Taurus Firearm Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
785 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the reasons I bought a 1911 style gun was the enjoyment of "messing" with it. My wife really didn't understand why I would take a brand new $500 gun and disassemble it into little pieces which I think she thought would never go back together. I have never aspired to be a gunsmith, nor a "wannabe" but I like taking thing apart. I've held a HAM radio license for 25 years for the same reason.

The point being... the PT1911 has an excellent trigger, but can it be "tweaked" with little expense and effort? I tackled the challenge. I ordered the following two items from Midway.

255612 1 $6.89 Ed Brown Competition Mainspring
188154 1 $6.19 Cylinder & Slide Light Weight Sear Spring 1911

These are two options that regularly get mentioned as being things to experiment with. The Ed Brown Competition Mainsprings are 19# mainsprings... 5 to a package. They are easy to replace once you do the research. There was an improvement over the 23# standard spring, but it is not overwhelming. Given the cost and effort, it is worth doing.

However, the Cylinder & Slide Light Weight Sear Spring makes a definite improvement both in weight and crispness. I had no problem with either with the standard, but like most I enjoy looking for that magic 3.5# trigger. Cylinder & Slide state that their Light Weight Sear Spring will remove 1.5# of weight from the trigger and lacking a good trigger scale, I am prone to believe it.

Replacing the Sear Spring is more complicated than the mainspring, since I haven't figured out how to do that without removing the grip safety, but you don't have to touch the fire control features (other than making sure the spring is laying correctly on the right spots). It is about a 15 minute job (for my butterfingers) and most of that is the removal of the grips and the thumb safety. This $7 is well worth the expense and will give you about as light a trigger as most shooters can handle... anything less would be considered as a "hair trigger."

A word of reminder. Never do anything on your gun you are uncomfortable in doing! There are too many shooting buddies who will help you do this task for just the asking. If you can't find a friend, save you money... this is not worth a $30 gun smithing bill. But if you are reasonably capable of doing handy man jobs, you can do this. There is no "filing" and worst case scenario you just put the original parts back in and you are good to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
My wife is use to me taking everything apart to see how it works... and I do mean I take everything apart and put it back together just to see how it works.

1911's are like Harley Davidson motorcylces, you just have to tweak them ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
Taking stuff apart can be a good way to learn about the thing you are breaking down. Of course, there are risks involved... I broke a few computers in the early 80 when I started taking them apart to learn about them. Back then a home computer cost around... oh... five thousand dollars!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
Pierce said:
Taking stuff apart can be a good way to learn about the thing you are breaking down. Of course, there are risks involved... I broke a few computers in the early 80 when I started taking them apart to learn about them. Back then a home computer cost around... oh... five thousand dollars!
I started computing on a Commodore Vic 20... since then I have burnt and blown up many PC's in the name of radical overclocking ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
My first victim was a Comodore Plus 4. I graduated form that to the C64, then to an IBM with a very expensive 10 megabyte (No error in typing that, btw.. yes, MEGAbytes) internal hard drive in it! LOL!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
785 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh! I have found my target group! I bought the "children" a Vic-20 and then realized that you could do basic word processing. I started my doctoral work with a Vic 20 with two 16K memory packs and a hard wired Word Processing card on the three slot expansion. I did enough work with computers to work my way up to a C64 and finished my doctoral work mostly with a tape drive. I still remember the first floppy drive for the C64 and I thought I'd died and gone to heaven.

My first MS-DOS machine was a couple of molded machines that had 246K and two 360K floppy drives. From there is was learning that you could do things yourself a whole lot cheaper than having someone else do that.

The last few machines we have had in our office I built in my spare time. The only one's I haven't "opened up" have been the laptops... way too "high density" parts.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top