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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I grew up with a father that was always in law enforcement, or worked as a Private Detective as a Executive protection officer.

My brother and I were always taught not to touch. We also shot at a young age.

But this was a time when most households had the wood glass gun cabinets.

We were always expected to report anyone that was playing with guns or to immediately leave and talk to any of the fathers in the neighborhood.

We grew up in different times. Today I have two of my grandchildren living with me. I normally carry all day. And any of my other guns are locked up. I have several safes from a large one to several single gun safes for different house guns.

They know the rules but have not grown up the same as we were.
I will not risk an accident with any neighborhood kids. And I never talk about guns when kids are around. They may see me carrying but have never said anything.

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You are right about that, different times for sure.
 

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Holy carp Tuco are you my brother from another mother? For the record, I did the exact same stuff.
We're all brothers and sisters from other mothers. Perhaps "kindred spirits" would be a more accurate description.

Yup, I was thinking the same thing!! I actually am surprised I made it to my current age, 56, as someone the stuff I did was downright crazy!
Glad I'm not the only one. I'm lucky to still have all my fingers and toes intact. I'm covered in scars from my reckless youth.
I can only imagine what folks think of me given my appearance, but the truth was that I didn't earn a single scar in a fight, (my crooked teeth are another story) just from being a wild child with too little sense for his own good. That's why I refuse to accept the notion that I am a genius, regardless of who says it or how qualified they may be to make such as assessment, no genius has this many scars from the sheer amount of dumb, reckless things that I did.
 

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Gun safety comes in different flavors... today, people seem to rely on instilling fear. When I was a lad I got my first gun at a very young age (6?), a Remington 513 single-shot. My dad took me to the range on weekends and I learned both to shoot and to treat guns with respect. I was responsible for cleaning my gun and it was kept in my closet. To this day I could not use a firearm improperly. Was I unsafe because I was not taught to not touch guns. No I was safe because I was taught gun safety, respect for the gun, and respect for other people.
That said, as adults it is up to you to evaluate your situation, your family, and the social construct in which you live and behave accordingly.
(Take a look at the Eddie Eagle program, which was designed to teach gun safety to the younguns. It might help you decide how you want to approach the subject.
 

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There were no guns in my house growing up. My dad sold them, but didn't own one. I had friends whose parents had .22's, both revolvers and rifles, and one had a .38 Spl S&W of some model with a 4" barrel. My dad did come home with a 12 guage shotgun when the '68 riots approached our neighborhood before fizzling out. Back to the store it went after it was all over with. My first time shooting was my mom's cousin's 1911 when I was about 9 years old. It was fun, and did a lot to end the "mystery" of guns for me. When I was about 13, a friend found his late grandfather's old gun in a trunk, along with a lot of ammo. Of course, we took it and shot it at what was actually a pretty safe place to shoot. We then put it back where we found it, and then a few weeks later, his little brother, who turned out to have a genius IQ, took it out, loaded it up and cranked off a round, punching a hole in their basement wall. I have a few friends who had kids and guns in the same house later on, and IMHO, having them look at, handle, and shoot, is the key to keeping them from doing something stupid like my friend's little brother did. My one friend's grandson had shot everything from a BB gun to a 1911 by the time he was 10 or so, starting with the BB gun at age 5. He's like 25 now, and has only one gun, an S&W 28-2, which is locked up well, partly because, as he says, "My kid doesn't seem to have the sense I did back at their age!".
In regards to his son, I would agree, totally. He does some very foolish things, as the scar on his face from the neighbor's very nice dog that he harassed to the point he finally had enough, and nipped him under his left eye. His sister I would trust handling a gun, even at age 7. Not a big gun like a 28-2, but a .22 like grandpa has would be ok, she seems to be older than her years, kind of like my sister was.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
We're all brothers and sisters from other mothers. Perhaps "kindred spirits" would be a more accurate description.



Glad I'm not the only one. I'm lucky to still have all my fingers and toes intact. I'm covered in scars from my reckless youth.
I can only imagine what folks think of me given my appearance, but the truth was that I didn't earn a single scar in a fight, (my crooked teeth are another story) just from being a wild child with too little sense for his own good. That's why I refuse to accept the notion that I am a genius, regardless of who says it or how qualified they may be to make such as assessment, no genius has this many scars from the sheer amount of dumb, reckless things that I did.
If you look up DUMB on the dictionary you will see my my picture there so...LOL!. One of my dumbest; 120 MPH on a Triumph TT 550 on a freezing cold Nebraska night while carrying and half drunk! THATS DUMB! I was only 17 so……Never again!
 

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I think that a degree of fear is a healthy thing when it comes to firearms, considering that they are deadly weapons, so in order to respect them as such, their potential for harm must be acknowledged.

