Taurus Firearm Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,749 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Was presented with some really great casting alloy. From an old printing plant for a regional newspaper that dates it's founding to the 1880's here in North Central Montana. When they built a new building and moved and went to new printing machinery and techniques the just threw all the old type, lino or whatever, in the old coal fired furnace in the basement. The building was used off and on for 40 plus years after sitting vacant for some years. The people that now own it are refurbishing it into a museum/antique shop with living quarters included. They cleaned out the furnace and got 8 five gallon buckets of furnace cleanings that weigh every bit of 100 pounds each. I took a sample clinker and smelted it, beautiful high grade bullet alloy. I got some of the buckets home, but some were filled with warm cleanings and are soldered to the steel bucket. Lifting gear, fork lift, skid steer, or something is going to be required. I think i've got my summer work cut out for me, never liked yard work anyway, good thing I'm retired, I'd have to quit my job otherwise, priorities, you know. Conservatively I estimate 550-600 pounds of alloy can be salvaged from this mess. Wish me "fun and good times".
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wolf1477

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,379 Posts
Years ago we used a water heater burner to make a heater to melt lead alloy. Hole in bottom of bucket with angle iron under it to take melted lead to ingot molds saves picking up to move till empty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,749 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I'm using a propane turkey fryer and a 4 quart cast iron sauce pan. Lot of wood ashes, a little coke from coal, some pieces of wire, lots of stuff that has to be cleaned out, but it sure does make some beautiful alloy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,379 Posts
In the south there was a lot of different cast iron cook ware years back. I laughed the first time I saw an old friends lead ingots. He used pans that made muffins, corn bread sticks, and anything that would cast small ingots. He had a small forge with hand turned blower and used stoker coal for fuel. He could heat and work steel or melt lead for bullets over the same forge. Makes plugging up a new bottom pour furnace seem like cheating. We take for granted how much easier we have it than people did in years past. I thank God often for being born when I was and being able to enjoy life as much as I have. To me the work put into things like your bullet metal blessing just makes it that much better. When you are shooting the bullets all the work was worth it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,618 Posts
There's a great variety of alloys used in metal type. Generally, the larger type is monotype, which is even harder than linotype that was used in the smaller type. It may very well be too hard for bullets. Not that they won't work, but even pure linotype is a bit of a waste for bullets. You might want to cut it with lead or wheelweights.

Excellent find. I'd get a propane burner (think crawfish boil) and a big cast iron Lodge dutch oven.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,166 Posts
Linotype alloy is not the best alloy for bullets. Invest in a bullet hardness tester - the Lee is ~ $50, the Saeco ~$130 - and add lead, tin, or antimony til it's right.
(probably lead).
It will be well worth the investment.
Scrap price for linotype metal is 0.30/lb., lead is 0.43
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,749 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I've used linotype for over 30 years. For hard bullets I mix it 50/50 with wheel weights, for my soft alloys I dilute the lino with lead down to about 10 BHN.. I have several hundred pewter ingots cast from a modern pewter, 92.5% tin, 6% antimony and 1.5% copper. I'm getting to the point that I'm going to have to hunt up some lead, I've only got about 300 pounds of soft lead.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TheOldRedneck
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top