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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Like so many I have younger kids and teens that come visit. I tell them all. “IF they see any of my weapons DO NOT TOUCH them as they are to consider them all loaded and can hurt or kill a person.“ That said I do keep my weapons safely stored and unloaded with the exception of my home defense pistol, that one is always in my filed of vision or on my person. WE all know kids can be curious, get into things quickly and you can’t watch em all the time. What’s your mantra?
 

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I was in law enforcement for 30 years and told my kids to leave them alone if they saw one. In all those years after they were old enough to move about, one of them came to me as I left a backup revolver out.

However, to be blunt, the onus is on the owner to think forward. I worked in the Homicide Division for many years, and I remember one scene in which a 17 year old young man removed his police officer stepfather's revolver from it's holster, which had been on a shelf in the closet. The young man emptied the cylinder, closed it, and played Russian roulette in front of his girlfriend. On the second or third pull of the trigger of the .357, he shot himself. This after the girlfriend told him repeatedly to put the gun back. Sad day...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was in law enforcement for 30 years and told me kids to leave them alone if why saw one. In all those years after they were old enough to move about, one of them came to me as I left a backup revolver out.

However, to be blunt, the onus is on the owner to think forward. I worked in the Homicide Division for many years, and I remember one scene in which a 17 year old young man removed his police officer stepfather's revolver from it's holster, which had been on a shelf in the closet. The young man emptied the cylinder, closed it, and played Russian roulette in front of his girlfriend. On the second or third pull of the trigger of the .357, he shot himself. This after the girlfriend told him repeatedly to put the gun back. Sad day...
Sad indeed! Appreciate your service!
 

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I don't have any children in my household, but if I did, then I'd teach them the way my parents taught me and my siblings; by not treating them like total idiots who cannot comprehend the simple concept that is threat of personal injury.

Children know pain, they have very low tolerance for pain, and generally cannot stand so much as a splinter of wood in their hands/feet, ergo by simply explaining to them that getting shot is like a much larger splinter that would easily penetrate straight through their hand or foot and result in far greater pain than a splinter, resulting in hospitalization or eternal slumber, most children will recognize guns as a hazard and thusly shy away from them.

My parents kept a loaded .32 Revolver above the fireplace, where me or any of my siblings could have dragged up a chair and taken it down if left unsupervised, but my parents taught us all that guns were dangerous and that we would get badly hurt if we played with them, plus they kept us well supervised, so like heck would we ever have been able to get that revolver down even if we wanted to.

So there you go, simple as that, I would bluntly explain to children in simplistic terms that they could easily understand that just are hazardous objects which would result in serious injury if played with, and keep them out of reach so that the children couldn't freely/easily access them.

I honestly believe that what causes children to play with guns is by failure of the parent to adequately express that firearms are very dangerous and that playing with them will certainly result in injury. Kids don't want to get hurt, they want to play and have fun, getting hurt isn't fun, so by simply explaining that they will get hurt like never before if they play with a gun, (especially if punctuated by direct comparison to something painful they can understand like a Bee/Wasp Sting, for example) they'll immediately lose interest in favor of parentally approved activities which hold minimum risk of injury.
 

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For me it is a combo of hands on training and securing firearms. 99.9% of the time its just me and ginger. But when kids come over, all rifles on racks are unloaded and ammo secured, all handguns are locked up except my carry piece which is on me.
 
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Just as i was taught about firearms, i showed my kids what they can do. Took them target shooting and blew stuff up. Let them/made them shoot it to feel the power. Took them hunting. The first bird or squirrel got wacked dead. You see, it can kill you just as well as destroy anything you point at. ITs not a toy. It will KILL. Respect and care must be given or something DIES and its your fault. I worked on me. It worked on my kids. I suspect it has worked as long as there has been powder and ball.

securing a firearm? around little kids but from the time i was ten, i was shown where the guns were and told to use them for anything if i needed. But i would be responsible for any use to was not what they were for. I was well train by my eagle scout/Army father of what the use of a firearm if for, Killing. If i wanted to play i had my BB/pellet guns.
 