Besides, young children lack the emotional depth and capacity for reasoning to assume personal responsibility (heck, many adults do as well, but I digress) and be trusted with the safe handling of firearms, so to me it makes the most sense for a child's introduction to firearms be to inform them of the danger they pose so that they won't go playing with them in the event in which they get their hands on one, in spite of all efforts to safeguard the children by keeping firearms out of their reach.
Lesson number two would be to teach them about safe handling of firearms once they've reached an appropriate age/level of maturity.

Granted, I am no parent, nor do I believe myself qualified to raise a child, but I do believe that privileges ought to be introduced gradually as a child ages for the sake of providing them with a healthy concept of progression, that most things in life are earned, not given.
And please don't get hung up on me referring to firearms ownership as a "privilege" because obviously I am referring to it as such in context because obviously children aren't yet adults and therefore while it is a constitutionally protected right of all citizens, a child isn't of legal age to own a firearm, and therefore their access to firearms is purely left up to parental discretion, thus contextually rendering it a privilege rather than a right. Comprende?

If you look up DUMB on the dictionary you will see my my picture there so...LOL!. One of my dumbest; 120 MPH on a Triumph TT 550 on a freezing cold Nebraska night while carrying and half drunk! THATS DUMB! I was only 17 so……Never again!
I suppose that I somewhat fortunate to have never really gotten into alcohol. My aforementioned childhood foolishness brought me into contact with all sorts of toxins and bacteria as a young boy, so my body mutated and developed an overactive immune system, ergo I suffer from terrible allergies and my body reacts quite violently and somewhat unpredictably when introduced to any microbial cultures, alcohol included, so drinking it makes me nauseous. I couldn't keep enough alcohol down to get me drunk if I tried.

Also, poor eyesight kept me from operating any motorized vehicles, save for things like tractor mowers which are virtually impossible to crash, much less cause much damage if you do.
 
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
There were no guns in my house growing up. My dad sold them, but didn't own one. I had friends whose parents had .22's, both revolvers and rifles, and one had a .38 Spl S&W of some model with a 4" barrel. My dad did come home with a 12 guage shotgun when the '68 riots approached our neighborhood before fizzling out. Back to the store it went after it was all over with. My first time shooting was my mom's cousin's 1911 when I was about 9 years old. It was fun, and did a lot to end the "mystery" of guns for me. When I was about 13, a friend found his late grandfather's old gun in a trunk, along with a lot of ammo. Of course, we took it and shot it at what was actually a pretty safe place to shoot. We then put it back where we found it, and then a few weeks later, his little brother, who turned out to have a genius IQ, took it out, loaded it up and cranked off a round, punching a hole in their basement wall. I have a few friends who had kids and guns in the same house later on, and IMHO, having them look at, handle, and shoot, is the key to keeping them from doing something stupid like my friend's little brother did. My one friend's grandson had shot everything from a BB gun to a 1911 by the time he was 10 or so, starting with the BB gun at age 5. He's like 25 now, and has only one gun, an S&W 28-2, which is locked up well, partly because, as he says, "My kid doesn't seem to have the sense I did back at their age!".
In regards to his son, I would agree, totally. He does some very foolish things, as the scar on his face from the neighbor's very nice dog that he harassed to the point he finally had enough, and nipped him under his left eye. His sister I would trust handling a gun, even at age 7. Not a big gun like a 28-2, but a .22 like grandpa has would be ok, she seems to be older than her years, kind of like my sister was.
Good report! I was one of those who you would NOT want with a gun till much older. I had ADHD before anyone knew what to was so….thank God I have grown out of it; mostly, LOL!
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Gun safety comes in different flavors... today, people seem to rely on instilling fear. When I was a lad I got my first gun at a very young age (6?), a Remington 513 single-shot. My dad took me to the range on weekends and I learned both to shoot and to treat guns with respect. I was responsible for cleaning my gun and it was kept in my closet. To this day I could not use a firearm improperly. Was I unsafe because I was not taught to not touch guns. No I was safe because I was taught gun safety, respect for the gun, and respect for other people.
That said, as adults it is up to you to evaluate your situation, your family, and the social construct in which you live and behave accordingly.
(Take a look at the Eddie Eagle program, which was designed to teach gun safety to the younguns. It might help you decide how you want to approach the subject.
As a middle schooler in Nebraska all the older kids had shotguns on racks in their pickup trucks. They hunted before and after school. fast forward to today..what’s the difference? RESPECT!
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I think that a degree of fear is a healthy thing when it comes to firearms, considering that they are deadly weapons, so in order to respect them as such, their potential for harm must be acknowledged.

