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I use the method of measuring my COL(case overall length) per reloading handbook.Or, crimp on the cannelure if so equipped.Then push the bullet end of the round against the edge of my bench.Trying to push the bullet in farther.Then re-measure the COL. If it stays the same. That's it. If not, then screw the crimp die in a little farther for more crimp.
 

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Yup, that's what I've always done.
 

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i've always just crimped in the cannelure. i guess i've never really checked for a "proper crimp". now you have me thinking i ought to do it, at least try to do. i have checked the overall length since the majority of my handgun loads are for semi autos. i shall be curious to follow this thread. thanx.
 

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It seems to me that if you are loading for an auto-loader and the bullets are not pulling from the case and jamming up the gun, your crimp is good. I use the Lee factory crimp die in my last station and also crimp to the cannulure. I don't trim my 357 mag cases, just shoot em till the neck cracks. IRISH
 

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I only recload .45acp right now and am now using any crimping on them.

I figure out the bet balance which seats the bullet without problems and yet retins the bullet strongly.

I test them by putting a few in a mag and letting the slide fall on every one hard two times.

The worst they receded was .002, which is nothing.
With the FMJ's I go for an OAL of 1.260, right between 1.256-1.266 as recommended.

I've shot 250 reloads I've made now in my Charles Daly 1911 and my PT145 without one hickup.
 

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For the revolver, I roll crimp into the bullet cannelure, then check the OAL with dial calipers so the maximum cartridge length is not exceeded. Then a final check in a Midway cartridge gauge for overall dimensions. For semi-auto, I taper crimp just enough to flatten the flare made on the case mouth to start bullet seating. This is adequate because proper tension on the bullet is a factor of bullet diameter and case sizing, not degree of crimp. Then I push the loaded round against my bench to make sure the bullet won't move in the case. Check OAL with dial calipers and a final check in a cartridge gauge to make sure the loaded case mouth will provide a sufficient ledge to headspace the cartridge in a firearm chamber.
 

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You can use a bathroom scale if you want,push the finished bullet down to get 10lbs on the scale and recheck the round for OAL. If it stays the same your good to go,if not then screw in some crimp.
 
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