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I grew up with a father that was always in law enforcement, or worked as a Private Detective as a Executive protection officer.

My brother and I were always taught not to touch. We also shot at a young age.

But this was a time when most households had the wood glass gun cabinets.

We were always expected to report anyone that was playing with guns or to immediately leave and talk to any of the fathers in the neighborhood.

We grew up in different times. Today I have two of my grandchildren living with me. I normally carry all day. And any of my other guns are locked up. I have several safes from a large one to several single gun safes for different house guns.

They know the rules but have not grown up the same as we were.
I will not risk an accident with any neighborhood kids. And I never talk about guns when kids are around. They may see me carrying but have never said anything.

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I have two kids. A 2 year old and a 3 year old. They have both been shown my guns. Kids understand more than most people give them credit for. They can't define the difference between a pistol and a revolver, but if asked "What's that?" they know, and will reply, "Gun!".
Thanks to a silly cartoon dvd I bought at a local gun show called "Eddy Eagle", if I also ask them "What do you do?" they'll both look at the gun and say "Stop! Don't touch!".

They've been to the range and pretty much know that they don't like guns, yet, and if they touch daddy's guns the best outcome they're gonna get is a severe spanking.

Aside from teaching, I also support keeping any gun that's not being used, carried or placed for a specific purpose, put up, unloaded.

Sometimes a gun is out for a purpose, in which case just teaching the kids is the most important thing.
I keep a tactical 12 gauge pump next to my head leaning against the bed. I don't suggest unwelcome guests. It is loaded, but not chambered, and behind the bedside table, and I have confirmed a few times that the babies know it's a gun and not to touch it.

In short, love them enough to take a minute and teach them. Locked boxes and safes as a back up plan aren't a bad idea either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
For me it is a combo of hands on training and securing firearms. 99.9% of the time its just me and ginger. But when kids come over, all rifles on racks are unloaded and ammo secured, all handguns are locked up except my carry piece which is on me.
Yes
 

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I was handed an 870 with hot turkey loads at 6-7 years old. That got the message across that guns hurt and are not toys. Always had loaded guns around growing up and never had an issue. If I showed interest in a gun I was taught to shoot, clean, and disassemble it. Always had airsoft guns I could shoot all day. If there was any poor gun handling it would have been spotted long before I got to the real guns. Their eyes won't stay good forever. Gotta get them shooting while the shooting is good.
 

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Just as i was taught about firearms, i showed my kids what they can do. Took them target shooting and blew stuff up. Let them/made them shoot it to feel the power. Took them hunting. The first bird or squirrel got wacked dead. You see, it can kill you just as well as destroy anything you point at. ITs not a toy. It will KILL. Respect and care must be given or something DIES and its your fault. I worked on me. It worked on my kids. I suspect it has worked as long as there has been powder and ball.

securing a firearm? around little kids but from the time i was ten, i was shown where the guns were and told to use them for anything if i needed. But i would be responsible for any use to was not what they were for. I was well train by my eagle scout/Army father of what the use of a firearm if for, Killing. If i wanted to play i had my BB/pellet guns.
This is a practical approach. If I recall correctly, the first time I fired a real gun was when I was 7 or 8 years old and my dad let me shoot a round of .22 Short out of his Winchester 62. I had received a Red Ryder BB Gun as a gift from my grandfather on my 6th Birthday, which they taught me to be responsible with, and I was only allowed to shoot it with adult supervision, otherwise it was locked up in my father's gun cabinet. So the .22 Short was the next logical step since I had already proven myself competent/responsible with the .17 BBs.

For the record, I was actually a rather destructive child who derived far too much entertainment from blasting cans with my BB Gun, tossing around Firecrackers, disassembling/dissecting electronic devices, starting fires in my backyard, chopping wood, and busting rocks with hammers. So if I could learn to follow basic firearms safety, then just about any ordinary, more meek, mild mannered child most certainly can too.
 

