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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings everyone!

Ok, bought myself a new revolver from GunBroker. A Taurus 44 tracker, used, and hopefully ready to shoot.

Been wanting to ask Taurus owners about reloading for the 44. I have a Speer #15 manual. I am brand new to reloading. I want to start with a modest load and get to know the gun. I was going to start reloading with Green Dot and my 12 ga. So I have 2 lbs of Green Dot. But I changed my mind. Gonna start with the 44. (also have H110 on the way from Midway.)

The load is for 240 gr LSWC and reads --> CCI 300 - 6.0 up to 7.0 which should get me about 900 fps with maybe 400 ft/lbs. That feels kinda low.

So, opinions please. I just wanna learn reloading and get to know my new gun.

Thanks very much.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I guess I could tell you folks some background. I'm over 50. Been shooting since I was little. Just about anything, bows, bb guns, sling shots, rifles, shotguns, pistols.

A little over two years ago, my wife and I lost our home to a fire. I lost a lot of guns and bows and and and.

One if those guns was a Christmas present from my Dad. First time in my life he gave me a relevant anything. It was a S&W 686+. I absolutely loved it. But the fire turned into a boat anchor.

So I have been replacing things. The replacement for 686 is unreasonablely expensive. I am not willing to pay that much for a gun. Well I might for one of those Ruger no1's. So after shopping for a few months and missing auctions because, well, you know why. I gave up on a Ruger and got the Taurus. I don't mind, it's just that everyone says the Ruger supers are very hard to hurt, so a new would have a little forgiveness built in.

So, here I am. Trying to get started reloading, amid a panic buying phase that has lasted for about 8 years now. But now, no primers no cases, and limited powder choices.

Anyway. Hello everyone.
 

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Welcome to TA from Minnesota. Don't be in a hurry to leave. Some us are older and don't move as fast as others.
 
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While that may seem slow compared to .44 Magnum data, that's right in the neighborhood of .44 Special velocities. Not a bad place to start. It won't beat you up. Driving a LSWC at maximum velocities without a gas check may cause you some leading problems.

I usually leave the maximum loads to jacketed bullets. But lead is great for practice.
 

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The only data I see for using Green Dot powder in a .44 mag. comes directly from Alliant. They say using a 240 LSWC bullet with 7.0 grains of Green Dot powder over a CCI 300 primer will achieve 901 fps out of a 7.5" barreled revolver. It is slow by .44 mag. standards, but like glenwolde said, it won't beat you up. That one load using Green Dot is all they show. Personally, I shoot more .44 Specials out of my .44 mag. revolvers than I do .44 mags.
Alliant Powder - Reloader's Guide
 
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Welcome to the forum from Northern Illinois! Congratulations on the decision to become your own ammo factory. My first 44 Magnum was my Marlin. I had been looking for a good used 357 lever gun and they were scarce new or used at the time so I grabbed the 44 Mag. Took it to the range with factory 240 grain and was extremely disappointed with the amount of recoil. I thought I'd made a huge mistake. I began searching for ways to "download" the cartridge and found some advice to be very cautious in doing do. Case volume, especially with faster powders, can result in flashover. If the powder has a surface area that lies in the case horizontally with air space above it is theorized that the primer spark will ignite the entire charge at once over the top instead of burning in a columnar fashion. Pressure spikes result and could cause unpleasant consequences. HP38 would probably be my last and desperation choice for 44 caliber, but especially magnum rounds. I don't recall if you said you are loading Special or Magnum.

In the Magnum loads I've used H110/W296 but really prefer Universal. Never tried Green Dot. For a fun plinking round find some Trail Boss. My Marlin has a very mild recoil with that powder.

If you shoot indoors, you will probably find as I did that cast bullet lube will produce an inordinate amount of smoke. The larger the caliber, the worse it is. The coated bullets can prevent this, although I've shot some that smell like burning Tupperware.

Gas checked hard cast lead can help you achieve higher velocities with less chance of leading. Best of luck, some load when distracted or tired as it can be a risky business. Only have your powder and primers currently being used out of storage and on your bench and when done, put the powder back in the bottle and back in storage. That way you'll never wonder what went into your cartridge. Let us know more of your adventures!
 

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Welcome to the forum from Northern Illinois! Congratulations on the decision to become your own ammo factory. My first 44 Magnum was my Marlin. I had been looking for a good used 357 lever gun and they were scarce new or used at the time so I grabbed the 44 Mag. Took it to the range with factory 240 grain and was extremely disappointed with the amount of recoil. I thought I'd made a huge mistake. I began searching for ways to "download" the cartridge and found some advice to be very cautious in doing do. Case volume, especially with faster powders, can result in flashover. If the powder has a surface area that lies in the case horizontally with air space above it is theorized that the primer spark will ignite the entire charge at once over the top instead of burning in a columnar fashion. Pressure spikes result and could cause unpleasant consequences. HP38 would probably be my last and desperation choice for 44 caliber, but especially magnum rounds. I don't recall if you said you are loading Special or Magnum.

In the Magnum loads I've used H110/W296 but really prefer Universal. Never tried Green Dot. For a fun plinking round find some Trail Boss. My Marlin has a very mild recoil with that powder.

If you shoot indoors, you will probably find as I did that cast bullet lube will produce an inordinate amount of smoke. The larger the caliber, the worse it is. The coated bullets can prevent this, although I've shot some that smell like burning Tupperware.

Gas checked hard cast lead can help you achieve higher velocities with less chance of leading. Best of luck, some load when distracted or tired as it can be a risky business. Only have your powder and primers currently being used out of storage and on your bench and when done, put the powder back in the bottle and back in storage. That way you'll never wonder what went into your cartridge. Let us know more of your adventures!
Thanks very much. I tend to be meticulous though.
 

