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I just ordered a 16# Wolff recoil spring for my 1993 PT92(if it ever gets here, been 3 days)after reading that will preserve the locking block.
What are you guys thought on getting a new Beretta locking block? Are Taurus blocks tough enough to not have changed over they years? Have they changed?
 

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Having had my locking block break, I'd replace it. Mine was a PT99. I was darn lucky to get my slide off to replace the locking block without sending it in to Taurus. I went with the EFK Fire Dragon locking block, it required some adjustment to fit properly. Definitely wasn't plug and play.

You'd think I'd notice something wrong since I clean it after every trip to the range, but I didn't ever see anything suspicious until it just "went".

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Replacing the recoil spring at a 5000 round minimum and refraining from +P ammunition will do a lot to preserve the locking block. Respect the gun and keep it well maintained and it should hold up extremely well.
 

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Given that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction, heavier recoil springs are a double-edged sword. They will reduce the rearward force, but conversely increase the forward (closing) force.

Know I don't know if that's specifically an issue with the 92, but every time somebody mentions heavier recoil springs I think of a gun I had where it is an issue. Certain High Standard .22's are famous for cracking frames. They are intended to be used with standard velocity ammunition, but people want to shoot high velocity for a variety of reasons. You can put in a heavier recoil spring to protect the frame, but over time the increased closing force peens the breech face. Either is a fatal condition for the gun.

So it's going to put additional pressure on whatever absorbs the closing force. Plus, they cause cycling and feeding issues. I think I'd be more inclined to replace the block and run a stock spring.
 

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Thanks, I'm not adept at fitting anything.
I will let you in on MY secret!
get a much larger hammer, actually a group of assorted size big hammers work even better.
 
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Given that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction, heavier recoil springs are a double-edged sword. They will reduce the rearward force, but conversely increase the forward (closing) force.

Know I don't know if that's specifically an issue with the 92, but every time somebody mentions heavier recoil springs I think of a gun I had where it is an issue. Certain High Standard .22's are famous for cracking frames. They are intended to be used with standard velocity ammunition, but people want to shoot high velocity for a variety of reasons. You can put in a heavier recoil spring to protect the frame, but over time the increased closing force peens the breech face. Either is a fatal condition for the gun.

So it's going to put additional pressure on whatever absorbs the closing force. Plus, they cause cycling and feeding issues. I think I'd be more inclined to replace the block and run a stock spring.
True, but I've been using a 15 pound Wolff Recoil Spring without that issue creeping up. The Stock Beretta 92/Taurus PT92 Recoil Spring is rated at 13 lb.s
I do use fairly full power ammunition all of the time.

I just ordered a 16# Wolff recoil spring for my 1993 PT92(if it ever gets here, been 3 days)after reading that will preserve the locking block.
What are you guys thought on getting a new Beretta locking block? Are Taurus blocks tough enough to not have changed over they years? Have they changed?
AFAIK, Taurus Locking Blocks have not changed and are the same as first generation Beretta Locking Blocks.
Currently, my Taurus PT92 has a second Generation Beretta Locking Block in it, which is it's third, and hopefully last, Locking Block.
Beretta Locking Blocks are currently on a third Generation version.
 
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