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For the record, I was actually a rather destructive child who derived far too much entertainment from blasting cans with my BB Gun, tossing around Firecrackers, disassembling/dissecting electronic devices, starting fires in my backyard, chopping wood, and busting rocks with hammers. So if I could learn to follow basic firearms safety, then just about any ordinary, more meek, mild mannered child most certainly can too.
Holy carp Tuco are you my brother from another mother? For the record, I did the exact same stuff.
 

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I started my kids at an early age with firearms training.
I started with discussions and having them learn the rules and learn about the guns I had in a hands on manner.
Next step was shooting airsoft and BB guns in the garage.
Once they were competent with them we went to the range and they started with a 22 bolt action that had come from my father-in-law after he passed.
They have gone numerous times and both enjoy it.
Good luck teaching your children.
 

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Me, I was an absolute angel growing up, so when the letter from Boystown in Omaha showed up I was shocked, shocked I tell ya, absolutely shocked! After my mom pretending to look for the luggage to ship me off and my meltdown, I did straighten up for at least a day or two. It was years later that I found out it was just a fund-raising letter and not an acceptance or application letter. 😂
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I don't have any children in my household, but if I did, then I'd teach them the way my parents taught me and my siblings; by not treating them like total idiots who cannot comprehend the simple concept that is threat of personal injury.

Children know pain, they have very low tolerance for pain, and generally cannot stand so much as a splinter of wood in their hands/feet, ergo by simply explaining to them that getting shot is like a much larger splinter that would easily penetrate straight through their hand or foot and result in far greater pain than a splinter, resulting in hospitalization or eternal slumber, most children will recognize guns as a hazard and thusly shy away from them.

My parents kept a loaded .32 Revolver above the fireplace, where me or any of my siblings could have dragged up a chair and taken it down if left unsupervised, but my parents taught us all that guns were dangerous and that we would get badly hurt if we played with them, plus they kept us well supervised, so like heck would we ever have been able to get that revolver down even if we wanted to.

So there you go, simple as that, I would bluntly explain to children in simplistic terms that they could easily understand that just are hazardous objects which would result in serious injury if played with, and keep them out of reach so that the children couldn't freely/easily access them.

I honestly believe that what causes children to play with guns is by failure of the parent to adequately express that firearms are very dangerous and that playing with them will certainly result in injury. Kids don't want to get hurt, they want to play and have fun, getting hurt isn't fun, so by simply explaining that they will get hurt like never before if they play with a gun, (especially if punctuated by direct comparison to something painful they can understand like a Bee/Wasp Sting, for example) they'll immediately lose interest in favor of parentally approved activities which hold minimum risk of injury.
Well said Tuco and I agree it’s your reasoning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I started my kids at an early age with firearms training.
I started with discussions and having them learn the rules and learn about the guns I had in a hands on manner.
Next step was shooting airsoft and BB guns in the garage.
Once they were competent with them we went to the range and they started with a 22 bolt action that had come from my father-in-law after he passed.
They have gone numerous times and both enjoy it.
Good luck teaching your children.
Teaching is the key, good response!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Me, I was an absolute angel growing up, so when the letter from Boystown in Omaha showed up I was shocked, shocked I tell ya, absolutely shocked! After my mom pretending to look for the luggage to ship me off and my meltdown, I did straighten up for at least a day or two. It was years later that I found out it was just a fund-raising letter and not an acceptance or application letter. 😂
Bwahahahaha good Mama for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
This is a practical approach. If I recall correctly, the first time I fired a real gun was when I was 7 or 8 years old and my dad let me shoot a round of .22 Short out of his Winchester 62. I had received a Red Ryder BB Gun as a gift from my grandfather on my 6th Birthday, which they taught me to be responsible with, and I was only allowed to shoot it with adult supervision, otherwise it was locked up in my father's gun cabinet. So the .22 Short was the next logical step since I had already proven myself competent/responsible with the .17 BBs.

For the record, I was actually a rather destructive child who derived far too much entertainment from blasting cans with my BB Gun, tossing around Firecrackers, disassembling/dissecting electronic devices, starting fires in my backyard, chopping wood, and busting rocks with hammers. So if I could learn to follow basic firearms safety, then just about any ordinary, more meek, mild mannered child most certainly can too.
For sure and good lessons here.
 
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