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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
You can find a lot of articles on google concerning this these days, in the wake of the vegas shooting. Most of them are a little old, and talk of printers that cost in the $500-1000 range as a minimum for you to be able to do this, but you can make parts now on ones that cost as little as $200

Never really felt a need for a bump fire myself, mainly cause i am far to cheap to shoot ammo that fast. But i did find some of the things you can do with a 3d printer to be highly interesting. i don't get to the range nearly as much as i used to. and i couldn't use one of those stocks at the range i go to anyway, so i couldn't test it even if i did print it. Based on what i have seen of the files, im betting the material cost for printing one would be around $15-20, i do own a 3d printer, so my estimate is based on stuff i have printed, the cost goes up depending on how solid you make it, an average 1kg spool of material tends to run between $20-30 and 1 spool would be more then enough even if you printed it 100% solid

Still thought i would share in case someone else might be interested. the files for it are easy to find, wont post them cause im not sure of the forum rules about that, and should those stocks get banned having links to the 3d printed ones on the forum might not be a good thing for us.

i will however post this link
https://www.thejacknews.com/law/gun-rights/how-to-3d-print-bump-stock-congress-ban/

 
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How expensive is a bump fire stock? Because this seems like an expensive alternative to simply buying one, but then again I have no idea how much they cost.
 

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The most expensive part of the bump fire stock is the ammo you will burn through in a short period of time.
 
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That's because cheap 3D printers produce low quality items. You get what you pay for. Our printers at work are over 10k each. They produce great quality work.

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For 10K a piece they should be able to make diamonds out of old plastic Pepsi bottles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
It also has a lot to do with the quality settings you set when you make your print, as well as the item your printing, if anything is low detail, then you get low details, but even cheap 3d printers can produce some really good results, it all depends on how you set up the print, higher dollar printers yield results faster, and in certain cases are of course better, but a sub $500 printer can do some amazing things if it has the right settings.

Those 10k ones probably use a laser and create the item from a pool of resin and create the item from the top to the bottom, the cheaper ones use spools of filament and melt it to lay layers of the item from its base to the top, they are generally not able to produce the same details as the laser resin kind because they use a nozzle to push the melted plastic through. instead of a laser to turn liquid resin into a solid.

it all comes down to how much time your willing to put into it, higher detail = more time to print, for something like the stock in the video, the guy probably wanted to print it as fast as possible.

I was also not saying that this is a viable option against buying a real one, i was posting it cause if you wanted such a stock, and already have, or at least have access to a 3d printer, it would be far cheaper than buying one. and of course, should they get banned and you want one......

For a example of what lower cost printers can do, this was made on a $200 printer, took about 8 hours to print, guy did do some painting post print of course, but he probably didnt have to do much in the way of sanding, i have the same printer he says he printed it on, it can do some high detail.
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2667911
Action figure Fictional character Toy Games
 
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That came from a $200 printer? Wow! I had no idea 3D printers had progressed so far.
 

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All the $200 printers seem to print junk from what I've found. Doubling your investment gets much better results from what little searching I've done. I'm doing more research as we speak, though. That's just been my preliminary findings ;) I may need to buy one of these in the near future.
 

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I am just wondering why a couple of you guys with 3 D printers don't make copies of your printers with your printer and give them to us that don't have any???----:dunno:
 

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I was looking at getting a 3D Scanner/Printer combo. Price was not bad and quality looked decent from the reviews. I may start looking at them again as I have a few things I would love to reproduce and potentially sell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
All the $200 printers seem to print junk from what I've found. Doubling your investment gets much better results from what little searching I've done. I'm doing more research as we speak, though. That's just been my preliminary findings ;) I may need to buy one of these in the near future.
This is 100% true, i actually own 2 printers, a tevo tarantula, the $200 printer, and a tevo tornado, the $350 printer, at least when its on sale, think you can get it for around $320-330 now, the tornado takes 20-30 minutes to assemble, vs the tarantulas 6-8 hours to assemble, the tornado needs almost zero upgrades to make it print better, the only real thing you would want to print to upgrade it would be bigger wheels for leveling the bed, the little thumbscrews it ships with are hard to use for that, then print a spool holder, and your gold from that point on. it has nearly double the build size of the tarantula, and just flat outprints it. I had gotten the tarantula from a friend who had zero interest in assembling it once they got it, and since it came from china it was to much hassle to return, he got a new 22lr rifle for his kid and didnt have ammo, so he traded it to me still in its box for a couple of bulk packs of thunderbolts. After i used it for a while i wanted a upgrade and had a birthday about that time so got the tornado.