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Sometimes they don't list load data for certain powder/cartridge combinations for no more of a reason than they never got around to it. Or they tried it and the initial results were erratic so they decided not to expend the effort and funds to develop load data that didn't show promise.

Of course they also might have found that the pressure curve was unstable and the load was dangerous. Load data from internet forums is always suspect and needs to be confirmed. There's forums I trust more than others.
 

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Sometimes they don't list load data for certain powder/cartridge combinations for no more of a reason than they never got around to it. Or they tried it and the initial results were erratic so they decided not to expend the effort and funds to develop load data that didn't show promise.

Of course they also might have found that the pressure curve was unstable and the load was dangerous. Load data from internet forums is always suspect and needs to be confirmed. There's forums I trust more than others.
Nobody mentioned a lack of load data. The question remains. Is 400 ft/lbs a reasonable beginning point for a new reloader in 44 mag. I get your point though.

Personally I feel like 600 ft/lbs is a better starting place. I say this because my new baby is a "4" inch, but it has a ported barrel. Which I understand limits my max power to about 800 ft/lbs. Or so the charts at Ballistics by the inch indicate. BBTI - Ballistics by the Inch :: Calibers/Cartridges
 

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Welcome aboard. I use my 4" tracker for 44 special. But I also have run magnum reloads using 240 grn pills and 2400 powder running at 1250fps, also a few 300 grn XTP pills running at 1150 FPS. I will look up my recipe's later and post that up. My tracker is very accurate.
 

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Welcome aboard. I use my 4" tracker for 44 special. But I also have run magnum reloads using 240 grn pills and 2400 powder running at 1250fps, also a few 300 grn XTP pills running at 1150 FPS. I will look up my recipe's later and post that up. My tracker is very accurate.
I hope mine is at least a little accurate. I know I am willing to tinker with it to get it there. I know I am capable of 1 inch at 50 feet, I do that regularly with my Crosman single shot. (1337?) So I plan on working with it at the range.
 

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Nobody mentioned a lack of load data. The question remains. Is 400 ft/lbs a reasonable beginning point for a new reloader in 44 mag. I get your point though.

Personally I feel like 600 ft/lbs is a better starting place. I say this because my new baby is a "4" inch, but it has a ported barrel. Which I understand limits my max power to about 800 ft/lbs. Or so the charts at Ballistics by the inch indicate. BBTI - Ballistics by the Inch :: Calibers/Cartridges
To the point then, yes, 400 ft/lbs is a reasonable starting point for a new reloader with a .44 Magnum. I'd venture a guess that 90% of .44 magnum shooters shoot a load close to that 90% of the time. For that matter I'd speculate the same is true for the .357 magnum.

Depends on your goal. If you're a recoil junky or hunter then go full power. Given the 4" barrel I assume the later is not the case.

Left out of this question is your handgun shooting experience. You just don't need a lot of power to punch holes in paper and full power loads can actually be detrimental to skill development in some cases.
 

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To the point then, yes, 400 ft/lbs is a reasonable starting point for a new reloader with a .44 Magnum. I'd venture a guess that 90% of .44 magnum shooters shoot a load close to that 90% of the time. For that matter I'd speculate the same is true for the .357 magnum.

Depends on your goal. If you're a recoil junky or hunter then go full power. Given the 4" barrel I assume the later is not the case.

Left out of this question is your handgun shooting experience. You just don't need a lot of power to punch holes in paper and full power loads can actually be detrimental to skill development in some cases.
Experience level? More than moderate, less than pro. I have shot 44 mag before, Ruger Blackhawk. More than 20 years ago. I remember that it was quite fun to shoot cans with. Especially since that gun was accurate enough to let me pop the can into the air. Loved it. Semi autos are a different story for me though. 8 to 12 inch circle at 100 yds with my now burned up Beretta 96. Never did get used to that trigger.
 

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well welcome to the forum and the hobby of reloading--unfortunately you picked likely the worst time in the last 50 years to start into the hobby.
components are very difficult to locate, and as you picked the 44 magnum you likely aren't going to find lot of free cases laying around on the ground either, primers are especially hard to find, powder is difficult as well and even projectiles are often not available, again in the 44 caliber more so than 355--400--451 as there are not as many floating about.
anyway best suggestion is to try to find a friend that can teach you the ropes, and I suggest that you either use a modern reloading manual or even better go to the powder companies website of the powder that you are using and they have free reloading data that Is done by them for use in their manuals and it is the latest loading data for that powder and that projectile.
enjoy and be safe.
 

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well welcome to the forum and the hobby of reloading--unfortunately you picked likely the worst time in the last 50 years to start into the hobby.
components are very difficult to locate, and as you picked the 44 magnum you likely aren't going to find lot of free cases laying around on the ground either, primers are especially hard to find, powder is difficult as well and even projectiles are often not available, again in the 44 caliber more so than 355--400--451 as there are not as many floating about.
anyway best suggestion is to try to find a friend that can teach you the ropes, and I suggest that you either use a modern reloading manual or even better go to the powder companies website of the powder that you are using and they have free reloading data that Is done by them for use in their manuals and it is the latest loading data for that powder and that projectile.
enjoy and be safe.
Thanks for the welcoming message!

I have found brass. cost $75 for 200 pcs
Primers 1000 large pistol magnum $105 (ouch)
Lee 240 grain mold SWC ? #90029 (already casting some 12 ga slugs) $25
Lee dies 90512 $39
1lb of Hodgdon H110 from Midway (for magnum loads when I am ready)

Nice thought of having a friend. I let you know when I find one. I wonder what it's like.

Already the Speer #15 manual, hope it helps. Like I've been saying, I have wanted to reload for many years.

Thanks again.
 
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