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Anyone know the history of the PT940? I have one, and like it quite a bit, but it's an odd bird in some ways.

Was it designed for a particular customer (a South American police force, perhaps) or as a non-infringing clone of some other gun?

And, is Taurus still selling them?

Clint
Open Skies - Long Vistas
 

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My 1st Taurus was a PT945ssc (Stainless and compensated). I bought it off an LEO who owned one in blue and purchased this one after being wounded in his left arm (shooting arm). He bought the ported one for ease of shooting with the now weak arm. Once he gained his strength back, he moved on to something else. I have since sold that gun to my co-worker who bought the blue one.

I liked the gun, but was a little bulky for my small sized hands. It is ctually the gun that got me into shooting autos and Taurus. I'm sure that wasn't the history you wanted, but that's the all I got to offer. :)
 

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Hey Kansas_Plainsman:

I cannot tell you anything about the history of the PT940.
But, I have one also. I bought the PT940SSPRL back in
December of 2004. I carry it on a regular basis.
Also, I carry a little Glock27. But mostly, I carry the 940.

The 940 is carried in a black crossdraw holster, made by
Ted Blocker. It's a lefthanded holster. They did a splendid
job on that holster. If you DO run across any more info on
the 940 history, please post it.
 

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Taurus first introduced their "FIRST INDEPENDENT DESIGN" in 1995 with their PT-945 handgun, utilizing a forged aluminum frame the design was intended to be a slim, lightweight handgun for those needing something different in their handgun.

Designed with a 3-way hammer drop safety to allow the user to carry the weapon "cocked and locked" which is a feature some find desirable in their handguns.

The following year the company released a follow up to this design in the PT-940, essentially the same as the model before it this handgun was chambered in 40 Smith & Wesson.

In 1997 spurned on by positive sales the company released the PT-911 chambered in 9mm Parabellum and the PT-938 chambered in 380 ACP, both have proven since to be popular models.

Finally in 1999 the company capitalized on the popularity of the 357 SIG cartridge and
introduced the PT-957 handgun.
 

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Not Exactly, but close.

Actually when Taurus decided to go with the Browning/Sig style locking system, they first brought out the 9mm PT908 and then brought out the .45 PT945 very shortly thereafter. A few years later they decided to cancel the PT908 and bring out the higher capacity PT911, which had basicly the PT908 topend on a frame made for a double column magazine design. Then Taurus mated the PT911 frame to a .40 S&W topend and the PT940 was born.


PT92, PT908, and PT945
 

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I don't want to cause an confusion, but here is the source information I have gathered from the Taurus website and an article from the American Hungunner 2002

What is the history of the 900 series pistol?

Taurus entered the medium-frame pistol field in 1992 with its PT940 pistol with a 4" barrel and 10 round capacity magazine. The firing pin in these pistols is physically blocked unless the trigger is pulled to the rear. As with other Taurus pistols, all 900 series handguns have a hammer forged alloy frame and come equipped with a visible and tactile loaded chamber indicator.
In 1994, Taurus moved into the .45 ACP medium-frame pistol market with its PT945. The Commander-sized PT945 features a loaded chamber indicator in addition to Taurus' proprietary security system, which was the first in the industry to be integrated into the design of the handgun itself.
In 1997 came the introduction of the PT9ll and PT938 in 9x19 and 9xl7mm (.380 ACP), respectively. Both pistols are similar in appearance, but are functionally quite different. The PT911 is a compact locked breech 9mm while the PT938 is blowback operated.
 

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Red Hawkeye & jwc007

Listen, I'm trying to do some documenting for the history of the 900 series. You both seem to be speaking from some sources, and if you can refer me to them, I'd appreciate it... currently the two I'm working with are Taurus USA History & American Handgunner, May, 2002 by Charles Cutshaw
 

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My source is my history as I used to work for a Firearms Distributor who sold them, not to mention my own history with owning them. Also, the American Handgunner Info does not take into account the PT908 history and the fact that the PT945 predates the PT940, at all! The .40 S&W was just a new up and coming cartridge at the time of the PT908 and PT945's market introduction, but one that was catching on fast!
 

