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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just curious does anyone use only ALOX I've been panlubing then sizing the bullet and after sizing I roll them in Alox and it has worked well for me but I was wondering if I could get by with Alox only. I'm just curious if I could eliminate a step. I bought a new RCBS 45 CAL SWC 201 GRAIN mold I poured about a dozen when it came in last week but it is warming up as I write this. I want to see how it shoots compared to the Lee 200 grain SWC that I've been shooting. The RCBS really pours nice looking bullets they are roughly .50 thousandth shorter than the Lee with a larger diameter cone and larger diameter top. I like the way their molds (RCBS) pour I only have a couple.
Thanks for your help
 

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I just tumble lube with Lee liquid alox, then size if I size at all. I don't size unless I need to crimp on a gas check and that's only one bullet. The rest are plain base, no sizing. Actually, the 200 grain tumble lube SWC I cast (Lee mold), is designed not to be sized.

I think you're making this too complicated. :D
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I'm good at that but just trying to cover my bases I had ever heard of WOOD until I bought my first bullet sizer from Lee I've since found a place on E bay that sells Xlox in about a 16 oz bottle for $14.00 and I can't tell the difference I've only tried a little of it though I'm about to finish up my last bottle of alox and I fill the empty bottles with xlox
 
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Well, you confuse me with your word "Alox". Lee produces "Liquid Alox", but the traditional alox is a solid stick sold for Lyman/RCBS lubrisizers. It melts the stick (like a wax) and injects it into the lube grooves as the bullet is sized. Lee came up with Liquid Alox to simplify the process and reduce the costs. It works very well, just tumble the batch of bullets with a drop or two of liquid alox in an old coffee can, no need for an expensive lubrisizer or heating alox sticks.

Not sure what alox you refer to. A common mistake is to use too much liquid alox. You don't see the coating on the bullet, can feel it, but not see it when it is done properly.
 
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I have used the Lee liquid alox with mixed results. OK in revolvers but makes a mess in the magazine tube of my carbines that is gummy and hard to remove.
 

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I have used the Lee liquid alox with mixed results. OK in revolvers but makes a mess in the magazine tube of my carbines that is gummy and hard to remove.
.You are using too much.
 

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The only time you want to size a bullet is when it is more than .0015" over bore diameter. With cast bullets, 0" to .001" over bore diameter as determined by slugging the bore helps the bullet seal properly and prevents gas cutting and leading in the bore. Use a micrometer on those bullets you just cast before you make your next step.
 

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I use white label lube's Delux Liquid Xlox. bought a 32 oz bottle and I've used maybe as much as 4 tablespoons for over 400+ 230/250 gr LRN projectiles. I need to start getting rifle bullet molds as I'm overfull in 45ACP, 45 colt and 9mm.
 

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Sizing does a couple things. In days of old, molds may not have been perfectly round, sizing helps get them perfect, as well as bringing to size and lubing.

Aloxing first will help smooth out the sizing process, gives a little lubricity.
I think you can probably skip the sizing operation and just lube them. Unless you're looking for match grade accuracy.
 

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The only time you want to size a bullet is when it is more than .0015" over bore diameter. With cast bullets, 0" to .001" over bore diameter as determined by slugging the bore helps the bullet seal properly and prevents gas cutting and leading in the bore. Use a micrometer on those bullets you just cast before you make your next step.
I don't even size .358" 105 grain SWCs I shoot in 9mm guns, .355" bore. No need. I am firing them at very low pressures. They're just hot enough to function the actions of my autos and drop the brass just to my right. Of course, these bullets work rather well in my.357" Ruger Blackhawk convertible. I shoot 'em out of a .357 carbine from low pressure .38 loads. They shoot 900 fps from the carbine and group 1.5" at 50 yards. :D I shoot more of these bullets in that rifle than .357. :D

I lube these bullets with liquid alox and see no leading in the 9mm bores.
 
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Maybe so, but I would rather use too much than work my tail off cleaning a leaded bore....

I've read, and I have practiced, just a couple of drops max for a couple hundred bullets. You should feel the tackiness of the lube on the bullets, but not be able to readily see it. I think it might have been in Lee's literature where I read that. Using too much causes more problems than too little. And, leaded bores ain't THAT much a problem, couple of jacketed bullets down the bore and it's all gone. :D I only get leaded bores when I try to push plain base bullets too fast.
 
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