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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hi every one got a question? how long should it last?

i am new to the shooting world. i got my self a TCP 380 738 C series. i got it used for 150 bucks at a pawn shop i like the way it feels and so light!

i just want to know if there should be anything i should change on gun, parts or cleaning to make it last as long as i can?
any tips or mods or care on tcp?
i did polish feed ramp! was thinking about polishing whole barrel like the look of it!!
and the sight any paint or ideas to make them stand out?
also what is the series stand for A.B.C
2012-10-05 16_46_57.jpg

thank you sorry so many questions i didnt find any post or threads on these subjects for 380
 

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It all depends on the amount of use and how well you maintain it. Everyone will get different results from their firearms. My advise would be to familiarize yourself with your firearm and resist the urge to over clean it. Imo more damage can be done by over cleaning than not cleaning it often.
 

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hi every one got a question? how long should it last?
I own several guns that are a lot older than I am and they still work pretty dang well unlike me that had to retire....:D
However I did wear out a barrel on a 220 swift varmint rifle while hand-loading light speed ammo....
 

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My Grandfathers Remington Scoremaster was bought brand new in 1944, and my Mosin-Nagant is from 1938. Both work flawlessly to this day. Even my Great-Grandfather's 1868 musket functions easily mechanically, i'm just afraid to shoot it without having the barrel and chamber checked for cracks.
 
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I have my grandfather's Colt 1903 model .32 acp made in 1924 that still shoots flawlessly, but there is no polymer/plastic in it, and polymer frames are new enough that I'm not sure anyone knows how long one CAN last. As for the series, correct me if I"m wrong, but I think the A, B, C series are like "generations" of this gun. I have a C series (serial number ends with a C) that apparently has fixes for the 738s of the earlier series. Does that make it a 3rd generation? I don't know.
 
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With the Taurus lifetime warranty.......forever. Something will break or wear out eventually. The most common would be the recoil spring, which a lot of people seem to replace on all guns at 5,000 rounds. The extractor is probably the next most common part to break or wear out on semi-automatics. Really I don't recall seeing on this board any mention of anybody wearing a TCP out. Outside of the guns that had quality issues, the only failure I remember off the top of my head is a broken firing pin. Also a common failure on all guns.

If you figure a minimum of 10,000 rounds for an expectation, 100 rounds a month would get you through 8 years. It would need a recoil spring replacement once probably, and it's likely something else would break in that time frame. That's maybe $3,000 worth of ammo if it's store-bought a couple of boxes at a time. Maybe $1,000 if you reload your own. Which points out that the gun is not the expensive part of shooting, it's the consumable, the ammo, and begs the question can you afford to wear it out?

As far as modifications, I graduated from the if it ain't broke don't fix it school of engineering. Shoot it for a while, if you have a problem address it.

I don't think the A-B-C designations represent engineering changes. Just a numbering series. There's a thread somewhere on the differences between some of the changes. I have an A series. I know there was a magazine design change at A60,000. Mine went back for repairs (failure to extract) after about 1,500 rounds (a guess) and came back with a barrel that was noticeably different in the feed ramp area. I wish I had taken a picture before I sent it in.
 

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Not a lot of mods can be done to the TCP that I know of. Being a pocket pistol meant to do one thing, I wouldnt do much with it. If you do a search for sight paint on the net you will find more than enough products to keep you busy for a while. Congrats on your new gun but dont get discouraged if you have a few problems until you get some rounds thru it. Small pistols like the TCP can be difficult to shoot correctly by some who have been shooting for years, let alone someone just starting out. Not trying to knock you, just letting you know. Put some rounds downrange and have fun. Any questions post a thread and we will help you
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thank u every one was great info now i know more then i started out at! and the warranty for life can't go wrong there!
 

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Barring high volume shooting in competitions, a well maintained firearm will last many generations.

Just to give you an example, there are side by side shotgun clubs today that fire nothing but 1800's vintage guns at their annual meets.

Abuse and neglect do more harm to a firearm than actual use.

