to slow fire then using the hammer to fire in single action would be best. But if you want to practice double action shooting then you need to pick up the speed enough so that the cylinder turns with enough momentum to work. Besides, if you are training to shoot the gun then I don't see where you would ever be ever so slowly pulling the trigger to make a shot. I'm not shocked in the slightest that Taurus would accept this as an open ticket fix since they want you to be happy and maybe buy from them again and spread the word about how happy they made you. But I don't see this as a problem with any revolver.
 

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I was having cylinder/trigger problems and found that the front screw was a little too tight. Now it works great. You may want to check that before sending it back home.
 

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I bought a rossi years ago that would heat up when firing and get stuck. They had to file it down. I promptly sold it as I did not trust it for a carry gun after that.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If you are trying to very slowly use the trigger to turn the cylinder then you aren't helping the action do it's job. The cylinder in almost any revolver needs at least a little bit of inertia or whatever you would call it to move correctly. This is less of a problem with the revolver and more a problem with expectations. If you want to slow fire then using the hammer to fire in single action would be best. But if you want to practice double action shooting then you need to pick up the speed enough so that the cylinder turns with enough momentum to work. Besides, if you are training to shoot the gun then I don't see where you would ever be ever so slowly pulling the trigger to make a shot. I'm not shocked in the slightest that Taurus would accept this as an open ticket fix since they want you to be happy and maybe buy from them again and spread the word about how happy they made you. But I don't see this as a problem with any revolver.
I understand where you are coming from, this was my first thought too. The only reason im a little apprehensive about it is that ive dry fired a ton of diffent revolvers, and ive never seen a situation where the cylinder stop fails to come up to lock up the cylinder. And yes, in a self defense situtation, i would be snapping the trigger fast, but ive seen it do it a couple of times even then. I had it advance two chambers with one snappy pull of the trigger, because the cylinder stop failed to stop the cylinder from spinning. My biggest concern is not that it will fail to fire, because one of the great things about revolvers is you can just pull the trigger again. My biggest concern is that it will over advance just far enough to allow the firing pin to contact the edge of the primer while the gun is severly out of time and blow the thing up.
 

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I understand where you are coming from, this was my first thought too. The only reason im a little apprehensive about it is that ive dry fired a ton of diffent revolvers, and ive never seen a situation where the cylinder stop fails to come up to lock up the cylinder. And yes, in a self defense situtation, i would be snapping the trigger fast, but ive seen it do it a couple of times even then. I had it advance two chambers with one snappy pull of the trigger, because the cylinder stop failed to stop the cylinder from spinning. My biggest concern is not that it will fail to fire, because one of the great things about revolvers is you can just pull the trigger again. My biggest concern is that it will over advance just far enough to allow the firing pin to contact the edge of the primer while the gun is severly out of time and blow the thing up.
This is why I sent mine in. You should be able to pull through the action slowly or quickly, the hand should advance the cylinder, allowing the cylinder stop to click in to the detent for each bore. My revolver had a notch in the star assembly of the ejector that was not peened correctly. The hand would not engage it correctly under rotating it. The snap cap for the bad bore showed a line of firing pin hits that went straight across the primer area. When I live fired it prior to discovering the malfunction I would get failures to fire. Once I figured it out I pulled the casings (since I save them) and found a few with multiple strikes on the primer some on center some almost to the corner of the casing. Very very dangerous. This is how revolvers go kaboom. The only inertia necessary is the pressure it takes to pull through the weight of the springs, the action and cylinder should function smoothly whether you go slowly or quickly. If it takes allot of inertia then you probably have rubbing somewhere. With my revolver in addition to the other circumstances they also ended up replacing the hammer and trigger assembly. The point being every once in a while you get a lemon (with any manufacturer), however Taurus will stand by their product. This is not always the case with other used firearms. The other caveat is when buying used revolvers try to inspect them as thoroughly as possible. I bought two used revolvers prior to getting into the habit of inspecting them regularly and both had been traded in for one reason, they didn't work right. The good thing was the warranty was available. Send it in, have them get it right and then enjoy it!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
For all those interested, i have discovered and repaired the issue:

The slot in the frame where the cylinder stop comes through had a lot of burrs around the inside edges. When I would pull the trigger using my right hand it was putting pressure on the trigger to the left, which in turn put pressure on the cylinder stop lever and tweak it slightly so it would drop through the slot and get hung up on the burrs. All i did was deburr the slot inside and out and put the whole thing back together. All is well now, i have dry fired it probably about 75 times since i put it back together and no more over advance.
 

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Ive taken it apart three times to clean and lube it, and it hasn't gotten any better.
ooop. Well, that would have been my suggestion.

Sounds like it's time for a trip to the mothership. Hopefully this can be resolved with one trip.

For all those interested, i have discovered and repaired the issue:

The slot in the frame where the cylinder stop comes through had a lot of burrs around the inside edges. When I would pull the trigger using my right hand it was putting pressure on the trigger to the left, which in turn put pressure on the cylinder stop lever and tweak it slightly so it would drop through the slot and get hung up on the burrs. All i did was deburr the slot inside and out and put the whole thing back together. All is well now, i have dry fired it probably about 75 times since i put it back together and no more over advance.
Ahh. I should have read the whole thread. Good.
 
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