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they weren't soo hard to clean. I have relly been putting a lot of time and effort into getting the 851 scrubbed clean :p
 

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A bore snake won't even touch what I have going on..... as a matter of fact, using the bore snake may have been what got me into trouble in the first place. It doesn't do a good enough job - and crud has built up in the cylinders over time.
I am doing a regimen of using lead remover cloth patches ( being very careful as it will damage blued guns ), letting that sit for a while, then running a brush thru - have actually started using the cordless drill with the brush attached. Then I run patches thru.
I repeat the process using Hoppes. Still haven't got it all, although it's much better.
I'm obviously not the only one with this problem:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=294799

Folks in this thread have to really work sometimes to get their revolvers clean also
 

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I had some "gun brite polish" that really cleaned up the front of the cylinder. I don't really worry much about it, really. I'll clean it off my carry piece more often just because, but it's never gotten so bad as to tie up a gun or anything. I have a buffer wheel on my grinder out in the shop that makes short work of it, though it's easier to pull the cylinder off the gun. REAL easy on my Blackhawks. ;D
 

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Yes... I believe so...
 

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Hmmm, interesting concept. I have the same problem with my Smith642, and yes the crud at the end of the cylinder can be a pain in the butt. However, a revolver is also "generally" more reliable even when the gun is dirty. So, I won't use the cleaning issue as a reason not to buy a revolver. In the time it takes to break down a pistol and clean it, I can have my revolver spotless, assuming I have the right tools and chemicals.

Todd
 

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Without all the facts, it initially sounds to me like there may be an issue with the hardness of your lead bullets.Or, you are are running them to fast(fps)???You should not be getting the leading problems you are talking about under normal conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
BoneDigger said:
In the time it takes to break down a pistol and clean it, I can have my revolver spotless, assuming I have the right tools and chemicals.

Todd
Funny, I have never found this to be the case. My worst, dirtiest semi has never taken as long as even an average revolver cleaning.... I think this is one of the ( albeit minor ) reasons I tend to grab a semi when I only have time for a short range session.

Acerman - Early on, I used lead bullets in a bunch of police reloads I acquired. ( I still have some actually ) I think these were the culprits -- anyway, I'll get her clean but...wow!
 

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Use the following:
1. cleaning rod
2. bronze wire brush
3. some type of solvent
4. put in solvent, put brush on end of rod, scrub hell out of cylinder holes and barrel.
5. using solvent, can also scrub front of cylinder.
6. wipe it dry with soft cloth.
7. clean gun
On SS guns, can use a soft polishing cloth on front of cylnder to remove crud and powder stains.
use hard lead bullets and jacketed ammo. right kind of solvent solves removing leading from cylinder holes and barrel.
 

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I like my blued revolver better because I don't have to scrub those rings off the front of my cylinder as opposed to stainless steel. I usually don't even use a brush, but I bought some magtech lrn recently, and I never saw softer lead in my life! The stuff was turning molten and leaded up the cone and barrel like there was no tomorrow. I have one more box left, and I'm not even sure I'm going to shoot it!
Stick with FMJ or hardcast lead, but the cheap LRN seems to be the worst offender.
A chore boy copper mesh pad wrapped around a brush gets the lead out pretty good. Also, use a jag instead of a slotted tip. That seems to work better as well.
Semi's are easier to clean IMO. But cleaning your weapon is part of the fun of shooting. I like to sit down, take my time, and drink a beer. Only 1 beer though. Drink responsibly please.
 

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I never worry about the "rings" on the stainless guns. I take 'em off once in a while, but hey, cleaning a gun is a labor of love with me. Beats sitting idle in front of the TV.
 

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I only have one revolver (so far). I've found that if I clean it after every range session, no matter if I've shot 50 or 250 rounds, I have a better chance at getting the thing clean. I wrap a couple of strands of a ChoreBoy scrubbing pad around the brass brush & run it through the barrel & cylinder a few times dry. Then I spray some Break Free in the barrell & the cylinder & scrub them again. After that, I just use Hoppe's & patches & give it a normal cleaning. Don't skip the part about running an oiled patch through the barrel followed by a dry patch. I believe that this helps keep the lead fouling to a minimum.
 

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i have had a couple of smith recomend wipeout foaming action ,may try when clp and butch's boreshine are gone. i have had some good luck with military surplus bore cleaner. cheap enough ,also i've always wondered about oven cleaner and what it might do for bore cleaning.no matter what a bush
is part of regular routine.
 

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forgot to mention, i usually try to run a cylinder full of hunting load jacketed bullets to clean out some of the fouling left behind by lead bullets.
 
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