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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it a fad, a phenomenon, a rip off, the best thing since sliced board, I mean sliced bread? Is it too new to tell? :???:



JimL
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Re: I'd like to see rumors, opinions and expecially facts about polygonal riflin

dbsoundguy said:
OK..Jim..
what is this new thing you are talking about ;)... :D
Let's see, which part of that is rumor, opinion or fact?

OK, there are terms like resurrection, etc. Polygonal is apparently very old, but pretty much went the way of the dodo bird, according to Wikipedia. But now you see it here and there. From all I can tell it never appears on cheap guns. Does that mean it is very good and very expensive? Or did it chase the dodo down a hole for a very good reason? One thing about WikiP, if you say something is good or bad they chew you out for commercialism, so no help there.

I thought about saving for a few years and buying a gun with polygonal, but how do I know it won't be out of favor again by the time I can afford an expensive gun?

JimL
 

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I heard (and believe it to be true) that Glock and HK use polyginal rifling to cut down on the manufacturing costs; don't have do change cutters as often as when making rifled barrels... I doubt a few fps you gain is the reason they make them ;)
 

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I found this..so now i know what you are talking about ;)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polygonal_rifling

Here is something else with a pic..
http://t6aluminum.tripod.com/polygonal.htm

Sounds like one issue is the cost to do it..
one thing i read is it is a big cost factor in manufacturing..
I also read that it is easier on the barrel when shooting...
I wonder if the cost of that has to do with cost of these handguns..Dunnno :rolleyes:

I don't think it will go by the wayside after reading that Glock,Hk,Desert Eagle all use it...

so that is about my extent of reading on that...
Learned something though.. ;)
Thanks Jim
 

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When considering HK & Glock, I think it is a European thing. That doesn't convert well when you consider MR, but they may have decided to use what the Europeans were doing, to be different. I don't know, but maybe a call to MR would clear it up.

HK for sure, and Glock to a lesser degree, are combat guns. This may be the reason for the polygonal rifling. This design would be easier to clean, require less maintenance and fewer barrel changes.

That argument worked quite well until I considered the 1911 Colt. Nobody can argue the 1911 didn't go to war. You can, however, make an argument that people would resist changing the Colt much. 1911 lovers want their Colt to be like the original. They want a metal frame, Browning recoil action, land and groove rifling. If you made a 1911 with a plastic frame and polygonal rifling, you would have something that is quite similar in appearance to a USP....in my opinion. Feel free to correct me.


That got me thinking again. Maybe the answer can be found in the ideology of the manufacturers. European military pistol makers may feel it is best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: I'd like to see rumors, opinions and expecially facts about polygonal riflin

kingofwylietx said:
When considering HK & Glock, I think
...
Maybe the answer can be found in the ideology of the manufacturers.
I see you feel certain about it - like me! ;D :D

JimL
 

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Kahr uses the Polygonal rifling in their pistols. They use the button style (regular) rifling in their CW (economy) line.
 

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I thought pologony was illegal even in Utah.
 

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I had a Glock, which I sold to my brother in-law. I had 2 HK's, one a SS .45 USP Match, the other a USP .45 Elite. I still have the Elite, sold the match for a nice profit. I have a slew of other pistols, which would be the rifled barrels.

I have not noticed a difference in accuracy between the Glock and other pistols. The HK's are incredibly accurate and easy to shoot. This is an apples to oranges comparison, as both HK's are target pistols (Match trigger, 6" barrel) and the Elite has a hand-fitted slide. I have not shot a standard HK, but I am thinking of buying one...so maybe I can report back (won't be this year, probably several months at best) when I get it.

As far as the reasoning, without being involved in the R&D side HK, Glock, or MR.......there is no way to know for sure why they chose it. We can only speculate.
 

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Aren't you not supposed to shoot lead bullets in Glocks with Poly rifling. That just another one of the reasons I won't be buying one.
 

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Who shoots lead bullets in a semi-auto pistol with no jacket? The only unjacketed bullets I have ever fired were .45 long colt. That was in a revolver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Re: I'd like to see rumors, opinions and expecially facts about polygonal riflin

At the risk of repeating myself, from a shooters point of view, does anybody have any input on the whether polygonal rifling is more than a sales gimmick?

JimL
 

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JimL, I think Kingofwylietx did provide you a shooters point of view. He used a Glock with poly-rifling as his example.

I have not fired a gun with poly-rifling so I don't have an opinion to offer.
 

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JimL said:
At the risk of repeating myself, from a shooters point of view, does anybody have any input on the whether polygonal rifling is more than a sales gimmick?
I don't think it is a sales gimmick, but it is not the do-all end-all of pistols. I think it is a plus to have a polygonal barrel, mostly because it is easier to clean (from my point of view). The only polygonal barrel I have right now is an HK. It is accurate, easy to clean, and supposedly will remain quite accurate no matter how much I shoot it. HK states that they use a polygonal bore for increased velocity and longer barrel life. They do not mention accuracy or ease of cleaning.

I won't shun a pistol just because it doesn't have a polygonal barrel, which is evidenced by the fact that I have Taurus pistols. But I do consider a polygonal barrel a plus. It is all part of the equation. I think you can find enough information online to support the advantage of polygonal rifling.

A polygonal barrel isn't something where you pick up a pistol, fire it, and say "wow, that was nice....this thing must have a polygonal barrel". There have been quite a few tests of Glock, HK, and other manufacturers. I think the HK polygonal barrel has the longest life. I believe it is rated for 30,000 rounds. That doesn't mean it is worn out, it means it is designed to maintain its accuracy for that many rounds.
 

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My opinion of the GLOCK barrels is that they are easier to clean once they are broken in after a few hundred rounds than conventionally rifled barrels. That is the only benefit that I can really put my finger on. Why do they need breaking in if they are Tenifer treated? I don't know but that's how it works for me.

It seems to me that polygonal rifled barrels could handle higher pressures due to the absence of the sharp angles associated with conventional rifling. If GLOCKs have had an issue with pressure it was in the chamber with certain models and under certain circumstances.

I have drank a lot of the Kool Aid so I tend to believe that Gaston did this for good reason. I have no doubt that every detail of the GLOCK was thoroughly considered to make it function properly even in the most extreme field/combat conditions with little or no maintenance. Like I said - Kool Aid.

ETA: As far as cost, the GLOCK barrels are only cheaper than the most expensive aftermarket barrels with conventional rifling.
 
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