here are a couple of reviews of the 2 that i have
the tarantula, you can get it in $200 or $240 versions, the cheaper one has a smaller print bed, that gives you 200mm on x axis, 200mm on y axis, and 200mm on z axis, the other one gives you 280 on y axis, that is the only difference. the guy who did this review has a 20 part video series on how to assemble the tarantula, and you HAVE to use the online videos to put it together.

the tornado has a build volume of 300mm x 300mm on the x and y of the bed, and 400mm on the z axis, so you can print 400mm straight up, double what the tarantula has. this video review also shows how easy it is to assemble
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
and this website has a lot of things to print, if you are on the fence and want to see what all is avaliable.

https://www.thingiverse.com/

one of the coolest things about these printers is, you can get a hobbiest version of some 3d modeling software for free, like fusion 360, or blender, (fusion 360 you have to tell them your doing a hobbiest license otherwise it is not free, and that license has kind of a honor system that you wont make stuff for profit) blender is always free. With either of those if you have something you need to make, you can just model it, and print it, or if you cant model, you probably can find what you need or something very like it, online at a site like i linked above. you can also find all kinds of filament to print with, several verieties of plastic, including abs plastic, nylon, flexible filament, glow in the dark, carbon fiber, even wood and metal, but the ones with real metal cost a lot, around 3-4 times what a normal one costs, and are around 70 metal dust suspended in plastic, but the company that makes the metal filament, also makes a chemical that eats the plastic and leaves the metal, making a solid metal print.

You also can increase the quality of your prints by changing out the nozzle the printer is printing with, all of them come with a 0.4mm nozzle, but the 2 i have can both print with a 0.1mm if you set them up right.

this however was printed with a completely stock tevo tornado, so it had its 0.4mm nozzle, it was just printed slow, and with a 0.2mm layer height to maximize the detail. i think this showcases what the printers these days are able to do better then the original image, and this is straight after it finished printing, it is still sitting on the printer even.

Carpet Flooring
 

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That's incredible what the thing can do! Thanks for sharing.

You talk a lot about "depending on how you set it up." What do you mean by that? My wife is even on board with getting one so I'm VERY curious.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That's incredible what the thing can do! Thanks for sharing.

You talk a lot about "depending on how you set it up." What do you mean by that? My wife is even on board with getting one so I'm VERY curious.
I'll give you a run down on what goes into making a print. then will get into the printers and filament. And i am big on free software options for these things. This will seem like a lot of info, i dont want to discourage, i want to inform

First you need something to print, you can either make it yourself, or, download it from a site like https://www.thingiverse.com/ you will get a STL file, but, it needs to be sliced so the printer can see it as slices of the over all item that it prints 1 layer at a time, plenty of free slicers exist, cura is one of the better ones. https://ultimaker.com/en/products/ultimaker-cura-software and it is free, you can get some that cost money, but they really dont offer much over the free ones, and in some causes not any more. After you have your file and slicer you then load the file and convert it from a stl to gcode, that the printer uses to print the object. And this is step one of depending on how you have it set up, in the slicer you can choose how much or how little detail you print, cura even has preset options for course to extra fine, the short version is, those settings determine how fast it prints, and how much quality the print has, more detail = more time, and you could be printing something that takes days to print, things like how thick the layers, or walls of the item your printing are, do you want it to be a solid chunk of plastic, or, do you want it to be nothing but a outside shell and hollow on the inside. That is infill, you can set it from 0 - 100 % rarely will you never need 100% i print most things at 20% if i need it to be strong maybe 40-50% highest i have never printed something was 75% and it was very strong. If you change the default 0.4mm nozzle to a smaller one, you need to set that in the slicer to get good prints, different kinds of plastic print differently as well, the easiest to use is one called PLA, it prints at around 190-230c and you need a heated bed at 60c, but abs for instance needs 240-260c to print, and a bed temp of 100-110c. Get those wrong and you will not get a good print, if, you get any print at all. failed prints usually resemble a big ball of string.

After you choose your settings, and one thing to note, cura is free, but, it is built for a machine that costs well over $2000 and has a filament dia of 3mm, most printers use 1.75mm filament, so you must set that in cura because it defaults to 3mm, and will really mess things up if you dont change it, and i have had a cura update reset that from 1.75 to 3 on me, so always check it when you slice. Cura has a lot of options, you can get into some really detailed setting info. And when it comes to these printers, you can get really good prints on something like a tevo tornado with basic settings in cura, but once you learn what all those settings do, you can get even better results.