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Great Info Guys. I love my PT911 9mm I use for carry when I can wear my jacket, love the looks and function and safety of it.
I was thinking of getting another SS tactical in 45 though. The PT945.. Would be a great little gun in SS with the punch of a 45.
I think they have 10+1 in the 945, right?

I have a bersa thunder 380 also that is a lot smaller and lighter, but I think the intimidation factor, and 15+1 in 9mm of PT911 type
vs the bersa is better. ;D
 

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mrnuke7571 said:
I think they have 10+1 in the 945, right?
Nope! The PT945's original magazine capacity is 8+1. There are aftermarket magazines for it that do bring it up to 10+1, but they stick out the bottom of the grip about 2 inches and can snag on clothing if used for CCW. I have 5 of the aftermarket 10 round magazines and they work well, but I much prefer the original 8 round magazines.
 

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The PT911 is a compact locked breech 9mm while the PT938 is blowback operated.
Cimmaron,

How can you tell the diffference between a locked breech and blowback? Where did you get that info specific to the PT938? Did Taurus confirm or was the blowback operation assumed since most .380's are blowback?

I have a PT938 that I absolutely love. There's not much info on it since it's been discontinued and it's a rare breed anyway with the round it's chambered for. I'm becoming somewhat of a collecter of .380 guns and I crave knowledge ;)

I have a Colt Government .380 that is locked breech and a Bersa .380 that is blowback along with the PT938. To be honest, I can't tell the difference just by shooting. Is there a tell-tale sign to look for when I look under the hood?
 

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How can you tell the diffference between a locked breech and blowback?
A locked breech design will normally have a pivoting barrel which will have to "unlock" before the slide can move to the rear. A blowback design has a fixed barrel and the slide moves with locking into the barrel mechanism. (Exception: The Luger has a fixed barrel but the toggle provides the locking to the breech).
PS: I didn't see any mention of the PT-957 which is identical to the PT-940 except for caliber (.357SIG).
 

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captainbob said:
How can you tell the diffference between a locked breech and blowback?
A locked breech design will normally have a pivoting barrel which will have to "unlock" before the slide can move to the rear.
Actually, in a Browning Style locked breach design, the slide and barrel travel rearward, i.e. Locked together, a short distance, before the unlocking happens in the cycle of firing.

Also, not all locked breach designs have a pivoting barrel design. The Luger, Broomhandle Mauser, Walther P38, Beretta/Taurus 92, CZ52, and Beretta Couger/PX4, all use different mechanisms for achieving the same effect, to name a few.

captainbob said:
A blowback design has a fixed barrel and the slide moves with locking into the barrel mechanism. (Exception: The Luger has a fixed barrel but the toggle provides the locking to the breech).
In the basic Blowback designs there is no mechanical locking, save for the tension of the recoil spring holding the slide in battery.

As for the Luger Pistol (and I own one) it's upper frame and barrel do travel back in the frame a short distance before the toggle unlocks and ejects the spent shell, hence it is a true locked breach design.

As for the PT957, it has not been that popular here, but it certainly deserves a mention. I do know that Taurus added it to it's lineup, the next year after Sig and Winchester/Olin announced it. As to whether it continues on or is replaced by a PT800 model (PT857), will remain to be seen.
 

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Now, does the 24/7 Pro in 9mm have the locked breach design? What about the Taurus Millennium Pro in .380?
My understanding is that the locked breach makes for a softer recoil. Example, a blow back design, like the Bersa .380 would have more felt recoil than a 9mm in a locked breech design, although the 9mm is a bit stouter round than the .380 (9mm short).
Correct?
 

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Darth AkSarBen said:
Now, does the 24/7 Pro in 9mm have the locked breach design? What about the Taurus Millennium Pro in .380?
Yes, the basic 24/7 design is that of a locked breach design, as the slide travels back a bit before unlocking in the same manner as Browning HP's, Glocks, Sigs, and many others using a similar design.

As I have not disassembled or operated a Taurus Millenium Pro in .380, I do not know for sure, but if they follow the same design as the 9mm version, then yes. Some .380's, such as the Beretta 84 and similar Taurus PT58, have what is called a Delayed Blowback. In the Delayed Blowback, under recoil, the slide and barrel travel back a short distance before separating, but are never really mechanicaly locked together. A Delayed Blowback will shoot with less recoil than a regular straight Blowback action.
 
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