Most folks nowadays couldn't afford enough ammo to "shoot out" their guns.
 

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How long it last will depend on it's use. I have "cheap" guns from the turn of the century (20th, not 21st) that look and work just fine, but "well built" guns from the 60s, 70s, and 80s that have had to have work done on them. The TCP is a pocket gun, not a range gun. Shoot it just enough to become familiar with it, and use it for concealed carry. I have mine to the range two or three times a year just to reinforce muscle memory on how to hit the target (reloads), and to cycle a mag or two of SD ammo. Don't expect it to do more than what it was designed to do, and it should last longer than you.

By the way, welcome to the best gun forum on the net.
 

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I have my grandfather's Colt 1903 model .32 acp made in 1924 that still shoots flawlessly, but there is no polymer/plastic in it,

Actually, I thought the grips are phenolic plastic. (or are they wood?) Dang, now I have to go check!

With the Taurus lifetime warranty.......forever. Something will break or wear out eventually. The most common would be the recoil spring, which a lot of people seem to replace on all guns at 5,000 rounds. The extractor is probably the next most common part to break or wear out on semi-automatics. Really I don't recall seeing on this board any mention of anybody wearing a TCP out. Outside of the guns that had quality issues, the only failure I remember off the top of my head is a broken firing pin. Also a common failure on all guns.


I don't think the A-B-C designations represent engineering changes. Just a numbering series. There's a thread somewhere on the differences between some of the changes. I have an A series. I know there was a magazine design change at A60,000. Mine went back for repairs (failure to extract) after about 1,500 rounds (a guess) and came back with a barrel that was noticeably different in the feed ramp area. I wish I had taken a picture before I sent it in.

I agree with Glen, here's why...

The extractor is VERY VERY frequently broken by misuse / abuse. Some people think that they can drop one in the barrel then slam the slide closed and put in a full magazine to get the "+1" capacity. The extractor is designed so the rim of the rounds slide up behind it and hold the round as it is put in then taken out of the chamber. Dropping one in, then slamming the extractor over the rim WILL CAUSE IT TO BREAK. So, don't do that. If you want "+1", insert a mag, close the slide to chamber a round from the mag, drop the mag, top it off and reinsert. Personally, I don't go +1. Even with a low cap weapon like the 700 series.

Firing pins (actually strikers) break commonly due to poor maintenance. The striker channel needs to be kept clean and DRY. Only use a dry lube, NEVER oil. Oil will mix with the powder residue and form a sludge. The sludge will keep the striker from retracting, then when the next round comes up it impacts the striker tip orthogonally. The striker is hardened steel and can take a pounding in the longitudinal direction, but is brittle when impacted at an angle. I remove the strikers and clean every 800-1000 rounds and only (ONLY!!) use dry lube on them. I also flush out the striker channel with spray gun scrubber to keep the residue out.

The other thing is to keep the gun oiled, clean and dry. Sand, grit, dirt, etc in the barrel will score the rifling and cause rapid wear with even one shot. I also like to use synthetic grease on the slide rails in warm parts of the year. Then gun oil in winter. Plastic parts get dry lube coated to minimize wear.

Small light guns like these should still last 20-50k rounds with correct care. But with abuse or neglect will last far fewer. I'd be more concerned about rust from sweat than wear out.

Consumable items in guns are the recoil spring, mag spring, mags, and potentially the striker and barrel. Considering that 1000 rounds of ammo exceeds the cost of the gun... it's not a big deal to me.
 

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Guns range from perfect to not-so-perfect. If something doesn't work right Taurus will make it right and you'll have a perfect gun.
Cleaning has to be thorough at first, there is that famous preservative on all Taurus' make in Brazil, and maybe a tiny bit of trash from the factory assembly line. Some early problems show up from that. After a few sessions at the range you and the gun get more comfortable with each other the good stuff happens. That's when the fun really starts.