The other thing that you have to set up, is the printer itself, the really big advantage of the tevo tornado over cheaper options is, it largely comes ready to print, you have to do very little to be up and printing, on cheaper options you do all the assembly work, and if you do not assemble the printer with a very high degree of precision, you wont get good prints. On something like the $200 tarantula, you might spend 6-8 hours assembling it, but spend another 2 weeks to a month getting it all dialed in for the best prints, but once you do, it will print almost as well as the tornado. you make up what you saved in cost, in time spent getting to that same level, and it never will be as good as the tornado, nor will it ever be able to print as large. But one universal thing all printers will have is, you have to level the bed, and set the distance between the bed and nozzle, both of those are very important, to far from the bed and your print wont stick, to close and it will be squished, if it prints at all, and with the bed having one leveling bolt on each of its 4 corners, you could have 3 level and 1 off, your print will mess up on that off corner. And, if you change plastic type, you have to change the distance between the nozzle and the bed, cause PLA, ABS, Nylon, Carbon Fiber, PETG, Wood, and flexible filament all use different distances, and temps for both the nozzle and the bed. Most people tend to stick with one type of filament, i use pla mostly, but i do have at least 1 spool of some of those others, just cause i wanted to try it.

I would highly recommend a person new to this to get a tornado, having assembled the tarantula, and dialed it in, i cannot stress enough how much easier the tornado is to use. Its like going from a muzzle loader to a ar-15. And i am a person who really likes to tinker, so building the tarantula to me was a lot of fun, and it working pretty well out of the gate was very satisfying, but the tornado right out of the box printed better then my tarantula i had spend 3 months with already. The difference wasnt huge, but it was noticeable. One really big advantage building a kit has over something like the tornado is, you know how the printer goes together and how it works, what parts can get out of alignment and so on, to a greater degree then someone who started on something like the tornado. But, back to the muzzle loader analogy, if you built a kit, your the person who will know how to load a muzzle loader, and reload rounds for modern weapons. the tornado person bought ammo. and would have to learn the reloading. But really it isnt rocket science. these things are pretty simple.

Should also let you know, the tevo tornado is a clone of another printer called the creality cr-10, for the most part they are identical, but the tornado is a little better in a few key areas, first is uses more aluminum, so it is more sturdy, and the other really big difference is, the cr-10 uses a DC heated printbed, the tornado uses a AC heated printbed, so the tornado can get to print temps in between 2-5 minutes depending on what your printing, and the heat is very consistent across the bed, the cr-10 on the other hand, can get to low temp printing temps in around 10 minutes, but, to get to high temp printing, like you need for abs, it has been shown to take 45 minutes, youtube even has a few videos showing them side by side. and how long it takes the cr-10 to heat up, and a couple of the videos even showed them under IR cameras, the tornado bed was a solid color, the cr-10 was hotter in the middle then it was at the edges, by a good 10-15 degrees, and on a large printed item, that could cause the edges of it to curl up, ruining your print.

Last thing to mention, the tornado is brand new, it has been out since aug of this year, and is sold out pretty well everywhere, you order one today, dont expect it for a month and a half to two months. it took a month and 3 days from order to deliver for mine. And of course should anyone want to get one of these printers, or another brand of printer, i will be happy to help you out, but i warn you, i have not been printing for more then around 7 months, and am nowhere near a expert. I do know a few things however, And at the very least should be able to help you find the answer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Oh and in case anyone is wondering why in some pictures the tornado has a green bed and in others a red, that is a build plate sticker that your prints stick to, tevo originally promoed the tornado with a red and black color set, but changed it to green and black after that, my guess is that they had the red surfaces made back when they thought that was the color set they were going with, and are useing up what stock they have on hand, the first few people who got them had 2 red stickers, one on it and a spare, i got a green on the printer and a red as a spare, and some people who got the printer after i got mine have said they got 2 greens.
 

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My daughter works with some that cost around 100k each. She designs cardiac implants. I guess the need dictates the level of quality. Bump stocks bore me. I am interested, however, in why there has been no information released about the Vegas shooting. Did that just go away?
 

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My youngest son uses a MakerBot 3d printer to manufacture components for 3d surgical dummies. All the bones and such, or molds for soft tissue. The MakerBot parts require minimal cleanup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
There are people on thingiverse who have modeled prognostics for kids, you can find arms, hands, and legs, and even animals, like legs for dogs and cats, beaks for birds and turtles, even found a wheelchair for dogs you can print.
 
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