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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I gave my new revolvers a pedicure today.
Cost and Materials:
One roll of green frog tape $0.00 ($4.99 new, but left over from previous painting projects)
One jar - white nail polish $0.00 (cost $1.00 at dollar store, but was used for previous revolvers)
One jar - clearcoat nail polish $0.00 (cost $1.00 at dollar store, but also left over from previous revolvers)

Step 0: Ensure revolver is empty - zero ammo - no ammo in revolver.
Step 1: Leaving the top 3 serrations on front sight post free, cover front sight post with frog tape.
Step 2: Paint exposed 3 serrations with white nail polish (3 coats) Let dry.
Step 3: Paint exposed area with clear coat. (2 coats) Let dry.
Step 4: Remove tape.

Here's what that looks like - and the improvement in Front Sight acquisition and Sight Picture:

This shows the frog tape, nail polish, clear coat, and two 327 revolvers. 0.jpg
Here's a close-up after painting. 1.jpg
After I've removed the frog tape: 2.jpg

And this gives you an idea of how much it improves the sight picture:
3.jpg
 
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I use a micro trim brush and a jewelers hood and free hand them, but my paint dot looks like a softball in the jewelers hood.

My hands may not be steady enough to do that any more. I have a real pet peeve about folks who slop it on. I just got through buffing and polishing paint off of the sides of a front sight that was slopped. I'm not sure if I would use the clear coat in the event I ever wanted to change to day glow or a bright yellow. I never like to put paint over paint and that would be just that much more to buff off.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have a real pet peeve about folks who slop it on.
Yeah, the painters' tape and eyeglasses help me avoid the slop...

I'm not sure if I would use the clear coat
For me - the clear coat means I can clean the revolver after shooting it, and not worry about knocking off the dab of white... It is certainly optional, but I did it here, so I thought I'd mention it.
 

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For those who "paint" front sights, I've been advocating the use of nail polish for years.

It comes in some outragous bright colors, dries quicker, finishes as hard as paint, and is much easier to remove or replace.

I also use it to mark the bases of competition/training magazines.

When you're using a dozen or more mags it makes it easier to isolate problem magazines for repair or replacement.

It also makes it easier to keep up with magazine rotation of magzines used for self defense.
 

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Hint: Degrease pistol, and heat in oven @ 250f for one hour, paint is baked on...lasts long long time that way.

That was a great pictorial on the sight work, ty.
 

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Nice job. I've done similar on a few of mine.
 

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Front sight - Sinful Colors Professional Nail Polish #53 Summer Peach
Rear
sight - Sinful Colors Professional Nail Polish #56 Neon Melon

 

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I use a white base coat and then apply Revlon 'Hot Tamale Red' over the white. Really make the red pop.

Here's a pic of one of my 1911 done this way.

 

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I've been using some bright orange fingernail polish that I found in the Halloween section a few years back.
 

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Thanks for sharing your fine tutorial, complete with pics, with us.
 

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Those all look great guys. I've actually used Wite-Out on my PT92s front sight and now it's much easy to quickly acquire than before. If I were to do it all over again I may go the bright fingernail polish route i.e. something in a bright red, orange or maybe green.
 
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