Besides, young children lack the emotional depth and capacity for reasoning to assume personal responsibility (heck, many adults do as well, but I digress) and be trusted with the safe handling of firearms, so to me it makes the most sense for a child's introduction to firearms be to inform them of the danger they pose so that they won't go playing with them in the event in which they get their hands on one, in spite of all efforts to safeguard the children by keeping firearms out of their reach.
Lesson number two would be to teach them about safe handling of firearms once they've reached an appropriate age/level of maturity.

Granted, I am no parent, nor do I believe myself qualified to raise a child, but I do believe that privileges ought to be introduced gradually as a child ages for the sake of providing them with a healthy concept of progression, that most things in life are earned, not given.
And please don't get hung up on me referring to firearms ownership as a "privilege" because obviously I am referring to it as such in context because obviously children aren't yet adults and therefore while it is a constitutionally protected right of all citizens, a child isn't of legal age to own a firearm, and therefore their access to firearms is purely left up to parental discretion, thus contextually rendering it a privilege rather than a right. Comprende?
Got it and totally agree.
 

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We kept them out of reach and out of sight with the kids. They knew what they were- and probably had a good idea of where they generally were- but they also knew what the results would be if they ever acted on that knowledge.

I've got a great nephew that's 3. Right now, it's still the ultimatum phase- NO TOUCHING- for the most part and teaching him the difference between toys and real guns. To help accomplish this, there's a Daisy Red Ryder propped up beside the front door. It's in plain sight of every one in the room and has been there far longer than he's been alive

When he comes over, he can't touch it. Period.

He decided that one of his toy rifles needs to be sat beside the Red Ryder. That's fine, and he goes and gets his toy rifle to play with and puts it up when he's done with it- but he still can't even touch the BB gun because it's not a toy.

His Dad as already carried him to the range and started teaching range discipline to him as well. When their family and hunting buddies went to check zero on their hunting rifles this year, he carried the little one with them. (Yes, he had eyes and ears protection- before somebody starts throwing around accusations of carelessness without really knowing anything about the situation.) When he came home, my niece said that he was now using range commands before he shot his toy rifles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
We kept them out of reach and out of sight with the kids. They knew what they were- and probably had a good idea of where they generally were- but they also knew what the results would be if they ever acted on that knowledge.

I've got a great nephew that's 3. Right now, it's still the ultimatum phase- NO TOUCHING- for the most part and teaching him the difference between toys and real guns. To help accomplish this, there's a Daisy Red Ryder propped up beside the front door. It's in plain sight of every one in the room and has been there far longer than he's been alive

When he comes over, he can't touch it. Period.

He decided that one of his toy rifles needs to be sat beside the Red Ryder. That's fine, and he goes and gets his toy rifle to play with and puts it up when he's done with it- but he still can't even touch the BB gun because it's not a toy.

His Dad as already carried him to the range and started teaching range discipline to him as well. When their family and hunting buddies went to check zero on their hunting rifles this year, he carried the little one with them. (Yes, he had eyes and ears protection- before somebody starts throwing around accusations of carelessness without really knowing anything about the situation.) When he came home, my niece said that he was now using range commands before he shot his toy rifles.
Excellent pattern good report.
 

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All of my children are grown and there are young ones that visit my home these days. When my children were about 6 or 7 we took them on their first trip to the range. I outfitted each with glasses and ear protection. The each child got to shoot one of my .22 revolvers. Curiosity satisfied. Firearm safety was discussed regularly at home. From time to time, I would place an unloaded and safety checked handgun on my bed and ask one of my children to hand it to me, paying careful attention to where they placed their fingers. From that, they learned safe handling of a firearm and each was instructed that if they were ever at someone's home and saw someone handling a gun in any other way, get to a safe place and call me and I would come pick them up. All firearms in my home, if not under my direct control, are secured. If you think a child can't get to it, they will and we'll read about it in the news. If you think a child can't find it, they will and we'll read about it in the news.
 

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You're welcome....
I'm not sure I'd go so far as to say it's the "best" - from what I remember of it, a lot of common sense things (which is lacking in some people these days) and information you can/will find elsewhere, but this does indeed put (a lot of) it in one easy (and quick) to read place, which makes it a good resource.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
The NRA has the Eddie Eagle Program for young kids. They have a video for kids. Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program

It's kind of corny, but, depending on the age of the kids, it's good. They also have parent resources, etc. in the links under the video.
Thanks I forgot about Eddie Eagle, great reminder. Blessings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
A little dated and there are a couple of updates but this really sticks with younger kids.
My wife and I just watched the Eddie Eagle film. we both thought it was cute as heck and good easy to remember the mantra. It is something younger kids could get into and remember, loved it.
 
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