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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just thought I'd share a couple pics of my latest casts.
I think I'm slowley getting the hang of it. Getting my melt just right and the temperature dialed in.
I'm finally getting the nice shiny bullets and sharp edges on the grooves.
Casting my own is one of the most fun parts of reloading.
The single mold is a Lee 456-220 1R. This little 45 mold I found in a junk box in a Mom and Pop shop in Fresno.
The double mold is a Lee 90300 2R in 32 caliber.
 

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Nice looking bullets. I've got to get busy myself and cast some 45 and 38's.
 
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good product!!!!
I cast some Lyman 452374, 230 gr. RN for myself today. Need to do several hundred more as time permits. It is very rewarding but can get tedious.
 

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Very nicely done. I wish I had the time and the space to get into casting. Reloading is about my limit right now.
 

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Just thought I'd share a couple pics of my latest casts.
Very nice!

It is very rewarding but can get tedious.
Yeah, it can be. The Lee six-cavity is the way to go especially for handgun.

How much does a round run you when you reload with these cast bullets in .45?
The cost of a home cast bullet depends on how you acquire your lead. If you need to purchase your materials at a place like RotoMetals, a 230-grain bullet would cost you 1¢. My cost for reloading my 45 ACP ammunition counting all components and amortizing both the reloading and casting equipment is 7¢. This is premium ammunition for my PT745 suitable for self defense.
 

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I would be hard pressed to find a cost for anything but the powder and primer. The cases and lead have been with me a long time. Some of my alloy is over 50 years old, some was free, in fact all but the last 800 pounds was free and it only cost me 10 cents a pound and it was linotype from an old printing plant and I salvaged it myself last summer. My molds were found in pawn shops and gun shows a long time ago. Free, I guess, except for the obvious.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yea jim1911, if you can scrounge a little you can pretty much load them for primers and powder. Like guesser and a lot of these guys that have been loading for 100 years, it can cost very little. By scrounging, I mean picking up brass at the range and checking the mom and pop tire shops for wheel weights.
The initial cost of getting started casting in just one caliber, is probably less than $100.
With the price of buying ammunition these days, your savings will pay for it all in a couple of days at the range.
 

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Also being lucky to get involved in this endevour at a point in time that it was easier to secure alloys for just the labor or fuel to get you there, I wanted to point out that even if you are buying alloy it is still dirt cheap.

A bit over a decade ago, I too cleaned out a old print shop obtaining a thousand pounds each of linotype and monotype. I amassed 2 thousand pounds of wheel weights on top of that. I suspect that even at 58 years old and shooting a huge amount of ammunition each year, I will ever need more. If I do, I will mine and render my target berms.

When you use a calculator like that offered above, thank you for the link, be sure to reduce the cost of your brass to reflect the life and loss cycle. When you buy a hundred, it is not just the cost divided by a hundred. I have some cartridges that only get five cycles out of a case and others that get up to twenty. Of course, if you are picking up range brass it is free.

I really think that with the availability of components, casting makes huge sense. By your other components a mid term of a presidential cycle and you will be okay (this isn't a new thing). All the money you will be saving with casting and reloading should allow you to purchase four years worth of primers and powder. That is what I do and I never slow down.
 

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I've been casting like a fool as well, that time of year. Two days ago bullets for the 30-30 Win, 38-55 Win, and 45 ACP. Yesterday, 9mm Luger (1500 of them) and 500 for my 9mm Makarov. Today, 1500 of my 125-grain .358 bullet that I use in my PT138 Pro and will use in the Rossi 351 38 Spl revolver that I picked up last week.



TL358-125-RF
TL367-100-RF
TL457-235-RF
TLC357-135-RF
TLC311-165-RF
TLC380-250-RF
 

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Any supermarket parking lot has plenty of lead....just don't get caught!


Kidding!
 

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Thanks guys. I am getting married soon and starting Police Academy. As soon as I get settled in my new home and done with academy, I plan on purchasing a reloading setup. I'm starting from scratch, and it will take a little bit of money to get started, but I know it will pay for itself with how much I shoot.
 

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Just buy the reloading stuff until you get rolling, cast bullets are not too expensive, and after you load them a while you will have a better idea of what molds you want to buy, it is cheaper to start casting than reloading by a long shot. I just cast 600 225gr 45acp and 250 158gr .38's today, (took most of the day with my 2 cavity molds, future molds will be 6 holers)
 

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Those 6-hole Lee moulds are great for volume. I own three and recommend them. Good luck finding one right now, but order at MidwayUSA and they'll usually ship one to you in about a month.

The 4-banger Lymans are pricier but also produce a great bullet very fast.

Handles for either are extra and a separate purchase from the mould.
 

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Several of us kid about buying "Dead Guy" stuff. Over the years I have bought a lot of stuff both from families and shooters that because of age/health issues were getting out of reloading, casting, bullet swagging. In some cases we bought for pennies on the dollar. Some we paid high dollar for not because it was worth so much but because of the financial needs of old friends or their families. In those cases owning something of theirs is a priceless treasure. On the cheap side of it for a few hundred you can often get several thousand worth for pennies on the dollar. Things you don't want or use can usually be traded with friends. Sometimes given to another shooter that will use. Somewhere down the road those type gifts usually have a seed sown return. Good example is a guy that I gave some stuff to years later gave me a set of wildcat dies worth much more he had picked up in a trade.
 

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As "red" sez above; I have a lot of used stuff, most came out of estates, some I knew and some from not known. Nearly all my molds are used, some bought on the "net" and some from estates and gun shows. I only have about 60 molds now, down from over a hunnert a couple years ago. I buy, try and sell. I seldom buy a new gun, I much prefer used, older models. I like old sights on my old guns. I'm old enough that the 22 Magnum, introduced by Winchester in 1959, is still new and I still haven't convinced myself that it is worth my time and money; after all, what I already have still works.
 
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Thanks guys. I am getting married soon and starting Police Academy. As soon as I get settled in my new home and done with academy, I plan on purchasing a reloading setup. I'm starting from scratch, and it will take a little bit of money to get started, but I know it will pay for itself with how much I shoot.
Jim, In what county are you a police officer?
 
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