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Discussion Starter #1
Is this possible or is it just inaccurate reporting? I guess the guy was racking the slide to clear the gun of the bullet in the chamber but the slide slipped and closed and fired a round into his son's stomach. He must had his finger on the trigger and pulled by accident, right? Probably did not pull far back enough for ejector to eject round and the momentum forward caused his finger to fire the gun? (single action at that point) I thought most guns had a firing pin block if gun was dropped it would not fire.

Story below:



LIBERTY - Police said a Cortland man was lucky to see the new year after his father accidentally shot him in the stomach while trying to unload his handgun.

Travis T. Chalker, 18, 2863 Niles Cortland Road, was sitting in the basement of his father's 246 Mansell Drive home Dec. 27 while Rodney Chalker attempted to clear a round from his gun.
Police Chief Richard Tisone said Chalker told police he pulled back the sliding mechanism on the Kimber Ultra CDP II large-caliber semiautomatic handgun when it released forward and fired a bullet into his stomach at point-blank range.

Officers arrived to a hysterical home. Travis Chalker's grandmother and sister were in the house and were crying when officers arrived. Chalker's sister, 9, was in the room when the shot was fired.

Officers found Travis Chalker lying on the floor with a gunshot wound to the left side of his stomach. The bullet casing was found a short distance away. Officers seized two magazines and 10 rounds of ammunition.
Chalker's grandmother, Tamara Glaspell, told officers she was in the kitchen when she heard a sound like a firecracker then yelling from the basement.
Travis Chalker was taken to St. Elizabeth Health Center in Youngstown where he was treated for a flesh wound.

Tisone said after an investigation, officers determined the shooting was an accident and no charges will be filed unless additional evidence is found.

''That was very lucky, no question about it," Tisone said. ''I've seen people die from a single gunshot wound from a 20-caliber and people take point-blank shootings with 40s and 45s and live. A lot of it has to do with luck.''
Tisone also said it's always important to remember to practice gun safety techniques when dealing with any type of gun.
''I think obviously accidents happen,'' he said. "I'm certain that in no way, shape or form did he intentionally shoot his son. I think when dealing with a gun, you should always assume it's loaded. And therefore, the next thing you never do is point it at anyone. You should always make sure you are pointing the weapon in a safe direction when handling any weapon."
 

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Unless the sear was damaged from an improper trigger job or from disassembly I would think he would have had to manipulate the trigger in some manner.
 

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If he's inexperienced enough to be pointing it at somebody while he's clearing it, then he's inexperienced enough to have his finger on the trigger while clearing it.
 

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Short answer...he pulled the trigger. :(

Had the gun been pointed in a safe direction, with his finger off the trigger it would have never occured.

What part of that sentence don't people understand? :mad:
 

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Sounds like he was pointing it at himself. Yikes!
They both have the same last name, so the article is confusing, but the lead says a guy shot his son.
 

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It does have a very sensitive trigger. I have had a couple of ADs with mine from recoil alone. Luckily they were all still pointed down range at the time. Mine were probably from not trapping the trigger properly between shots. I must have let off just enough to release the trigger and during the recoil pull it again. But just by racking the slide? I don't think so.
 

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This is why my firearms safety instructor told me to always treat a weapon as if it were loaded I.E. "don't point it at anyone, Stupid!".... It could have just been an accident, but he should be able to handle firearms anymore. If the Kimber was defective in my hands when I racked the slide back to clear it, it would have went right into the floor, faced away from anybody else.
 

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I completely agree with everyone that pointed in a safe direction with finger off the trigger would have prevented this shooting.
I will add that the II in the name means it does have a firing pin block but Kimber does it a little different, instead of the trigger working a set of levers to push the firing pin block out of the way, Kimber uses the grip safety to push it. In theory a std 80' series FP block could prevent a slam fire but since your hand will be on the grip safety, it would not help on a Kimber.

Not that it bothers me, the 80' safety was put on to prevent the pistol from firing when dropped and many companies can pass the drop test without the extra safety by using a lighter firing pin, HD firing pin spring or both.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
UPDATE:
this is from the father who shot his son by accident...I guess he is lucky it did not hit anything important on the inside.

Rodney Chalker said he always keeps his gun locked, with the safety on and one bullet in the chamber. He opened the case, and took out the gun.
He said he didn't want to give a loaded gun to his son, Travis T. Chalker, 2863 Niles Cortland Road and a junior at Lakeview High School. The younger Chalker is a gun novice who recently took an interest in shooting at a range.
He said he made sure he pointed the gun about 90 degrees away from his son and his 9-year-old niece, who was sitting on the opposite side of the room.
Rodney Chalker pulled the slider back to take the bullet out. Travis was sitting on the computer chair next to him.
"I lost the grip on the gun," he said. "All these years being around guns, my whole life I've always been told if you drop a gun, never try to grab it. But I reached for the gun, hit the two safeties and pulled the trigger as a I grabbed it. That's how the gun ended up getting pointed at him."
His son was hit in the abdomen.
Rodney said he was immediately in a haze, as if his heart had stopped. He lifted his son up and put him on the floor. He checked for an exit wound and found it. The bullet traveled into his stomach about one inch left of his bellybutton. The bullet traveled out his left side.
"Once I found the exit wound, I felt a lot better," said Rodney Chalker, a retired computer and robotics specialist.
 
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