Uh, welcome to this site. I hope you will enjoy your TCP for a long time.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
How long it last will depend on it's use. I have "cheap" guns from the turn of the century (20th, not 21st) that look and work just fine, but "well built" guns from the 60s, 70s, and 80s that have had to have work done on them. The TCP is a pocket gun, not a range gun. Shoot it just enough to become familiar with it, and use it for concealed carry. I have mine to the range two or three times a year just to reinforce muscle memory on how to hit the target (reloads), and to cycle a mag or two of SD ammo. Don't expect it to do more than what it was designed to do, and it should last longer than you.

By the way, welcome to the best gun forum on the net.
thank you for info
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Actually, I thought the grips are phenolic plastic. (or are they wood?) Dang, now I have to go check!




I agree with Glen, here's why...

The extractor is VERY VERY frequently broken by misuse / abuse. Some people think that they can drop one in the barrel then slam the slide closed and put in a full magazine to get the "+1" capacity. The extractor is designed so the rim of the rounds slide up behind it and hold the round as it is put in then taken out of the chamber. Dropping one in, then slamming the extractor over the rim WILL CAUSE IT TO BREAK. So, don't do that. If you want "+1", insert a mag, close the slide to chamber a round from the mag, drop the mag, top it off and reinsert. Personally, I don't go +1. Even with a low cap weapon like the 700 series.

Firing pins (actually strikers) break commonly due to poor maintenance. The striker channel needs to be kept clean and DRY. Only use a dry lube, NEVER oil. Oil will mix with the powder residue and form a sludge. The sludge will keep the striker from retracting, then when the next round comes up it impacts the striker tip orthogonally. The striker is hardened steel and can take a pounding in the longitudinal direction, but is brittle when impacted at an angle. I remove the strikers and clean every 800-1000 rounds and only (ONLY!!) use dry lube on them. I also flush out the striker channel with spray gun scrubber to keep the residue out.

The other thing is to keep the gun oiled, clean and dry. Sand, grit, dirt, etc in the barrel will score the rifling and cause rapid wear with even one shot. I also like to use synthetic grease on the slide rails in warm parts of the year. Then gun oil in winter. Plastic parts get dry lube coated to minimize wear.

Small light guns like these should still last 20-50k rounds with correct care. But with abuse or neglect will last far fewer. I'd be more concerned about rust from sweat than wear out.

Consumable items in guns are the recoil spring, mag spring, mags, and potentially the striker and barrel. Considering that 1000 rounds of ammo exceeds the cost of the gun... it's not a big deal to me.
very good info i will look into dry lube for striker and its going to be my defense gun! but i will be going to range to shoot it and to learn its ways and aim! i just want it to last long and not double feed/jam in a situation when i need it. but all this info was very helpful
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Guns range from perfect to not-so-perfect. If something doesn't work right Taurus will make it right and you'll have a perfect gun.
Cleaning has to be thorough at first, there is that famous preservative on all Taurus' make in Brazil, and maybe a tiny bit of trash from the factory assembly line. Some early problems show up from that. After a few sessions at the range you and the gun get more comfortable with each other the good stuff happens. That's when the fun really starts.

Uh, welcome to this site. I hope you will enjoy your TCP for a long time.
thank you
 

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As the 738 is similar in operation and construction to the Keltec 3PAT, Keltec advertises a useful life of 5,000-7,000 rounds, which is a lot of shooting from a pocket .380 as few folks make range guns out of them. I certainly doubt I will ever shoot over 2,000 rounds from my Keltec. After the initial 400 rounds I fired through it on break-in, over quite a few shooting outings, I probably only shoot it twice a year running a couple of magazines through it each time.

You can extend the useful life of most compact, medium and large frame guns nearly indefinitely with parts replacement as needed.

Common parts usually needed to extend the life of a pocket gun will be recoil springs, firing pins and extractors. For my plinking and range guns as well as my carry guns, I usually keep a spare recoil spring and firing pin.

If you own any vintage guns that may be hard to find parts for, it is best to get some spares when you can, so you don't have to be concerned regarding wearing out an heirloom and having it in a non-shooting condition.
 
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